COMBINATIONS

A Perfect Day for Koi

Pat Merriman

Mixed-media artist and founding member, Pat Merriman, describes her inspiration for Combinations: “For this show I have created several collages in response to Our State Magazine. I learned several startling facts about my birth state. One collage forcuses on Biltmore School of Forestry. Another portrays a series of old wooden windminlls that lined our coast many years ago. It’s always exciting for me to discover obscure facts about North Carolina and to then turn to my canvases to create collages with both printed material and paint.”

Prime

 

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COMBINATIONS

Desert Tracks

 

Eric Saunders

For my own images this can mean combining complementary or opposing elements in a picture, or combining different digital techniques to manipulate a picture.

I have made photographic images utilizing both of these methods,and are part of the featured artist show “Combinations”.

Ancient Roots

I am exhibiting 13 images in this show, plus a few more in the rest of the gallery.

For example there will be images depicting trees and roots along a trail off the Blue Ridge Parkway against a foggy background, and floating leaves blurred into streaks with a time exposure on top of a rocky creek reflecting autumn color.

Floating Leaf Streaks

 

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COMBINATIONS

Garry Childs writes of his new work, “I have been making a series of pieces in the past few years in which I apply local clays to the surface of my pots to develop complex textures. My new work for this show will combine this technique with the bright colors and carving seen on my planters, vases and bowls.”

Mixed-media artist and founding member, Pat Merriman, describes her inspiration for Combinations: “For this show I have created several collages in response to Our State Magazine. I learned several startling facts about my birth state. One collage forcuses on Biltmore School of Forestry. Another portrays a series of old wooden windminlls that lined our coast many years ago. It’s always exciting for me to discover obscure facts about North Carolina and to then turn to my canvases to create collages with both printed material and paint.”

Photographer Eric Saunders writes, “For my work Combinations means three different things. It can mean combining complementary or opposing elements in a picture, or combining more than one picture into a collage, or finally combining different digital techniques to manipulate a picture. I have made 10-15 photographic images utilizing all three of these methods, and all three of these types will be part of the featured artist show.”

 

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TREES BY THREE

Happy Accidents

Ellie Reinhold

At the Trees By Three opening last Friday many visitors asked me about my process. Observing some of the painterly details in Rose Hill, one commented, no one would be able to reproduce that.
It’s true, I said in reply, not even me!

Rose Hill (detail)

 

Rose Hill (detail)

Much in my painting relies on happy accidents. While I’ve developed a set of tools and methods, a certain touch and approach over practice, I rarely have a detailed plan when I begin a piece. I may, however, have a guiding notion—such as a technique I want to use, or a color combination I’ve seen in the woods and want to celebrate. Or perhaps I might be spurred on by a loose compositional concept suggested by one or more scenes or details in nature that I’d like to explore. Sometime a more metaphorical impulse initiates the piece.

Despite this, at a basic level most of my paintings are found through the process of painting. The guiding notion combined with the marks and hues that initiate the piece define a puzzle I have to solve. The act of painting is a search.

To find resolution I follow an intuitive path. I work the whole composition at once with a process that’s both subtractive and additive. I create, shift, alter and recreate the composition, sometimes many times, sometimes radically. I use brushes and painting knives to apply paint, as well as tools to either apply or scratch away lines. Since I use opaque paint, acrylic heavy body straight up, it’s easy to erase by painting over, but what I like best is to paint over incompletely. The more I work, the more inevitable this incomplete coverage is since I am working on a surface that has become irregular; textured in a way that is informed by previous compositional details and informs future ones. The gifts of this process are many, multi-layered hues and ghost images among them.

 

Emerging Warmth

I build my pieces both quickly and slowly. I’m most fond of working with a loose and quick paint application, one that is heavy on physicality but can manage fine detail through the give and take of many happy accidents over time. This approach eschews an overly precious process—so it’s more fun for me as a painter—yet can achieve a dense surface and interesting details. With broad, then more delicate, pulling, pushing and tweaking the painting is eventually revealed… if I’m lucky. This is not guaranteed!

The completed piece is the resolution to the puzzle—regardless of whether the painting has achieved the guiding notion with which I began. For, as I told one viewer who asked how I decided to paint a particular piece, many paintings don’t go where I expect. At some level every painting is a surprise to me. Each one holds the key to it’s own final state. Paintings can demand to be something else altogether, giving me no choice but to follow the happy accidents.

 

Autumn Pocket

 

 

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Trees by Three

 

Ellie Reinhold writes of her new work, “They say ‘write what you know.’ Does the same apply to painters? I’ve been a narrative painter focused on the story for a long time. But one day about a decade ago, walking to my studio, the trees followed me in. I had to paint them. They set up camp in my studio, have grown to fill it, and haven’t left yet!

I am, for sure, a child of the eastern woodlands. It’s the only landscape I know. I have favorites. I confess. There is the 300 year old oak that our rope swing hung from growing up; the magnolia outside of the art building at school where I found recuperative space; the cherry tree I was finally able to plant when I got my own little plot of land; and the pair of trees I slid between on a walk in the woods that spoke to my body with a shiver… I’m sure!

Recently my work reflects my love of color and pattern in combination with my love for the beauty and contrasting austerity of winter tree forms. I suppose I’ve always painted what I know. Lately, it’s been trees.”

Larry Favorite is another artist featured in this show;  Favorite’s work is a natural fit with the theme of trees.  His sculpted boxes, vases, bowls, and lamps all are made from ironwood trees that grow in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona.

Favorite explains, “Each winter I make my annual trek to the Sonoran Desert to gather more ironwood, not knowing where (or even if) I will find the quantity and quality that I need for my work for the coming year.  The wood that I was able to gather this year is truly extraordinary – with some of the most beautiful natural grain that I have ever seen.  Every piece that I am placing in this show is made from wood gathered on this recent trip.”

Favorite continues, “As an artist  I derive my greatest satisfaction from being one with the wood and releasing the beauty that is within.  I love the challenge of looking and listening to each piece of wood, and letting it reveal to me what it might become.  In addition, I make a conscious effort to transmit healing energy from my heart through my hands into each piece of art that I create, almost as a prayer or a blessing.  For me the highest compliment I can receive is when a person holding a piece of my work comments on how calm the work makes them feel.”

Susan Hope describes her new work for Trees by Three,  “My glass work for this show began looking out my studio windows and contemplating the old oak trees beyond. I often waver between literal illustration and impressionist renderings in my work. This time I dug deeper for the inspiration and focused on illusion and light. I wanted to express the energy of life and the joy of being part of it.

Hope writes, “My mosaic panels are either built of boards of done as glass applique (glass on glass) adding yet another dimension of light and imagery. Some of pieces are done as fused paintings and incorporated into the mosaics which are attached to the base. Either way I hope that the viewer of my work is able to take a virtual walk in the woods and feel peace and strength while contemplating the Tree.”

Opening Reception

April 27

6-9

 

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It’s all about the Story

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned and operated gallery in downtown Hillsborough, NC, presents the sixth annual featured show, It’s All About the Story. Each year gallery members choose a local author and book or story collection to respond to in their own medium. Previous authors have included Michael Malone, Jill McCorkle, Lee Smith, Allan Gurganus, and John Bemis. This year the artists have selected a work by Hillsborough’s own, Nancy Peacock, as their source of inspiration. Each piece in the group show, It’s All About the Story, is inspired by Peacock’s memoir,  “A Broom of One’s Own.”

Nancy Peacock will read from her book on Sunday March 11th, 4-6pm at the gallery. The reading will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Nancy Peacock is the author of three novels, the first was chosen as by the New York Times as a Notable Book of the Year. In A Broom of One’s Own, the author describes her experiences as a housekeeper and her journey to becoming a writer. This series of stories is about the houses she cleaned,  the people who lived in them, and her thoughts about writing and life. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict these stories in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate rich storytelling and local art.

Opening Reception

Friday, February 23

6-9

Reading by Nancy Peacock

Sunday, March 11

4-6

 

 

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ART for a C note

The 22 members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts come together to present work that is different in medium, but equal in price. The pieces range from paintings to glass, fabric to pottery, and metal to wood. The common thread: everything is $100.
Opening Reception
Jan 26
6-9

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