Attention to Detail

 

Reader

Reader

Lynn Wartski

It has been interesting letting my work lead me in a direction I had not really considered.  A single mixed media figure sculpture for a group show has led to the creation of several dozen “art dolls”, and introduction of my work to a whole new audience. The intimate scale of these pieces invites the viewer in to take a closer look.  By their very nature these sculptures require that viewer and artist both pay “Attention to Detail”, the title of our newest feature show.

Ever present in all of my sculpture has been hand forged copper raised from flat stock. My art dolls pay homage to this with the face I create for each. Each doll’s face begins as a flat disk that I cut, anneal, hammer, shape and polish. The hands for each art doll are also formed in my metal studio, as are glass eyes created by torch firing enamels on to copper or brass tacks and nail heads. The addition of a wooden head and wire skeleton round out the basic form of these small figure sculptures and adds to the mixed media slightly steampunk flavor of my work.

doll with stick
The sources of inspiration for “who each doll will be”, are endless.  They have come into being both fully formed as a concept and design in my sketchbook, and formed wholly on the work table.

I enjoy the reactions they and their details draw from viewers.  These art dolls bring together so much that I have developed in my work over the years, and I look forward to where they lead me next.

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

Attention to Detail

july postcard
There is a saying that artists know only too well, “the devil is in the details.” The smallest detail can sometimes totally transform a work of art. Although the approaches of artists Linda Carmel, Marcy Lansman and Lynn Wartski are very different, for each of them details are crucial.

Marcy Lansman, whose previous work included very detailed representational paintings, decided to go in a different direction. “Most of the pieces in this show are non-representational. The unifying element is their color palette, which ranges from orange/rust/brown on the one hand through neutral warm gray to blue/blue-green/green on the other. My process has been to lay down a “first draft” quickly in one sitting, restraining myself from any fussing or revising. Inevitably, at the end of this session I feel that I have created a masterpiece! I let this draft sit for a day or so. When I go back, I discover that my masterpiece is not as flawlessly marvelous as it first seemed. Then I begin the process of revising. The challenge then is to clean up the problems without sacrificing the freshness of the original. This is where ‘attention to detail’ comes in.”

Says Lansman, “I have been surprised to discover that I spend just as much time adjusting the details of non-representational as representational work. What is different is the timing and the goal. When I create a drawing, whether it is a flower or a face, I concern myself with details right from the start. In my more abstract work, I focus on major compositional issues at the beginning and deal with the details later. In the representational work, the goal of the details is to capture the appearance and the spirit of the thing I’m painting. In the non–representational work the goal is to create a piece that will be satisfying both to me and to the viewer, something that will please or stimulate or in some way enlighten.”

Lynn Wartski describes the use of detail in her figure sculptures: “For the past couple of years I have concentrated my efforts on small, mixed media figure sculptures that are referred to as ‘sculptural art dolls.’ The intimate scale of these pieces invites the viewer to take a closer look. By their very nature these sculptures require that I pay “attention to detail.”

“Some dolls start as sketches in a book and others are conceived entirely in the studio, but all begin construction with a bit of metalsmithing. Each doll’s face begins as a flat disk cut from copper stock that I anneal, hammer, cut and shape into a face. Eyes are created by torch firing glass enamels on copper or brass nails and tacks. I form the rest of my basic figure from a wooden sphere head atop a twisted wire skeleton. It is at this point that details start to emerge. What will the figure be doing? How will he or she be dressed? Will this be a doll that can live outside? The answers to these and other questions lead to the details that emerge for each figure. One may be simply dressed and seated with a book, another dressed in an ornate costume complete with jewels, and a third riding a bike made just for her.” Wartski enjoys the reactions they and their details draw from viewers. “These figures bring together so much that I have developed in my work over the years.”

Either women or idioms – or sometimes both – are common threads in much of Linda Carmel’s work. However, this year she has brought more global influences into the mix. “I have looked at style and design details from around the world and have used them in each of the paintings in this series,” says Carmel. “Women, cultural designs and idioms are the puzzle pieces I began with in each painting. Even though I started each one with a set of details in mind, it is the “attention to the detail” of the actual painting as it progresses that becomes central. My work is in finding a balance of color and form using those ‘puzzle pieces’ I began with.”

Carmel works with acrylic modeling paste to form three-dimensional paintings on canvas. “I want viewers to become intimate with the painting by feeling the contours of the surface” she says.

Opening Reception

July 25

6-9

Please visit our website

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

INTERSECTIONS – A Potter’s View

Garry'a vase

I am a Potter. A Craftsman. My art comes from a long term relationship between my materials, my tools and my heart.

My primary material is clay, Red Clay in particular. I got serious about red clay while throwing at a Pottery in Vass NC somewhere around 1980. At that time we were making a lot of large unglazed redware jardinieres, strawberry jars and such. Thick pots made fast from soft clay, not much refinement of shape there but I loved the way that clay felt running through my fingers and the earthy, almost swampy smell of it. Taking that most common of muds and learning what I can do with it is a process that began for me then and continues now.

All of my work is formed on a Potter’s Wheel. Potters have all manner of tools. Sticks, wires, cutters of all kinds, almost anything can be used for something in working with clay. The Wheel however, is another matter. It is an instrument. And like a musical one it takes many, many hours of daily practice and repetition to become proficient. I first sat down at a kick wheel in a high school art class in 1972 or maybe ’71, it’s getting hard to recall. I got hooked right away and have been trying to get good at it ever since.Garry at the wheel

It is very important to me that my work be accessible to people. I don’t make pots for art galleries or museums, I make them for people’s homes. My bowls and platters look best on tables with food being shared by families and friends, planters and vases with someones favorite herb or fresh flowers. Some pieces certainly are more decorative in nature. Those are an expression of my joy in the process and hopefully become a part of someones day to day life.

In my thinking “Intersections” is about the intersection of form and surface. Form or shape that grows and expands from within is the essence of all my pieces. Glazes and carving are used to emphasize the shapes and bring color and texture to the surface.

Garry Childs

garry@gcpots.com

919-724-1626

To sign up for the Hillsborough Gallery newsletter, please complete form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

 

LOOK DEEP INTO NATURE AND YOU WILL UNDERSTAND EVERYTHING BETTER

INTERSECTIONS, painting by Jude Lobe

INTERSECTIONS, painting by Jude Lobe

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better”, is a quote by Albert Einstein.

As a child, I loved to put together puzzles. It was fascinating to see how different elements fit together and changed the look of the individual piece that was now part of a whole. Intersections is the coming together of ideas, crossing, and bisecting. Through our lives we all intersect with each other, with nature, and with other cultures. These intersections effect us in multiple ways and help us thrive.  Some of the artworks are expressions of my ‘intersections’, others include different materials intersecting within the same artwork.”

Seeking Serenity, cold wax & oil by Jude Lobe

Seeking Serenity, cold wax & oil by Jude Lobe

My work for this show is predominately cold wax & oil and encaustics. Cold wax is a soft paste formulated to make oil paint colors thicker and more matte. It is made with beeswax, resin and mineral spirits. My technique in painting with cold wax & oil is a process of addition and subtraction.

Nature is my muse and the common thread through my work.  As a part of nature I believe we need to respect the connection we have with the natural environment. In nature things change, evolve. Like a forest goes through an ecological succession, so do we as individuals evolve and are at present a compilation of fragments and parts of the experiences we traveled. Cold wax & oil lends itself perfectly in expressing this idea. It affords the opportunity to show a history of the painting by building up layers, obscuring what’s beneath, and then removing sections of layers to reveal bits of past layers. The paintings represent the history of a life that becomes the compilation of bits and pieces of it’s past experiences.

My hope is that my paintings resonate with the viewer on an emotional level and makes one feel something. I attempt to capture how being out in nature makes me feel free and peaceful.

More of my work can be seen at the Hillsborough Gallery, Oil and Cold Wax  and my Jude Lobe art website. Click on any of the highlighted words to visit those sites.

To sign up for the Hillsborough Gallery newsletter, please complete form below with your name and email address.

Longing for Tranquility,  painting by Jude Lobe

Longing for Tranquility, painting by Jude Lobe

Intersections

CG Wisconsin Summer

Wisconsin Summer

 

Chris Graebner

As a child I moved around a lot – in fact, I attended seven different schools between 1st and 12th grades. But after my husband, Brooks, and I moved to North Carolina in 1973 we put down roots and we have lived here ever since. Other than visiting family we didn’t do much traveling. However, we seem to have entered a new phase in our lives. Our son moved abroad four years ago and so we dusted off our passports and have begun to stir our stumps a bit more.

The longer I paint, the more I look at the world in terms of painting. Painting is my way of sharing what I find most interesting. When I travel I’m constantly considering how I could paint whatever I see – technically. I make paintings in my mind, deciding how to mix certain colors, how to lay down the paint, what surface to use – canvas, linen, wood, clayboard – what to edit out and what to make a focal point.

I take loads of photos when I travel, pictures from cars, from trains, from planes – usually with my phone. They are not great pictures but they return me to the time and place where they were taken and show me see things I might have missed or forgotten. I go through my photos repeatedly and look for interesting angles or bits and pieces that speak to me. However, I’ve noticed that the places I’m painting are generally from trips taken several years earlier – not the most recent one. Somehow, I’m not ready to paint what I’ve just seen. It takes a while to find which images stay with me and come to represent that place.

The paintings in this show are from a number of trips and many different places: Spain in 2011, Hong Kong in 2013, Wisconsin in 2011, Bois Blanc Island in 2012, Louisiana in 2009 and, of course, Hillsborough. Brooks and I went to Portugal in February of this year – so expect to see paintings drawn from that trip in 2016!

Please visit our website

Add your name and email to receive our HGA newsletter:

Intersections

Intersections postcardTWO PAINTERS AND A POTTER INTERSECT AT THE HILLSBOROUGH GALLERY OF ARTS

Chris Graebner, Jude Lobe and Garry Childs find INTERSECTIONS in paint, wax and clay, June 23rd through July 20th at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts.

For painter Chris Graebner, the most obvious reference of Intersections relates to travel. Says Graebner: “So much of my work comes directly from my travels. I’m constantly thinking about how I could paint a scene – technically, how to express what I’m looking at. I take loads of photos when I travel. Pictures from cars, from trains, from planes. They are not great pictures but they help me to be in the time and place where they were taken and to see things I might have missed or forgotten.”

Graebner finds, however, that the places she paints are generally from trips taken several years earlier – not the most recent ones. “Somehow, I’m not ready to paint what I’ve recently seen. I need some time and distance before I’m ready to paint a place. It takes a while to see which images stay with me and come to represent that place and time. The paintings in this show are from a number of  trips and many different places: Spain in 2011, Hong Kong in 2013, Wisconsin in 2011, Bois Blanc Island in 2012, Louisiana in 2009 and of course Hillsborough. My husband and I went to Portugal in January of this year – so expect to see paintings of the trip in 2016!”

For Jude Lobe, whose work for this show uses cold wax and oil, Intersections is the coming together of ideas. Says Lobe, “as a child, I loved to put together puzzles. It was fascinating to see how different elements fit together and changed the look of the individual piece that was now part of a whole. In school I discovered that this idea of inter-connectedness had a name – ecology.”

“The cold wax & oil medium I use lends itself to expressing this idea of inter-connectedness, or intersections, as well as evolution. It affords the opportunity to show a history of the painting. I build up layers of texture and color obscuring what’s beneath. At the same time, I remove parts of layers by scratching, scraping, applying solvents and so on. This reveals parts of past layers. The artwork then represents the history of a life, which becomes the compilation of bits and pieces of the experiences we traveled. It could be the life of a natural area, or architectural structure as well.”

For Garry Childs, who has been a potter for more than 40 years, Intersections has a more technical connotation. “In my thinking Intersections is about the intersection of form and surface, always a complicated issue for a potter. All of my work is made on the potters wheel. Form or shape that grows and expands from within is the essence of all of my pieces. Glazes and carving are used to emphasize the shapes and bring color and texture to the surface.” Childs’ designs are inspired from ancient South American, African and Mediterranean pottery and are of terra-cotta. He would like his pots to be used and enjoyed on a daily basis.

Intersections is about coming together. The artists invite you to come together and meet them at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. The show will run from June 23rd until July 20th.

Opening Reception

June 27th

6-9

The Fifth Element

Aside

Pat Lloyd

This past year presented some challenges that temporarily limited my ability to turn wood. I needed to find new ways to express my frustrated creativity. Woodturning was set aside, while photography took the lead. Then, a chance encounter led to my discovery of Kumihimo braiding and braided jewelry design, a rather unexpected turn I must say; strange twists and turns.

walnut bowl PLWhile in Oregon last fall, I visited the Portland Japanese Gardens. The guide pointed out a large Japanese stone lantern and described the 5 traditional elements in Japanese Buddhism of Earth, Water, Fire, Wind and Void. I was most intrigued by this Fifth Element of Void. Void represents spirit, thought, creative energy and inventiveness, the “here,” or the center.”

Kumi necklace PLOnce I let go of the need to control the uncontrollable and accepted the “here” and found my center, I was able to release the creative energy and inventiveness resident in my inner spirit, in that Fifth Element of Void. The discovery and exploration of the ancient art of Kumihimo braiding gave me a new voice.

Pat pig photoIn this new year, I am back to woodturning, with a renewed energy and passion. And, the discovery of Kumihimo that energized that creative emptiness last year, has taken on a life of its own. Kumihimo design is filled with endless possibilities. Of course, photography continues to influence my everyday life. Some days it is just hard to know what to do first, it’s such a blessing.