ColorFull

Chris Graebner


St John’s Cathedral

After finishing college I spent 14 years running research labs, first in neuroscience and then in cardiology. It was a career that I loved, but when my son was born I returned to my first love, art. Art allowed me to work at home with more family-friendly hours. However, I think that much of my approach to painting has been influenced by my years in the lab. I love detail, and I love to find new ways to approach an old problem. When I see things I want to paint I’m constantly thinking about how I might do it. What technical problems are presented by that scene or that plant, and how should I handle those problems? What is the best medium – oil, cold wax, acrylic, ink, metalpoint, etc., then what is the best surface for it: canvas, linen, panel, paper, clayboard, scratchboard… Each image is a puzzle to be solved and assembled.

Colorful Portugal

Some artists paint from their memories or from their imaginations. I paint because I see something that moves me, something ephemeral, and I want to capture it and make it last. The places I paint are real places, the plants are real plants. Each is an individual experience. The process of painting internalizes that individual experience and makes it forever mine. And I’m at my happiest when the finished painting does the same thing for the viewer.

 

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ColorFull

Chris Graebner‘s paintings are often based on images gathered while traveling. The paintings in ColorFull are drawn from trips, foreign and domestic, taken over the last ten years. Says Graebner, “In the past few months I’ve spent hours going through my photo files choosing images that speak me – images that carry me back to a specific place and time. Once I’ve selected the images, I must choose the size, surface and medium best suited for each.” Graebner generally works on 4-6 paintings simultaneously so that the layers of each painting have time to dry while working on others. “Due to the back to back transitions of my son’s wedding, my husband’s retirement and our move to Elon last fall, I was out of the studio from August through January. Now, as we settle into our new home, I am again beginning to feel the grounding that being in the studio provides in my life. I hope that tranquility is manifest to the viewer in these new paintings.”

The majority of Pringle Teetor‘s pieces for this show are cane work, a centuries old Venetian technique of putting stripes of color and patterns into blown glass. “I’ve always had a broad color palette and here I am able to explore endless combinations of color patterns in clean lines.” The cane used in these pieces have either a colored core with clear on the outside, or veil cane, which has color on the outside with a clear core. Teetor made her veil cane with a variety of transparent or translucent colors, noting that as you look through the piece, the density of the color changes, causing interesting variations of color. Some pieces mix both types of cane, while others used strictly one or the other. In addition, several use varying size lines of contrasting colors to resemble plaids.

Lolette Guthrie is primarily a landscape painter. “Since I mostly paint from memory, my paintings are depictions of my recollections of the colors and the quality of light I experienced at a particular place and at a particular moment in time. For ColorFull, I thought about marveling at sunsets at the coast, remembering a pink and soft orange sky over Lake Jordan, the explosion of color when the sun shines through a stormy sky, the beauty of a broom straw field on a cloudy day.”

 

 

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COMMON GROUND

Swaying in the Summer Sun, a Leafless Tree

 

Michele Yellin

In life, one of the things that interests me most is finding a space where I can have a meeting of the minds and hearts with others. Sometimes I think that it is not unusual to feel isolated and alienated. With a little effort, we can connect with others and share what we have in common – our dreams, our hopes, our values and lives.

The same is true for my artwork. I create work as an expression of my own inner and outer life. Once I put it out in the world, I am interested in other people connecting with, and finding that what I paint, is part of their lives as well.

My paintings evolve organically. I start by laying down texture and color to create a loose abstract field. The textures and colors suggest shapes and spaces, much like clouds creating shapes in the sky. Everything and anything is on that canvas, waiting to be found. I draw what I see, and begin painting. Some things stay, others are painted over, developing paintings that have many layers. Through this process, the painting begins to tell a story. It is how I discover and reveal my inner life.

 

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COMMON GROUND

 

 

The paintings of Linda Carmel celebrate women and what they do every day to stabilize and support family and community. Her work points us toward a world in which women can take the lead in finding common ground, moving us away from this time of polarization, peril and uncertainty.

Carmel writes, “We can see things happening that might point the way for our country.  Record numbers of women are running for office in this year’s elections. The most effective challenge to the NRA is being led by adolescents who are furious at the adult world’s valuing assault rifles over their lives.”

Linda Carmel’s paintings in this show reflect her thoughts on the current predicament American society is facing. “My work illuminates how women can help heal a torn community. This series points toward a time of compassion for all of humanity and a respect for the Earth.  With a positive attitude and with humor, I offer my perspective to the viewer.”

Carmel adds, “My paintings have sculpted surfaces. You can actually feel the peaks and valleys that add nuance to the imagery.  I encourage people to touch these canvasses so that they can connect with the themes on a deeper level.”

Jewerly artist, Nell Chandler writes, “When we first decided to call our show Common Ground, I associated the title with us: four women.  As artists we definitely share a common sensibility. We are kindred spirits.

I then turned to the work that I would create for our show and I felt inspired by my friends to dig deeper into new techniques that I’d learned last year such as teaching myself torch enamels I learned from You tube tutorials, books, magazines and well just talking with other artist jewelers at the shows. I realized that I wanted to push myself to try to master some of these techniques to make jewelry that reflected the common ground between my established and my new love of torch enamels.

Painter, Michele Yellin writes, “In life, what interests me most is finding a space where I can have a meeting of the minds and hearts with others. Sometimes I think that it is not unusual to feel isolated and alienated. With a little effort, it is easy to connect with others and share what we have in common – our dreams, our hopes, our lives and our values.

The same is true for my artwork. I create work as an expression of my own inner and outer life. Once I put it out in the world, I am interested in other people connecting with, and finding that what I paint, is part of their lives as well.

My paintings evolve organically. I start by laying down texture and color to create a loose abstract field. The textures and colors suggest shapes and spaces, much like clouds creating shapes in the sky. Everything and anything is on that canvas, waiting to be found. I draw what I see, and begin painting. Some things stay, others are painted over, developing paintings that have many layers. Through this process, the painting begins to tell a story. It is how I discover and reveal my inner life.”

For Common Ground Evelyn Ward is showing a selection of her twice-fired stoneware pottery; the decoration integrates representations of local native plants. Ward writes,”I enjoy making good, useful pots that someone will enjoy using every day.” Her process for creating them is far from simple. Each piece passes through a labor intensive salt firing, and then a second electric kiln firing, which fastens ceramic decals of delicate plant drawings or photographs into place, and results in sepia-toned studies of seed pods or leaves contrasted against a rich, salt-glazed background.

Opening Reception

6-9

July 27

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MINDFULNESS

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts continues its Featured Artist series with new works by two painters, Jude Lobe and Eduardo Lapetina, and one sculptor, Jason Smith.

Eduardo Lapetina writes, “The creation of my abstract paintings requires a state of active attention, being open to my thoughts and feelings. I tend to work in total isolation to discover the mysteries of my subconscious mind that are part of my own personal history. My abstractions hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, intangibles and will. They are the result of a collaboration of my mind and spirit.

Titles of some of the paintings that I have produced for the Mindfulness are: ‘Back to Wonder,’  ‘The Trail is Now Visible,’ and “In the Forest of the Heart’. The title of each painting hints at both the physical appearance and the poetic ambiguity of the long journey that brings it into being.”

Jason Smith creates abstract sculptures with steel. Smith writes about his process: “I enjoy the manipulation of form in space to create visual balance. For Mindfulness I have combined pieces of steel and other metals to create compositions that convey rhythm, action and movement.”

Jude Lobe describes her inspiration for the art she produced for this exhibit: “We have all heard of mindfulness, but do we really understand it? I believe mindfulness is living in the moment and appreciating what is around us without judgment. I try not to interpret what is there – just to experience it.”


Lobe continues, “I walked outside and breathed the sweet air and listened to birds. Then returned to the studio and picked up a panel on which to paint. Choosing colors randomly from my palette, I applied them to the panel, layer after layer with no preconceived idea. Now and then I’d scratch the surface to reveal what was below.  A landscape emerged, almost as if the painting had a mind of its own. When I gazed at this new series of painted panels, I realized they all moved me in different ways. Sitting and viewing a blue painting made me feel relaxed, red made me feel excitement. After a while my left brain began to engage and I started to see what I wanted to add to the image to take it to its final stage.

I have always found creating art roots me in the present, in a peaceful space. Whether I am working in cold wax, metal, or clay, my expectation is that creating art with a calm mindset will translate those same feelings to the viewer.

Opening Reception

June 29

6-9

 

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COMBINATIONS

A Perfect Day for Koi

Pat Merriman

Mixed-media artist and founding member, Pat Merriman, describes her inspiration for Combinations: “For this show I have created several collages in response to Our State Magazine. I learned several startling facts about my birth state. One collage forcuses on Biltmore School of Forestry. Another portrays a series of old wooden windminlls that lined our coast many years ago. It’s always exciting for me to discover obscure facts about North Carolina and to then turn to my canvases to create collages with both printed material and paint.”

Prime

 

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Trees by Three

 

Ellie Reinhold writes of her new work, “They say ‘write what you know.’ Does the same apply to painters? I’ve been a narrative painter focused on the story for a long time. But one day about a decade ago, walking to my studio, the trees followed me in. I had to paint them. They set up camp in my studio, have grown to fill it, and haven’t left yet!

I am, for sure, a child of the eastern woodlands. It’s the only landscape I know. I have favorites. I confess. There is the 300 year old oak that our rope swing hung from growing up; the magnolia outside of the art building at school where I found recuperative space; the cherry tree I was finally able to plant when I got my own little plot of land; and the pair of trees I slid between on a walk in the woods that spoke to my body with a shiver… I’m sure!

Recently my work reflects my love of color and pattern in combination with my love for the beauty and contrasting austerity of winter tree forms. I suppose I’ve always painted what I know. Lately, it’s been trees.”

Larry Favorite is another artist featured in this show;  Favorite’s work is a natural fit with the theme of trees.  His sculpted boxes, vases, bowls, and lamps all are made from ironwood trees that grow in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona.

Favorite explains, “Each winter I make my annual trek to the Sonoran Desert to gather more ironwood, not knowing where (or even if) I will find the quantity and quality that I need for my work for the coming year.  The wood that I was able to gather this year is truly extraordinary – with some of the most beautiful natural grain that I have ever seen.  Every piece that I am placing in this show is made from wood gathered on this recent trip.”

Favorite continues, “As an artist  I derive my greatest satisfaction from being one with the wood and releasing the beauty that is within.  I love the challenge of looking and listening to each piece of wood, and letting it reveal to me what it might become.  In addition, I make a conscious effort to transmit healing energy from my heart through my hands into each piece of art that I create, almost as a prayer or a blessing.  For me the highest compliment I can receive is when a person holding a piece of my work comments on how calm the work makes them feel.”

Susan Hope describes her new work for Trees by Three,  “My glass work for this show began looking out my studio windows and contemplating the old oak trees beyond. I often waver between literal illustration and impressionist renderings in my work. This time I dug deeper for the inspiration and focused on illusion and light. I wanted to express the energy of life and the joy of being part of it.

Hope writes, “My mosaic panels are either built of boards of done as glass applique (glass on glass) adding yet another dimension of light and imagery. Some of pieces are done as fused paintings and incorporated into the mosaics which are attached to the base. Either way I hope that the viewer of my work is able to take a virtual walk in the woods and feel peace and strength while contemplating the Tree.”

Opening Reception

April 27

6-9

 

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