Three Perspectives

Eric Saunders, Fine Art Photographer

Artist Statement

My subject matter is outdoor landscapes, natural and urban, in color or black and white. I sometimes explore other subjects (artifacts and architecture), and digital enhancement or manipulation of images.

There is no particular story line to my work. I am trying to communicate the beauty of abstract art, and the beauty or intrigue of transient moments in nature and life.

I am mostly self-taught as a photographer. This makes my progress slower than I would like at times, because I listen to all advice, regardless of its merit.

Previously I studied classical piano, and then worked as a corporate computer programmer. I find inspiration for my images in music of all styles and eras; my work experience in computers has enabled me to learn digital darkroom techniques more easily.

All work had been using 35mm film using a NIKON 6006 and NIKON lenses (with a tripod most of the time). In April, 2010 I purchased my first digital SLR, a NIKON D700 (which uses the same lenses as my old film SLR).

I print my images using an Epson 3880 printer, using paper and inks archival to at least 100 years.

 

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Three Perspectives

LOLETTE GUTHRIE

Three Perspectives

I am primarily a landscape painter. I paint largely from memory striving to discover the essence of the subject rather than the reality. I want to capture the ephemeral nature of light and a mood that is timeless. Resonant color is the core of my process. I juxtapose passages of saturated color with more muted tones and through the application of many layers of pigment and glaze I try to create subtle color and value shifts that provide a degree of luminosity.

As Skyfire Rages Across the Atlantic

For this show, I again concentrated on painting an interesting sky that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of place, time of day, temperature, and weather. In most pieces, the foreground is almost an afterthought. In a few, I explored the idea of reality versus the abstraction of memory through the use of “trompe l’oeil” elements that focus attention on the remembered landscape within. When one looks at the sky, one sees refracted light and reflected colors not the reality of colorless air and moisture. Is, therefore, a painting of a landscape or skyscape “real” or is it more like an abstracted memory or a dream of reality?

Reality is Just an Illusion

Before I started to write this statement, I spent some time looking at what I had produced. As always, I had begun each piece with a general idea of what I was interested in exploring. As usual, I was never certain about where each painting would go. To my surprise, when I looked at the whole collection, I realized that while my intention had been simply to create interesting, evocative pieces, I saw in the cloudy, stormy, tumultuous skies that I had actually been working out on canvas my feelings about these troubled times. I also noticed hopefulness since I had left in hints of clearing skies.

 

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Three Perspectives

Pringle Teetor

The pieces I created for this show came out of frustration and boredom. Seriously! When two artists work together in a glass studio for years on end but only one day a week, you tend to fall into a pattern of “normalcy”. We just get used to doing the same things, creating the same type of pieces because we want to make the most of the “bench time”.

One morning on the way to the studio, my partner Dana and I were discussing my frustration with a certain color application I had been trying to figure out how to do by myself. He mentioned watching an artist many years ago at Corning Museum of Glass layer small bits of different colors together. He had the assistant bringing each color to him one at a time, fully melted, as he piled on color on top of another, like building an ice cream cone with many layers. But instead of then blowing the piece directly from this pile of color, he then turned it on a different axis and created the piece. Since I mostly work by myself, I had not considered this!

We played with this technique that day, piling 5-10 colors together and took this one step farther by flattening the blown piece. Flattening a round glass form is something that is better done with an assistant and we had not done any flat pieces in several years. Inspiration was reborn!

The next week I came in determined to do the “color sundaes” by myself. I took it a bit farther by layering 15 -25 colors together. My interest in the chemistry of glass color took over and I would add strings of other colors here and there. I wanted to use colors that reacted differently to the one next to it to create interesting effects. Once these “sundaes” were created, they were removed from the pipe and annealed for the next time Dana and I worked together. So, before the final piece, hours of work had already gone into the creation of just the colors.

Since glass colors doesn’t always play well together, it became quite a challenge. Some colors remain stiffer when molten, while others would be so hot that they would blow thinner than the rest of the colors. During the flattening process (using large cork paddles) the glass is compressed under pressure and if there is a spot that is too thin or too hot, it could be disastrous. The colors were sandwiched to create the effect of an abstract painting, which brought me back to painting roots, many years before glass, bringing together the past and the present in a creative way. I hope you enjoy these pieces!

 

 

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Three Perspectives

Lolette Guthrie writes, “I am primarily a landscape painter, however, my viewpoint is different from plien air painters in that I paint largely from memory striving to discover the essence of the subject rather than the reality.  I want to capture the ephemeral nature of light and a mood that is timeless. This has led to increasingly simplified/spare landscapes and at times abstractions derived from them. Resonant color is the core of my process. I juxtapose passages of saturated color with more muted tones and through the application of many layers of pigment and glaze I try to create subtle color and value shifts that provide a degree of luminosity.

For this show, I concentrated on painting an interesting sky that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather. In most pieces, the foreground is almost an afterthought.  In a few, I explored the idea of reality and abstraction through the use of trompe l’oeil painting. When one looks at the sky, one sees refracted light and reflected colors not the reality of colorless air and moisture. Is, therefore, a painting of a recognizable object, landscape or skyscape real?  Or is it more like an abstracted memory or dream of reality?”

Photographer Eric Saunders writes of his new work, “With my photographs I try to communicate the beauty and intrique of abstract art, and transient moments in nature and life. I look to outdoor landscapes, natural and urban, and capture them in color, or black and white.

I am mostly self-taught as a photographer. Previously I studied classical piano, and then worked as a corporate computer programmer. My goal as a photographer is to “see” abstract compositions and communicate them with precise technical control. I shoot in RAW, and edit using Adobe Bridge and Photoshop CS5. I print my images using an Epson 3880 printer.”

Glass artist Pringle Teetor is constantly mesmerized by the dance of color, light, and fluidity in glass. Teetor states, “My forms are mostly functional vessels, but this year I have created pieces with a more sculptural form in mind.  My new flattened vases capture multiple colors and are like abstract paintings in glass. I like to play with the chemistry of color to produce unique effects in each piece of blown glass. Then, I incorporate copper, silver and gold to create new reactions between the glass layers.  The results are not always predictable, but the outcomes are often exciting.”

Opening Reception
Friday
August 25
6-9
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Serious Fun

 

Ali Givens

For Serious Fun I’ve worked on refining several fabric collages that I began years ago. For some pieces, such as “Orange Peacock” I removed the strongest element, the peacock, from the original quilt and built an entirely new composition. In the new collage a cityscape becomes the backdrop as the the peacock stands in front searching among the rocks.  In another work, “Long Afternoon” I simplified the colors to create a completely new feeling. The original background was bright orange, but by replacing it with a more muted gray I was able to make all of the other colors come alive. I think sometimes you have to look at something a long time to figure it out–it’s like a puzzle. Fabric is wonderfully forgiving which makes it very fun as a medium–the more I work with it, the more I’ve learned to relax during the process. For this show I’ve also revisited my favorite theme: the still life.

Especially fun and challenging for me was incorporating my own interpretations of my fellow artists’ paintings and pottery as elements in my own collages. I have a beautiful vase by Garry Childs in my living room. It sits in the corner full of curly willow branches next to a very old stained glass window. Each morning when I sit on the sofa drinking my coffee, I stare at that corner–it became a still life in my mind. I first made a drawing of these elements, the vase, the window, the brick wall and the table. I then made a small collage with fabric to work out the details. Then, from that small collage, I was able to blow it up to a much larger size. This process works well for me. I love images that are small and intimate, and also images that are very large and bold. “Ode to Garry’s Vase” was challenging collage, but one that I truly enjoyed because of personal connection (Garry is also an artist at HGA). Being inspired by my friends is always fun, serious fun.

 

 

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Serious Fun

 Michele Yellin

When I first considered creating work for this exhibit along the theme of SERIOUS FUN, I thought, “Serious Fun? Easy! My Artwork has a lot of joy in it. I can do this, just work in my usual way. The serious part? Well, I work hard and take my painting practice seriously so, I’ve got this.” And began…

Wheresoever You Go, Go With All Your Heart

This painting Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart, has that saying by Confucius painted into the first layer of the underpainting. That has been my process for several years now, and I love it. It’s like meditating on a mantra, and often, the final image relates to what is written in the hidden layer. This was the first  painting I completed for the exhibit.

After I finished that painting, I was given a new tool that draws thin black lines. Then, I decided to add 5 new colors to my palette. I had not changed my palette in at least 6 years, so that was an interesting change for me. I could mix those into any number of new colors. Not long after that, I learned a new painting process and purchased 2 rubber painting blades to use with that new technique. Within the space of a couple of months, I had all these new things to work with.  I incorporated all these elements and that’s when everything changed for me. The infusion of all these new components took me to a place of real play.

7 Mile Bridge

I became unattached to the final image and much more immersed in the process of playing with color, tone and shape. What came out of this experience is a result of all those new elements, as well as a feeling in me that all I needed to  do was to keep working and playing, and trust the experience. And I will tell you something for nothing, creating paintings in this way, for me, has been serious fun. Seriously.

Serious Fun-Sugar Wants to Play

www.micheleyellin.com

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Serious Fun

 

 

Nell Chandler

For our show Serious Fun I found myself in a few different modes. First I wanted to reach back to my earlier mostly narrative line but add a more light a airy feel to it. I worked with copper and my etched brass but added a hinged sterling component to it.

I also got inspired by a collaborative piece I did with Pringle Teeter when she asked me to make a chain for her Hunter’s Globe in our All about the Story Exhibit. The more the world around me seemed to becoming unhinged the more obsessed I became with hinges and I made a couple of necklaces and bracelets that were created mostly of hinges. I loved the light and airy feel they have.

Then I got in a mood to work on some of my serious work of a more tailored line. I felt like I was searching for some sort of stability.

All the while I was reading books, magazines and watching tutorials on how to fire enamel during the slow times on my shifts at the gallery. I have wanted to learn torch enameling for a long time. I began ordering the things I knew I would need and one day I sat down with my book and began experimenting. I loved it from the first firing I did! I found I could mix my light and airy component to the sturdy and stable piece of enamel and find a comfortable balance.

I loved the way my friends and family and gallery folks reacted to my newest line at our opening! I loved that so many people wanted to try it on and hold it in their hands. And having my exhibit along with Ali Givens and Michele Yellin, with all their big bold happy colors made our title Serious Fun fit perfectly into the space..