Beneath the Surface

Acrylic artist Marcy Lansman writes of her new work, “I have turned to my imagination for inspiration, rather than to the real world. I began by doodling in my favorite color combination: blue-green and orange. The doodles evolved into a series of paintings in which layers of cool blues and greens alternate with layers of warm oranges, yellows, pinks, and reds.  In these paintings the warm colors often appear to be shining through a cool film. The title Beyond the Surface refers to the fact that earlier layers interact with surface layers to produce the end result. In this series, I have also experimented with combinations of controlled brush strokes and less controlled drips and spatters. The paintings often evoke scenes from outer space.”

Ironwood sculptor Larry writes, “The title Beyond the Surface is especially appropriate for my work. We often think of what is beneath a surface – the elements that are hidden from view.  But equally important is the contrast between a surface and what is above and beyond it.  A feathered heron stands one-legged, next to a smooth-as-glass pool of blue water, mesmerized by his reflection in the water’s surface.  A soaring bird flies with its wings extended, using the surface of the earth below as his only compass for a long journey.  A lone wolf sits on the hard, cold surface of a rock, howling at a moon that is light-years away.”

“Each piece of wood is my canvas, whether it is only four inches long or as large as fourteen. Within these small spaces, I am able to inlay an image that includes both a surface and an object that is above and beyond that surface, like the heron standing in the pool.  Other times I inlay a single image or object – a horse, for example – and the surface is only suggested by the position of the horse’s galloping legs. Either way, I strive to understand and accurately depict how that object is positioned in relation to a specific surface, whether seen or unseen.”

“Ironwood trees grow out of the hot sands of the desert, a surface that is constantly changing, continually shaped and reshaped by desert windstorms. The contrast between the shifting sands of the desert, and the solid, almost rock-like ironwood that emerges from the desert’s surface never ceases to amaze me. I see this contrast in the striking grain of the wood, grain that varies from almost blond to deep brown. Ironwood is the surface upon which I have built my life’s work.”

Founding member Pat Merriman writes nostalgically of her new work, “In my 80th year, one of transition, I am trying a variety of themes, from baby animals to flowers. Some of the elements are inspired by Georgia O’Keefe, while others are inspired by everyday objects– even the designs on a Kleenex box. In addition to these new subjects, I will also have several paintings of koi and barns, as well as collages focusing on the lives of women.

 

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