Present Tense

Queen Mother -blog

 

Linda Carmel

 

This is a time in history when women are entering the workplace with qualifications equal to men. Women have the expertise to have full and satisfying careers. Having a family has become a choice not an expectation. I find myself reflecting on my evolving understanding of what it means to be a women in today’s society and how this affects the family structure as we know it.

 

Dairy Queen- blog

In this series of paintings I wanted to celebrate inherent female strengths, as mothers, peacemakers, nurturers and keepers of the home. Many of the women in this series are portrayed as queens, in some cases regal as in Queen Mother and others more “tongue in cheek” as in Homecoming Queen, Dairy Queen and Queen Bee. I have included a couple of “future queenstoo. My Little Princess explores our desire to keep our young ones safely protected in the nest. The painting Work In Progress deals with adolescence. I have included phases within the painting that track the journey towards adulthood from “hold me”, to the beginnings of self in “I want” to “you can’t make me” and finally “I am me” and “This is my life”.

My Little Princess-blog

My paintings are sculpted with acrylic modeling paste and then painted, creating a three dimensional surface. In some of the pieces I have experimented with some new materials. Queen of the Universe and Home Keeper are painted on a surface of rice paper that is overlaid onto modeling paste. My Little Princess is drawn with colored pencil in between layers of matte gel medium.

 

 

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Present Tense

TLC

Three Hillsborough Gallery Artists Work In The Present Tense

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts showcases the work of painters Linda Carmel and Chris Graebner and glassblower Pringle Teetor in its September Featured Artist Exhibit.

While each of these three artists has a very different style, for this exhibit they produced work focused on the “present tense.”

For painter Linda Carmel working in the present tense meant rediscovering and revising a theme that has been at the core of her work for some time. Over the last few years Carmel’s work focused on women. For Present Tense she originally planned to move her attention to other subjects that interested her, but every painting she tried was a struggle – and time was ticking by. She finally gave in and started to “play” on a blank canvas without worrying about direction or outcome. Women re-emerged as subjects but they emerged in their “present tense” as queens. Most of the women in this series are single figures who are at the “top of their game.” Although regal, some of the titles and figures have a playful element.

Carmel’s paintings are sculptural, three-dimensional works that she encourages the viewer to touch in order to fully appreciate the intricacies of the surface. She builds up her canvases with acrylic modeling paste using a variety of tools.

Painter Chris Graebner remarks that Present Tense would be an appropriate title for any current show of her art. “My work is constantly moving, changing, evolving. I try new things; some become part of my regular process, some don’t.” Her paintings for this show explore different surfaces and different methods of applying paint. Some of the paintings are on canvas or linen, some are on wood panel and some are done on clayboard. “Each of these surfaces accepts paint differently so that combining their specific properties with different types of brushes, painting knives and painting mediums produces entirely different results. A great deal of thought goes into each piece long before I actually apply paint to surface. After I select the image I want to work with, I must decide the painting’s size, the surface I want to work on, the color palette and the types of brushes and mediums I will use. I then map out a direction and begin, but I find that as I work, the painting finds its own course and often flows in channels I had not anticipated.”

Graebner is a night person. She says, half-jokingly, that the only time she sees the dawn is just before she goes to bed. “My biological clock has always tilted in that direction and my creativity doesn’t usually flow until after 6pm. It’s not surprising, therefore, that I’ve painted dozens of sunsets and night-themed paintings.” This show features a number of both. ‘Under the Moonlight,’ painted on panel, is of the ocean in moonlight. “Last winter my husband and I spent a week in a high-rise on the beach. The moon was full and watching the play of the light on the waves, simply magical. I used mop brushes and many thin layers of paint to capture my sense of that light.”

According to glassblower Pringle Teetor, Present Tense is the perfect title for an exhibit featuring an artist who works with a material that is a liquid at 2100° Fahrenheit.  She explains, “You can’t just stop what you are doing, put it aside and come back to it later. You have to work in the moment.”

“I love playing with colloids!” says Teetor “My favorites are colors containing copper, silver and gold. For years I’ve been making pieces containing gold and silver colloids that produce luscious shades of blue and red combined in just the right way to create beautiful hues. At Dana’s suggestion, I researched the chemistry of the various glass colors produced by the two German companies who supply the glassblowing industry. I wound up choosing two colors that are undoubtedly the softest and most difficult colors to work with! It is critical that the piece be heated slowly and carefully because by the time it is hot enough to blow and manipulate, it can easily end up as a puddle on the floor. Another danger is that uncontrolled shifts in temperature can cause changes in oxidation that alter the colloidal coloring. Furthermore, if you let these colors get too hot, the tiny particles of gold will coalesce into large aggregates that take on a disagreeable ‘liver color.’ You must layer the colors in a very particular way in order to get the best results. It required a lot of practice tests, but I am really amazed by the results.”

Teetor underwent cataract surgery in January. “While I had heard from many people that my color vision would be very different after surgery, I was still surprised,” she remarked. “I had no idea how much I had been missing. Since the surgery, colors appear much brighter and more intense than before. One day I noticed the beautiful array of color rods in my supply of glass and decided to try something I’ve wanted to do for many years – a multiple incalmo piece using all hues of the spectrum.” Incalmo is the technique of constructing an object, usually a vessel, by fusing two or more blown glass elements. “It was a long process of designing and blowing each section, cutting, cooling and grinding them until the edges were clean and polished, heating them back up to 1050° F in an oven, and then picking up each section one at a time and fusing them together. The results were thrilling. I made two pieces, one using twelve sections and another using eighteen!”

Opening Reception

Aug 28

6-9

 

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Reflections

Evelyn Ward

I make salt fired pots and add hand-drawn decals to them. Salt firing is a process in which regular salt is put into the kiln at the top temperature. The salt travels with the flame and adheres to the pots making a distinctive clear mottled glaze on the surface of the pots. Each pot is a little different depending on its location in the kiln.

I make my decals by starting with a drawing and then scanning it into the computer and printing it out on special decal paper. The iron in the toner leaves an image when the pot is refired to a lower temperature than the first glaze firing. I like the interplay between the very controlled surface of the decal and the less controlled surface of the salt firing.

For this show I focused on more delicate drawings than usual. Until recently, the drawings I’ve used have been high contrast ensuring the decals would show up after they were fired. But this spring I experimented with pencil drawings and I was very happy with the resulting images. I was able to see all of the gray tones even after they were fired. So with that in mind I did some new drawings with that softer more delicate feel. I love drawing botanical subjects, I spend a lot of time in my garden and on frequent walks with my dogs and am always amazed at how diverse plant life is. Almost every time I go out I find that some new plant will catch my eye.

 

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Alice Levinson – REFLECTIONS Exhibit

 From the Composing Wall to the Gallery Wall

and steps along the way:

Alice Levinson

For me, each new work grows from a kernel of inspiration: a line read, a song heard, dawn’s shy brilliance, trees bent in the wind, a quiet moment woods walking. A theme is developed, visual elements are chosen and the tangible work of composing a piece begins.

Composing the piece, ANGELS CAN FLY BECAUSE THEY TAKE THEMSELVES LIGHTLY, was a particular delight. It began with a particualrly striking length of dyed cloth. A happy result from the dye studio, it was beautifully variagated with blues, yellows, and greens. It suggested to me an expanse of sky light by the sun and flitered through spring-green leaves.

I decided to use it uncut as a background and build a composition where negative space, the space between elements, would be a primary to the design. I chose a familiar calligraphic motif of ideographic units to build an image that expressed joy, freedom, and movement.

And so the work began, incrementally adding unit to unit, guided by color, scale, pattern, and shape, with much experiementation and reflection, then correction, the work slowly took shape. My work is built on a composing wall, each piece pinned with or to the next. I rely upon my Ipad for frequent photos to document the process and allow me to ‘audition’ elements and segments as the work progresses. In assembling the workI enjoy ‘weaving’ the elements together, layering them over and under in an alternating rhythm. Periodically, segments are stitched to one another, and to the background. Each layer of stitching affects the physical tone of the textile, influencing the shape, dimensions of the ultimate outcome. Further stitching, both hand and machine, is added for texture, embellishment, and to meld the disparate elements into an integrated whole, underscoring the movement and thematic intention of the work. ~ Alice Levinson

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Lolette Guthrie: REFLECTIONS EXHIBIT

lolette's blog

I paint largely from memory so my paintings are always reflections on what I have experienced, however, for this show I concentrated on exploring both the physical idea of reflections of sky in water and my reflections on what it felt like to be in a particular place at a particular time.

Because the light quality at a particular time of day, the temperature or the season are so much a part of my memories, my paintings are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I strive to capture the ephemeral nature of light that creates a mood that is timeless. I always begin a piece with a general idea of time and place. I then sketch in the geometry and let go letting the painting tell me what it wants to become. At some point the piece always takes on a life of its own so I am never sure what the end result will be. Long interest in composition, geometry, color relationships and the edges of a piece has led to increasingly simplified/spare landscapes and often to abstractions derived from these landscapes.

afternoon

Much of my work is a reflection on time spent on the tiny island of Ocracoke, NC. Located at the southernmost tip of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore it is bounded on one side by Pamlico Sound with its beautiful and vitally important marshes and on the other, the Atlantic Ocean, thirteen miles of pristine beaches and the magic of the ever-changing sea. Ocracoke is a place to heal, to relax and to find one’s center. Paradoxically, it is also where I go to get reenergized, where I feel most alive, where I find inspiration.  ~ Lolette Guthrie

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Reflections

July postcard RGB

Artists Lolette Guthrie, Alice Levinson and Evelyn Ward are featured this month at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. They will be showing their newest work in an exhibit titled

“Reflections.”

Painter Lolette Guthrie states that for “Reflections she explored through her paintings both the physical idea of reflections of sky in water and her own reflections on what it felt like to be in a particular place at a particular time. Her long interest in composition, color relationships and the edges of paintings has led to increasingly simplified/spare landscapes and to abstractions derived from these landscapes. She will be exhibiting both oil paintings and pastels.

Guthrie writes, “I paint largely from memory, so my paintings are always reflections on what I have experienced. Because the light quality at a particular time of day, the temperature and the season are so much a part of my memories, my paintings are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I strive to capture the ephemeral nature of light to creates a mood that is timeless. I begin a piece with a general idea of time and place and let the painting tell me where and how far to go. At some point the painting always takes on a life of its own so I am never sure what the end result will be.

Many of Guthrie’s pieces are reflections on time spent on the tiny island of Ocracoke, NC. Located at the southernmost tip of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, it is bounded on one side by Pamlico Sound with its beautiful and vitally important marshes, and on the other by the Atlantic Ocean, thirteen miles of pristine beaches and the magic of the ever-changing sea. Says Guthrie, “It is a place to heal, to relax and to find one’s center. Paradoxically, it is also where I go to get reenergized, where I feel most alive, where I find inspiration.”

Textile artist Alice Levinson will be exhibiting her non-traditional sewn clothworks. Levinson writes, “My work generally begins with fragments of thoughts or memories, jotted in a verbal ‘sketchbook.’ This text suggests visual motifs and choice of technique as I move toward the work.”

I have looked at ‘Reflections’ as a metaphor. Just as our image, reflected in a mirror is refracted through the medium of light, so past experiences are seen as refracted through the prism of time. Memories, recollections are transformed through time as new experiences and novel circumstances influence our sense of the familiar.” Levinson explains that she began her work for this exhibit by “looking back to earlier techniques, to materials previously used. Moving ahead, I experimented with new ways of using these familiar processes and tools. At times actually starting with remnants of an earlier effort and turning it on its head to yield a new direction. The clothworks in this exhibit are the result of this exercise. Each piece has its inception in the familiar elements, yet each represents an exploration beyond the known and practiced toward the new.”

“Visual motifs primarily derive from nature” continues Levinson, “which provides a major source of inspiration for my work. Color and movement are primary features. In each piece, hand dyed fabric has been layered and densely sewn. Occasionally I add bits of vintage cloth remnants to add visual and textural interest – as you might add spices to enhance a stew. Sewing, both machine and hand stitching, is my principal construction medium. I work to meld the disparate pieces of cloth into an integral whole, unifying them with lines drawn of stitching and multicolored thread.”

Potter Evelyn Ward will be showing her salt-fired pottery. She writes that her work for this show is an outgrowth of reflections on her frequent walks outdoors and time spent working in her garden. Ward states “I will largely be exhibiting functional pieces such as vases, pitchers and bowls that incorporate my hand-drawn decals. These decals are made from drawings inspired by the time spent in my garden and on frequent walks. I love to draw the plants and flowers I encounter; I don’t try to reproduce nature but rather try to find the essence of my subjects. This process forces me to slow down and reflect as I search out the essential elements.”

Ward’s functional pottery is made to be used. She hopes her work will add enjoyment to people’s lives, whether it’s a bowl used to serve food at a family celebration or the quiet respite a cup of coffee in a handmade mug can bring.

Please join us for an opening Reception

Friday July 31

6-9

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Not Alone

2nd try
Garry Childs
My work is formed on a potters wheel from terra-cotta clay. I glaze my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather hard”. This is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not yet completely dry. Several coats of one or more glazes are then applied onto the piece, usually by spraying. I sometimes add more colors by brushing and spraying pigments over the glaze.  I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns that you see on my pots.  After completely drying, the pieces are fired in a gas kiln to 2,125 degrees.
Although the shapes and form of my work is always of primary concern to me, the pieces I’ve done for this show have a heightened emphasis on color. I am constantly tweaking my glaze formulas in order to make subtle changes in hue and texture.  This time I have also used two completely new colors in the show. One is a sky blue overspray that I apply over another glaze. It has a nice, almost lacy texture when applied at just the right thickness.
The red glaze on my red and black pieces is also a new color. I have periodically experimented with reds over the past several years and am very happy with my newest results. This particular formula seems to be working very well. It utilizes one of the new commercially available red stains that can be used at much higher temperatures than this type of red could normally be fired. Combining this color with the black is particularly effective with a bit of carving in the black areas that lets the earthy red of the clay show through.
Pottery is made with hands and should be “looked at” with hands. I want everyone who sees  my work in this show or anywhere else to feel free to touch, pick up and handle the pots. Texture is very important and the curves the of shapes are very tactile. Try it, you’ll see.
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