Lolette Guthrie: REFLECTIONS EXHIBIT

lolette's blog

I paint largely from memory so my paintings are always reflections on what I have experienced, however, for this show I concentrated on exploring both the physical idea of reflections of sky in water and my reflections on what it felt like to be in a particular place at a particular time.

Because the light quality at a particular time of day, the temperature or the season are so much a part of my memories, my paintings are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I strive to capture the ephemeral nature of light that creates a mood that is timeless. I always begin a piece with a general idea of time and place. I then sketch in the geometry and let go letting the painting tell me what it wants to become. At some point the piece always takes on a life of its own so I am never sure what the end result will be. Long interest in composition, geometry, color relationships and the edges of a piece has led to increasingly simplified/spare landscapes and often to abstractions derived from these landscapes.

afternoon

Much of my work is a reflection on time spent on the tiny island of Ocracoke, NC. Located at the southernmost tip of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore it is bounded on one side by Pamlico Sound with its beautiful and vitally important marshes and on the other, the Atlantic Ocean, thirteen miles of pristine beaches and the magic of the ever-changing sea. Ocracoke is a place to heal, to relax and to find one’s center. Paradoxically, it is also where I go to get reenergized, where I feel most alive, where I find inspiration.  ~ Lolette Guthrie

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Reflections

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Artists Lolette Guthrie, Alice Levinson and Evelyn Ward are featured this month at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. They will be showing their newest work in an exhibit titled

“Reflections.”

Painter Lolette Guthrie states that for “Reflections she explored through her paintings both the physical idea of reflections of sky in water and her own reflections on what it felt like to be in a particular place at a particular time. Her long interest in composition, color relationships and the edges of paintings has led to increasingly simplified/spare landscapes and to abstractions derived from these landscapes. She will be exhibiting both oil paintings and pastels.

Guthrie writes, “I paint largely from memory, so my paintings are always reflections on what I have experienced. Because the light quality at a particular time of day, the temperature and the season are so much a part of my memories, my paintings are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I strive to capture the ephemeral nature of light to creates a mood that is timeless. I begin a piece with a general idea of time and place and let the painting tell me where and how far to go. At some point the painting always takes on a life of its own so I am never sure what the end result will be.

Many of Guthrie’s pieces are reflections on time spent on the tiny island of Ocracoke, NC. Located at the southernmost tip of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, it is bounded on one side by Pamlico Sound with its beautiful and vitally important marshes, and on the other by the Atlantic Ocean, thirteen miles of pristine beaches and the magic of the ever-changing sea. Says Guthrie, “It is a place to heal, to relax and to find one’s center. Paradoxically, it is also where I go to get reenergized, where I feel most alive, where I find inspiration.”

Textile artist Alice Levinson will be exhibiting her non-traditional sewn clothworks. Levinson writes, “My work generally begins with fragments of thoughts or memories, jotted in a verbal ‘sketchbook.’ This text suggests visual motifs and choice of technique as I move toward the work.”

I have looked at ‘Reflections’ as a metaphor. Just as our image, reflected in a mirror is refracted through the medium of light, so past experiences are seen as refracted through the prism of time. Memories, recollections are transformed through time as new experiences and novel circumstances influence our sense of the familiar.” Levinson explains that she began her work for this exhibit by “looking back to earlier techniques, to materials previously used. Moving ahead, I experimented with new ways of using these familiar processes and tools. At times actually starting with remnants of an earlier effort and turning it on its head to yield a new direction. The clothworks in this exhibit are the result of this exercise. Each piece has its inception in the familiar elements, yet each represents an exploration beyond the known and practiced toward the new.”

“Visual motifs primarily derive from nature” continues Levinson, “which provides a major source of inspiration for my work. Color and movement are primary features. In each piece, hand dyed fabric has been layered and densely sewn. Occasionally I add bits of vintage cloth remnants to add visual and textural interest – as you might add spices to enhance a stew. Sewing, both machine and hand stitching, is my principal construction medium. I work to meld the disparate pieces of cloth into an integral whole, unifying them with lines drawn of stitching and multicolored thread.”

Potter Evelyn Ward will be showing her salt-fired pottery. She writes that her work for this show is an outgrowth of reflections on her frequent walks outdoors and time spent working in her garden. Ward states “I will largely be exhibiting functional pieces such as vases, pitchers and bowls that incorporate my hand-drawn decals. These decals are made from drawings inspired by the time spent in my garden and on frequent walks. I love to draw the plants and flowers I encounter; I don’t try to reproduce nature but rather try to find the essence of my subjects. This process forces me to slow down and reflect as I search out the essential elements.”

Ward’s functional pottery is made to be used. She hopes her work will add enjoyment to people’s lives, whether it’s a bowl used to serve food at a family celebration or the quiet respite a cup of coffee in a handmade mug can bring.

Please join us for an opening Reception

Friday July 31

6-9

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Not Alone

2nd try
Garry Childs
My work is formed on a potters wheel from terra-cotta clay. I glaze my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather hard”. This is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not yet completely dry. Several coats of one or more glazes are then applied onto the piece, usually by spraying. I sometimes add more colors by brushing and spraying pigments over the glaze.  I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns that you see on my pots.  After completely drying, the pieces are fired in a gas kiln to 2,125 degrees.
Although the shapes and form of my work is always of primary concern to me, the pieces I’ve done for this show have a heightened emphasis on color. I am constantly tweaking my glaze formulas in order to make subtle changes in hue and texture.  This time I have also used two completely new colors in the show. One is a sky blue overspray that I apply over another glaze. It has a nice, almost lacy texture when applied at just the right thickness.
The red glaze on my red and black pieces is also a new color. I have periodically experimented with reds over the past several years and am very happy with my newest results. This particular formula seems to be working very well. It utilizes one of the new commercially available red stains that can be used at much higher temperatures than this type of red could normally be fired. Combining this color with the black is particularly effective with a bit of carving in the black areas that lets the earthy red of the clay show through.
Pottery is made with hands and should be “looked at” with hands. I want everyone who sees  my work in this show or anywhere else to feel free to touch, pick up and handle the pots. Texture is very important and the curves the of shapes are very tactile. Try it, you’ll see.
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Not Alone: Mark Kinsella dIscusses the featured artist show

Interview with artist Mark Kinsella about his art and inspiration for the featured artist show Not Alone at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts June 26 – July 26, 2015.

Dermal ArmorDermal Armor DetailMonks at the Forest

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Not Alone

Marcy Lansman

I started the “Not Alone” series two years ago. Looking at an abstract landscape I had painted, I saw, in my mind’s eye, people walking up a hill. In the painting based on that image, the background was light at the top fading to almost black at the bottom, and the figures were silhouetted against that background. Painting it, I started with the figures at the bottom with the idea that this was some kind of forced march. They hung their heads as though burdened with grief. But as I moved upwards, the figures became less beaten down. The last figure I painted was a little girl gesturing to an old man as if to say, “Come on! Let’s go.” That little girl always brought tears to my eyes. She appears in many paintings in the series.

Not Alone

Several other paintings in the “Not Alone” series have similar themes: people move upwards across the page, sometimes alone, sometimes in groups, but always following in each other’s footsteps.

In “Moving on,” the figures seem to be carrying their belongings with them. They appear against a background of bombed out buildings, suggesting that they are refugees fleeing a war zone.

Moving On

In “Help Along the Way” groups of dark figures are guided by lighter figures, as though the memory of a friend or family member or some kind of spirit were guiding them.

Help Along the Way

More than with other work I’ve done, the ideas for these paintings have come to me unbidden. The series title “Not Alone” alludes to the idea that we are all on the same journey. In some ways we are alone, but in many other ways we are accompanied by others and guided by those who have gone before.

 

 

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Not Alone

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Together Three Hillsborough Gallery Artists Explore Being Not Alone

 

Three unique artists are featured this month at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Fused glass artist Mark Kinsella, potter Garry Childs and painter Marcy Lansman will be exhibiting their newest work in a show entitled “Not Alone.”

 

Mark Kinsella writes that Not Alone is an appropriate title for an art exhibit. Says Kinsella, “The process of creating can be a solitary endeavor but once the work is complete it moves into to the realm of not alone. If you happen to be in a gallery looking at a piece of art and you are the only one in the room, you are not alone. The artist will always have a presence in the room and you will be sharing their vision and experience. You are also sharing the space with the artist’s muse, whether the muse was a person, event, or nature. So you see, not alone is what you are when viewing the art; and not alone is what the artist has created, intentionally or not.”

“My work is sometimes functional, sometimes sculptural, or some pieces can be both depending on the preferences of the collector. I’m inspired by nature, images in movies, life experiences and I draw on my photography background to help with composition and color combinations.”

“I’ve been working with glass for more than 10 years and I’m still developing my technique. I am not beholden to one type of process but try to incorporate all that I’ve learned into my work. I’m always evolving and changing, trying new styles, and producing different and fresh work.”

“I truly believe that working with glass is a metaphor for life. Things can be very random and seemingly disconnected but with patience, creativity, and a little hard work, one can pull it all together into something beautiful. I’m motivated to leave the world in better shape than when I arrived and feel that I can do that by creating art that could possibly last for hundreds of years.”

“Not Alone also aptly describes Garry Childs philosophy as a potter. He writes, “It is very important to me that my work be accessible. My pots are intended for people’s homes. My bowls and platters look best on tables with food being shared by families and friends, my planters and vases with someone’s favorite herb or fresh flowers. Some pieces are certainly more decorative in nature than others. Those are an expression of my joy in the process that hopefully becomes a part of someone’s day-to-day life.”

“All of my work is formed on the potter’s wheel from terra-cotta clay. I apply glazes to my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather-hard” that is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not completely dry. I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns seen on my work.”

“While the shape and form of my pots continues to be my primary interest, I will be introducing some new work in this show. Color and pattern are used for emphasis. I will also be taking the opportunity to bring in more of my larger pieces than I usually have on display at the gallery.”

In writing about her approach to this show, Marcy Lansman writes, “Looking at a dark landscape I had painted, I imagined silhouetted figures walking up a hill. That image inspired Not Alone, the first in a series of paintings in which silhouetted figures, some alone, some in groups, move in a common direction as if toward a common goal. The works in this exhibit, also entitled Not Alone,” are a further exploration of that original idea. In one, figures burdened with bundles and suitcases walk solemnly against a background of crumbling buildings. In another, the figures look upward, seemingly drawn toward a brighter place. All are a contemplation of the journeys we share and the sense in which we make these journeys alone or with others.

Please join us for a Reception

June 26th

6-9

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Our Art is…

_20150603_143610Pat Merriman

When I paint it is always with my favorite themes…this time I have revisited Koi on very different sized panels, 10×30 that allows them to swim up or downstream with glints of gold, unusual fun colors and playful acrylic textures.

_20150603_143127Then there are always one of two Hillsborough or NC scenes.

_20150603_143530And finally I am honoring my love of cooking by painting vegetables, fruits, and cooking scenes from my kitchen, dining spaces or cocktail spaces.

 

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