Preview of the Orange County Studio Tour

OCAG_postcard_RGBPlease come join us for the Opening Reception at our Last Fridays celebration.

 

Please visit our website

 

Discoveries

gulfstream1

Mark Kinsella

Discoveries is probably the most apt name for my first featured artist show. I really feel that it’s symbolic of my process and of glass itself. All of the work for Discoveries is new and most of it was inspired by my love of water and flying. Lately I’ve found myself missing the ocean with the wide open skies and the lake where my grandparents retired in Massachusetts, and I’m drawing on the imagery of my memory.

Delta Green Detail

It is impossible for me to look at any glass without seeing in it the lens that it yearns to be.  And like any lens, it affords us a view of the other and of ourselves, and in that view an opportunity to discover the far away and the very close, the macro and the micro, the viewer and the artist.  In a very real sense, this lens combines at its focal point the creative experience of the maker with the observational experience of the viewer, allowing us both to discover a more complete artistic experience.  Looking through this lens, I can discover something transformational about the viewer, and the viewer can discover something equally new in me.

Delta Green

I often plan out a piece by starting with a color pallet or a shape that I am currently attracted to and let it evolve, or I will sketch out a pattern that I’ve seen in nature and try to adapt it to glass. It’s not uncommon for me to have a vision of a piece in my mind that I’ll sketch out and start working on only to have it morph into something totally different. It’s a discovery process that I just let happen as it needs to. I like to use transparent glass along with opaque glass so that there are little discoveries for a collector to find.

landlock

I find that I’m drawn to the process and technique as much as I am drawn to colors and textures of glass. I want my work to constantly evolve and grow. It’s important to me to not get stuck on one type or style and have my work be identified by a singular subject. When a collector of my work asks me “What’s next?” I want to be able to say “It’s like nothing I’ve ever done before!”

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

 

Discoveries

 Michele Yellin

Michelangelo said, “Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.” For me, searching the textured, abstracted, multi-colored surface of my canvas, I ache to discover what each painting wants to reveal to me, and thus become. This is my great challenge, and when detected and captured, my great joy. I have no luck in forcing things along. There are processes I rely on and yet I have no formula guaranteed to bring the painting into being. It is only with the alchemy of materials, skills, intent and some form of magic that allows me to discover what the painting’s true nature is. To see it, I have to not look for it, or rather look in an oblique manner, and then, if I am lucky, I make my discovery. These paintings are what were waiting in the paint to be painted.

 

wildthingbeginsIMG_3743

IMG_3755

 

In this painting, THERE IN THE WILD PLACE, I started by painting in big loopy letters “I have discovered”. I continued painting until the words were no longer visible. I really revel in this part of the process. It is so pleasant, just adding color here and there. When I finally finished the under-painting and begin looking, the hindquarter and one ear of the fawn were almost immediately revealed to me. That is kind of unusual. Typically it takes a lot of searching. And because it was unusual, it was a little bit hard to trust. I had seen 3 fawns in the last couple of months, but still…to have one show up so quickly in my abstract field of color? After some drawing and erasing on the canvas, I decided not to fight the fawn. If it wasn’t meant to be, that would become apparent. I continued on painting, adding paint and then painting over things I didn’t like. I usually take photos when I am creating a painting to help me with the process of figuring out what is working and what isn’t. The camera gives me a small image that is often easier to evaluate than the full size canvas. After many hours, I was very happy with the fawn and her surroundings, and she was THERE, IN THE WILD PLACE. She is there to remind me, she is always willing to take me away from ordinary domestic life. She offers a reprieve from all the chores that have yet to be done, and a path for me to rediscover my true self.

 

IMG_4095

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

Discoveries

Lolette Guthrie

My paintings are paintings of light and atmosphere. I strive to capture the ephemeral nature of light that captures a mood that is timeless.

 

softly

 

I mostly paint from memory arranging the elements to form interesting compositions. Regardless of whether it is a traditional landscape or an abstraction, I find myself seeing and feeling the space, light, time of day, temperature and weather in my mind’s eye and letting what is on the canvas direct my hand.   Each piece begins with a loose idea that evolves gradually and intuitively as I build up the surface layer by layer. I always have an idea of what I want to explore but invariably I find that the painting takes on a life of it’s own and I’m never sure where it will end up. This experience is both exhilarating and, at times, confusing. I think it must be much like the experience of a writer whose characters take over and force the direction of the story.

 

summersky

 

I work both in oils and pastels but always in the same way, by applying countless layers of pigment and allowing each layer to show through. This process gives a wonderful richness to the surface. In the case of pastels, I use a fixative between the layers so that each layer remains bright and doesn’t become muddy. To get the same result with oils, I must let each layer dry before the next is applied. I also move back and forth between landscapes and the abstractions based on those landscapes. I find switching gears in this way keeps me from “getting stuck”.

 

lookingoutwardlg

 

For this show, I concentrated on discovering how to paint an interesting sky that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather. In most pieces, the foreground is the accent note.

 

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

 

 

 

Discoveries

discoveries1Make New Discoveries At The Hillsborough Gallery Of Art

As a landscape painter, Lolette Guthrie seeks the essence of a place in order to create visual metaphors celebrating the incredible beauty and diversity of our world. “My paintings are always paintings of light and atmosphere” says Guthrie “and I strive to capture the ephemeral nature of light at a moment in time that transcends the subject and captures a mood that is timeless.”  Working in both oils and in pastels she applies countless layers of pigment one on top of the other, allowing each layer to show through, giving a wonderful richness to the surfaces.

For this show, Guthrie concentrated on painting skies that by themselves give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather. In most pieces, the foreground is the accent note.

Mark Kinsella has been working with glass for more than 10 years and continues to develop his technique. Incorporating new processes into his work, he is always evolving and changing, trying new styles, and producing fresh and different work. Kinsella draws inspiration from nature, movies and life experiences, using his photography background for interesting composition and color combinations. His work is sometimes functional, sometimes sculptural and often both.

Most of the work in this show will have a combination of transparent and opaque glass, which look very different depending on whether light is reflected off the surface or transmitted from behind. Says Kinsella, “Some of my work also contains optical illusions. Discoveries are possible in so many ways! I hope that everyone will pick up and touch the glass and feel its texture. I truly believe that working with glass is a metaphor for life. Things can be very random and seemingly disconnected but with patience, creativity, and a little hard work one can pull it all together into something beautiful. I’m motivated to leave the world in better shape than when I arrived and feel that I can do that by creating art that could possibly last hundreds of years.”

Michele Yellin has this to say about her work. “Michelangelo said that every block of stone has a statue inside it and that it is the task of the sculptor to discover it. For me, searching the textured, abstracted, multi-colored surface of my canvas, I ache to discover what each painting wants to reveal to me, and thus become. This is my great challenge, and when detected and captured, my great joy. I have no luck in forcing things along. There are processes I rely on and yet I have no formula guaranteed to bring the painting into being. It is only with the alchemy of materials, skills, intent and some form of magic that allows me to discover what the painting’s true nature is. To see it, I have to not look for it. I have look in an oblique manner, and then, if I am lucky, I make my discovery. These paintings are what were waiting in the paint to be painted.”

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

 

 

KINDRED

 Alice Levinson

Blogging after installing KINDRED

Child’s play aka a day in the studio

As I write this, my work fills the walls of the Featured Artist room in the gallery, as KINDRED takes its turn on exhibit. It is a wonderful feeling to look about that room and see the results of months of labor finally completed and ‘breathing’ in the light and air. The visual conversation is lively, warmed by the glow from Pringle Teetor’s blown glassworks.

———-But that was yesterday, today is a new day in the studio and time to begin again——-

 

Balnk Wall AL

I enter the studio and am faced with this, a blank composing wall, my blank canvas. The challenge of starting anew makes this my most difficult day in the studio. A journal offers notes, scribbled musings, quotations, clippings, gestural doodles. I sift through them looking for a thread of thought, a prick of curiosity, hoping for the ‘stroke of genius’ that never comes. I look to my ever-present corner of perennials  for visual stimulation.

inspiration point AL Some thematic thoughts are beginning to perk. I open the closet door and viola !!  The shelves overflow. Color, pattern, and texture delight my eye, invite my touch, and engage the creative muse. The process begins. The synergy between journaled musings and the visual array of the cloth yield a theme, visual motifs, a palette. A creative intention begins to take form. I reach for the cloth and the magic begins. The fabric is cut or torn and pieces are mixed and melded as I begin to assemble my work. Layer by layer the piece grows.

Stash AL It takes considerable effort to stay open and responsive to the ‘voice’ of the cloth, ‘listening’ with my hands as well as my eyes.   Placed around the studio are reminders: “NO RISK, NO ART”, “CREATIVE WORK = CHILD’S PLAY”. Most children are natural artists, engaging with their environment in a free, non-judging, creative manner. For me the key is to honor process and allow myself to respond freely, intuitively to the materials. Focusing on process rather than product, I find the wall is no longer blank.

Work Table ALThe next new work is underway.

Next comes experimentation, balanced with critical review and re-direction. The freedom of composing with pinned cloth elements which are easily shifted facilitates the work.

Pinned AL My IPad has become a key tool, documenting the process and allowing me to consider stitch-work compositional options with ease. Taking the piece to completion will take weeks. Working as I do, mostly with small bits of cloth that gradually are melded together. Stitching each section effects the tactile tone and integrity of the piece as a whole. As each section is incorporated to the growing ‘whole’, a layer of stitch-work ensues to further meld the elements together. The process is one of continual reflection, accommodation, and response from composition through execution. Layer upon layer of cloth elements, layer upon layer of stitch-work to make an integral whole. Then, finally, a moment when the piece is done. The piece is complete. People often ask, “How do you know when it’s finished?” My response, “Just listen.”

Enter softly AL

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

 

Kindred

If There Is A Will, There Is A Way

Pringle Teetor Blog

Pringle's boot

When we opened our studio for the 8th season last fall (our season is October through June), I thought that this year might be a good year to slow down and enjoy life a little more instead of working so hard. Maybe do just a few shows, spend time taking better care of myself, get in better shape……..well, that didn’t work!

The 2014 winter was full of ups and downs. Temperatures went way way down and propane prices doubled. Color prices went up since metal prices went up. We had the snow storms, ice storms, power outages, including one that kept us out of our home and in a hotel for over a week with 2 dogs, one who was very ill (has since passed on) and oh! I fell down and broke my ankle in February. But I didn’t know it for about a month. Then it started hurting. A lot. I finally went to the doctor who put me in this boot cast for 2 1/2 months. I was out of the studio another month, then when I finally felt comfortable enough to blow glass in a boot cast, I realized how little time I had left before we shut down for the summer. PANIC! Working alone with the boot on my foot I knew there were some things I would not be able to do by myself so I had to improvise – think of a new way to make what I wanted to make before we shut down for the summer.

pineapple techniqueI had always been fascinated with the use of a bronze “pineapple” or “diamond” optic mold to put patterns of bubbles in glass.   It is a very tricky tool to learn to use. The mold has diamond shaped points on the inside that one you blow into it with molten glass on the end of your pipe, it leave diamond shaped dents in the glass. When you gather another layer of glass over these dents, it leaves perfectly placed air bubbles in your glass. The trick is getting out of the mold once you go in – it is very easy to get the molten glass on the end of your pipe stuck in this mold. Your shape and temperature have to be “just right”! I spent a lot of time practicing with this tool! I wanted to use this tool as a way to make my rolling wine decanters interesting without the use of an assistant in the studio. I only have either of my partners on weekends and I work alone during the week so I thought this would be nice. This led to more bubble pieces, rolling bubble glasses, bowls and more. Fun with Bubbles!

Bubbles

My love of chemical reaction between colors with high gold and silver content is a mainstay in my work. Many of the bowls I make are made using the same colors and technique every time I make them yet they each come out different. These pieces just glow under a good halogen spotlight!

chemical reaction

Dreams also played an important roll in this years work. One of my series of pieces that resemble clouds against the earth as seen from the space station uses colors that are stiff and soft together, which does interesting things in molten glass. The stiff glass doesn’t melt in as much and tends to hold its shape instead of melting into the other colors. They can be used to write down your dreams and put them inside. This could be for daydreams or night dreams, hopes or wishes.

dreams in clouds

The yarn ball series started out as a color test – to see how a stiff color looked if it was wrapped around a softer color. Black and white pieces are traditionally difficult because black is extremely soft, and white is very stiff. By this I mean they melt at different temperatures – the black will be soupy runny glass while the white stays stiff longer. It can be quite a frustrating and challenge experience! So of course I had to try working these two colors together. It was fun thinking of interesting and striking combinations.

glass yarn ball

I ended up having surgery on my ankle in early July. This was usually the time I  do my “cold work” which is the wet grinding and polishing of the pieces to smooth punty marks or flatten bottoms of vases. I do this in my back yard workshop only during the summer, as it is not possible to heat for working during the winter.   Once the surgical cast was removed after 2 weeks, another non-weight bearing cast was placed on my leg for 4 more weeks. Plus, I was told not to get the cast wet. Or sweat in it. It wasn’t coming off until the same day the show was going up in the gallery. You know the old saying “if there is a will, there is a way”? Thank you Harrison Ford (yes, the actor) for breaking your leg and allowing yourself to be photographed using this device (Iwalk Free). It worked for me too!

 

Pringle at her show

Photo by Susan Hope

 

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website