Deadline Sept. 15 !

HGA ImageResolutions 2015

Calling all North Carolina Artists!

The deadline to enter your artwork in the inaugural Hillsborough Gallery of Arts juried art show, Resolutions 2015, is September 15th.  North Carolina artists 18 and over working in 2D an 3D media are encouraged to apply.

The show will display in the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts featured exhibit gallery from January 5th through 25th of January 2015. An opening reception will be Friday, January 9th from 6-9 pm.

Awards juror for Resolutions 2015 will be Timothy Riggs, the Curator of Collections at the Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC.

This is an opportunity to share your work in an established and welcoming gallery and connect with new collectors and fellow artists.

Complete prospectus and application can be found at
 http://www.onlinejuriedshows.com/Default.aspx?OJSID=299 

Artists can also find a link from our website, 
http://HillsboroughGallery.com/juriedshow.html

Attention to Detail

Marcy Lansman

Unlike much of my previous work, many of the pieces in this show are non-representational. The unifying element is palette, which ranges from orange/rust/brown on the one hand through neutral warm gray to blue/blue-green/green on the other. My process has been to lay down a “first draft” quickly, in one sitting, restraining myself from any fussing or revising.   (Inevitably, at the end of this session I feel that I have created a masterpiece.) I let this draft sit for a day or so. When I go back, I discover that my masterpiece is not as flawlessly marvelous as it first seemed. Then I begin the long process of revising. The challenge now is to clean up the problems without sacrificing the freshness of the original. Here is where “attention to detail” comes in.

Free to Dream

I have been surprised to discover that I spend just as much time adjusting the details of non-representational as representational work. What’s different is the timing and the goal. When I am painting a flower or a face, I concern myself with details right from the start when I create the original drawing. In my more abstract work, I focus on major compositional issues at the beginning and deal with the details later. In the representational work, the goal of the details is to capture the appearance and the spirit of the thing I’m painting. In the non–representational work the goal is to create a piece that will be satisfying both to me and to the viewer, something that will please or stimulate or in some way enlighten.

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Attention to Detail

Linda Carmel

Having a Featured Artist show at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts is an opportunity to present a body of work. I love to work in series using different themes. For this show I have continued with my theme of Women in the World, using idioms as inspirations.

pillar-of-strength

This year I have bought more global influences into the mix. I have looked at style design details from around the world and have used them in each of the paintings in this series.   In some of the paintings you will see tartans and in some I have used designs based on African kuba cloth.   Some of the paintings were inspired by molas from Panama and some by Aboriginal dream paintings. Another is based on Asian silkscreen painting. These are the puzzle pieces I began with in each piece, women, cultural designs and idioms.

someone elses shoes

Even though I started each painting with this set of information it is the attention to the detail in the actual painting as it progresses that becomes dominant. My work is in finding the balance of color and form with the puzzle pieces that began the piece. Sometimes the women become the dominant part of the painting and in one case there are no women. In other paintings it is the design that dominates the piece.

I work with acrylic modeling paste that I form on canvas to create three-dimensional paintings. I want viewers to become intimate with the painting by feeling the contours of the surface.

cut-from-same-cloth

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Attention to Detail

 

Reader

Reader

Lynn Wartski

It has been interesting letting my work lead me in a direction I had not really considered.  A single mixed media figure sculpture for a group show has led to the creation of several dozen “art dolls”, and introduction of my work to a whole new audience. The intimate scale of these pieces invites the viewer in to take a closer look.  By their very nature these sculptures require that viewer and artist both pay “Attention to Detail”, the title of our newest feature show.

Ever present in all of my sculpture has been hand forged copper raised from flat stock. My art dolls pay homage to this with the face I create for each. Each doll’s face begins as a flat disk that I cut, anneal, hammer, shape and polish. The hands for each art doll are also formed in my metal studio, as are glass eyes created by torch firing enamels on to copper or brass tacks and nail heads. The addition of a wooden head and wire skeleton round out the basic form of these small figure sculptures and adds to the mixed media slightly steampunk flavor of my work.

doll with stick
The sources of inspiration for “who each doll will be”, are endless.  They have come into being both fully formed as a concept and design in my sketchbook, and formed wholly on the work table.

I enjoy the reactions they and their details draw from viewers.  These art dolls bring together so much that I have developed in my work over the years, and I look forward to where they lead me next.

 

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Attention to Detail

july postcard
There is a saying that artists know only too well, “the devil is in the details.” The smallest detail can sometimes totally transform a work of art. Although the approaches of artists Linda Carmel, Marcy Lansman and Lynn Wartski are very different, for each of them details are crucial.

Marcy Lansman, whose previous work included very detailed representational paintings, decided to go in a different direction. “Most of the pieces in this show are non-representational. The unifying element is their color palette, which ranges from orange/rust/brown on the one hand through neutral warm gray to blue/blue-green/green on the other. My process has been to lay down a “first draft” quickly in one sitting, restraining myself from any fussing or revising. Inevitably, at the end of this session I feel that I have created a masterpiece! I let this draft sit for a day or so. When I go back, I discover that my masterpiece is not as flawlessly marvelous as it first seemed. Then I begin the process of revising. The challenge then is to clean up the problems without sacrificing the freshness of the original. This is where ‘attention to detail’ comes in.”

Says Lansman, “I have been surprised to discover that I spend just as much time adjusting the details of non-representational as representational work. What is different is the timing and the goal. When I create a drawing, whether it is a flower or a face, I concern myself with details right from the start. In my more abstract work, I focus on major compositional issues at the beginning and deal with the details later. In the representational work, the goal of the details is to capture the appearance and the spirit of the thing I’m painting. In the non–representational work the goal is to create a piece that will be satisfying both to me and to the viewer, something that will please or stimulate or in some way enlighten.”

Lynn Wartski describes the use of detail in her figure sculptures: “For the past couple of years I have concentrated my efforts on small, mixed media figure sculptures that are referred to as ‘sculptural art dolls.’ The intimate scale of these pieces invites the viewer to take a closer look. By their very nature these sculptures require that I pay “attention to detail.”

“Some dolls start as sketches in a book and others are conceived entirely in the studio, but all begin construction with a bit of metalsmithing. Each doll’s face begins as a flat disk cut from copper stock that I anneal, hammer, cut and shape into a face. Eyes are created by torch firing glass enamels on copper or brass nails and tacks. I form the rest of my basic figure from a wooden sphere head atop a twisted wire skeleton. It is at this point that details start to emerge. What will the figure be doing? How will he or she be dressed? Will this be a doll that can live outside? The answers to these and other questions lead to the details that emerge for each figure. One may be simply dressed and seated with a book, another dressed in an ornate costume complete with jewels, and a third riding a bike made just for her.” Wartski enjoys the reactions they and their details draw from viewers. “These figures bring together so much that I have developed in my work over the years.”

Either women or idioms – or sometimes both – are common threads in much of Linda Carmel’s work. However, this year she has brought more global influences into the mix. “I have looked at style and design details from around the world and have used them in each of the paintings in this series,” says Carmel. “Women, cultural designs and idioms are the puzzle pieces I began with in each painting. Even though I started each one with a set of details in mind, it is the “attention to the detail” of the actual painting as it progresses that becomes central. My work is in finding a balance of color and form using those ‘puzzle pieces’ I began with.”

Carmel works with acrylic modeling paste to form three-dimensional paintings on canvas. “I want viewers to become intimate with the painting by feeling the contours of the surface” she says.

Opening Reception

July 25

6-9

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INTERSECTIONS – A Potter’s View

Garry'a vase

I am a Potter. A Craftsman. My art comes from a long term relationship between my materials, my tools and my heart.

My primary material is clay, Red Clay in particular. I got serious about red clay while throwing at a Pottery in Vass NC somewhere around 1980. At that time we were making a lot of large unglazed redware jardinieres, strawberry jars and such. Thick pots made fast from soft clay, not much refinement of shape there but I loved the way that clay felt running through my fingers and the earthy, almost swampy smell of it. Taking that most common of muds and learning what I can do with it is a process that began for me then and continues now.

All of my work is formed on a Potter’s Wheel. Potters have all manner of tools. Sticks, wires, cutters of all kinds, almost anything can be used for something in working with clay. The Wheel however, is another matter. It is an instrument. And like a musical one it takes many, many hours of daily practice and repetition to become proficient. I first sat down at a kick wheel in a high school art class in 1972 or maybe ’71, it’s getting hard to recall. I got hooked right away and have been trying to get good at it ever since.Garry at the wheel

It is very important to me that my work be accessible to people. I don’t make pots for art galleries or museums, I make them for people’s homes. My bowls and platters look best on tables with food being shared by families and friends, planters and vases with someones favorite herb or fresh flowers. Some pieces certainly are more decorative in nature. Those are an expression of my joy in the process and hopefully become a part of someones day to day life.

In my thinking “Intersections” is about the intersection of form and surface. Form or shape that grows and expands from within is the essence of all my pieces. Glazes and carving are used to emphasize the shapes and bring color and texture to the surface.

Garry Childs

garry@gcpots.com

919-724-1626

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LOOK DEEP INTO NATURE AND YOU WILL UNDERSTAND EVERYTHING BETTER

INTERSECTIONS, painting by Jude Lobe

INTERSECTIONS, painting by Jude Lobe

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better”, is a quote by Albert Einstein.

As a child, I loved to put together puzzles. It was fascinating to see how different elements fit together and changed the look of the individual piece that was now part of a whole. Intersections is the coming together of ideas, crossing, and bisecting. Through our lives we all intersect with each other, with nature, and with other cultures. These intersections effect us in multiple ways and help us thrive.  Some of the artworks are expressions of my ‘intersections’, others include different materials intersecting within the same artwork.”

Seeking Serenity, cold wax & oil by Jude Lobe

Seeking Serenity, cold wax & oil by Jude Lobe

My work for this show is predominately cold wax & oil and encaustics. Cold wax is a soft paste formulated to make oil paint colors thicker and more matte. It is made with beeswax, resin and mineral spirits. My technique in painting with cold wax & oil is a process of addition and subtraction.

Nature is my muse and the common thread through my work.  As a part of nature I believe we need to respect the connection we have with the natural environment. In nature things change, evolve. Like a forest goes through an ecological succession, so do we as individuals evolve and are at present a compilation of fragments and parts of the experiences we traveled. Cold wax & oil lends itself perfectly in expressing this idea. It affords the opportunity to show a history of the painting by building up layers, obscuring what’s beneath, and then removing sections of layers to reveal bits of past layers. The paintings represent the history of a life that becomes the compilation of bits and pieces of it’s past experiences.

My hope is that my paintings resonate with the viewer on an emotional level and makes one feel something. I attempt to capture how being out in nature makes me feel free and peaceful.

More of my work can be seen at the Hillsborough Gallery, Oil and Cold Wax  and my Jude Lobe art website. Click on any of the highlighted words to visit those sites.

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Longing for Tranquility,  painting by Jude Lobe

Longing for Tranquility, painting by Jude Lobe