COMBINATIONS

A Perfect Day for Koi

Pat Merriman

Mixed-media artist and founding member, Pat Merriman, describes her inspiration for Combinations: “For this show I have created several collages in response to Our State Magazine. I learned several startling facts about my birth state. One collage forcuses on Biltmore School of Forestry. Another portrays a series of old wooden windminlls that lined our coast many years ago. It’s always exciting for me to discover obscure facts about North Carolina and to then turn to my canvases to create collages with both printed material and paint.”

Prime

 

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Trees by Three

 

Ellie Reinhold writes of her new work, “They say ‘write what you know.’ Does the same apply to painters? I’ve been a narrative painter focused on the story for a long time. But one day about a decade ago, walking to my studio, the trees followed me in. I had to paint them. They set up camp in my studio, have grown to fill it, and haven’t left yet!

I am, for sure, a child of the eastern woodlands. It’s the only landscape I know. I have favorites. I confess. There is the 300 year old oak that our rope swing hung from growing up; the magnolia outside of the art building at school where I found recuperative space; the cherry tree I was finally able to plant when I got my own little plot of land; and the pair of trees I slid between on a walk in the woods that spoke to my body with a shiver… I’m sure!

Recently my work reflects my love of color and pattern in combination with my love for the beauty and contrasting austerity of winter tree forms. I suppose I’ve always painted what I know. Lately, it’s been trees.”

Larry Favorite is another artist featured in this show;  Favorite’s work is a natural fit with the theme of trees.  His sculpted boxes, vases, bowls, and lamps all are made from ironwood trees that grow in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona.

Favorite explains, “Each winter I make my annual trek to the Sonoran Desert to gather more ironwood, not knowing where (or even if) I will find the quantity and quality that I need for my work for the coming year.  The wood that I was able to gather this year is truly extraordinary – with some of the most beautiful natural grain that I have ever seen.  Every piece that I am placing in this show is made from wood gathered on this recent trip.”

Favorite continues, “As an artist  I derive my greatest satisfaction from being one with the wood and releasing the beauty that is within.  I love the challenge of looking and listening to each piece of wood, and letting it reveal to me what it might become.  In addition, I make a conscious effort to transmit healing energy from my heart through my hands into each piece of art that I create, almost as a prayer or a blessing.  For me the highest compliment I can receive is when a person holding a piece of my work comments on how calm the work makes them feel.”

Susan Hope describes her new work for Trees by Three,  “My glass work for this show began looking out my studio windows and contemplating the old oak trees beyond. I often waver between literal illustration and impressionist renderings in my work. This time I dug deeper for the inspiration and focused on illusion and light. I wanted to express the energy of life and the joy of being part of it.

Hope writes, “My mosaic panels are either built of boards of done as glass applique (glass on glass) adding yet another dimension of light and imagery. Some of pieces are done as fused paintings and incorporated into the mosaics which are attached to the base. Either way I hope that the viewer of my work is able to take a virtual walk in the woods and feel peace and strength while contemplating the Tree.”

Opening Reception

April 27

6-9

 

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It’s all about the Story

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned and operated gallery in downtown Hillsborough, NC, presents the sixth annual featured show, It’s All About the Story. Each year gallery members choose a local author and book or story collection to respond to in their own medium. Previous authors have included Michael Malone, Jill McCorkle, Lee Smith, Allan Gurganus, and John Bemis. This year the artists have selected a work by Hillsborough’s own, Nancy Peacock, as their source of inspiration. Each piece in the group show, It’s All About the Story, is inspired by Peacock’s memoir,  “A Broom of One’s Own.”

Nancy Peacock will read from her book on Sunday March 11th, 4-6pm at the gallery. The reading will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Nancy Peacock is the author of three novels, the first was chosen as by the New York Times as a Notable Book of the Year. In A Broom of One’s Own, the author describes her experiences as a housekeeper and her journey to becoming a writer. This series of stories is about the houses she cleaned,  the people who lived in them, and her thoughts about writing and life. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict these stories in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate rich storytelling and local art.

Opening Reception

Friday, February 23

6-9

Reading by Nancy Peacock

Sunday, March 11

4-6

 

 

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ART for a C note

The 22 members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts come together to present work that is different in medium, but equal in price. The pieces range from paintings to glass, fabric to pottery, and metal to wood. The common thread: everything is $100.
Opening Reception
Jan 26
6-9

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The Art of Giving

 Each holiday season the members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts transform the gallery to showcase original ornaments and hand-made gifts. The gallery’s 22 members work in a variety of media, providing a wide array of art and fine craft for holiday shoppers. The glass art includes hand-blown vessels, ornaments, solar lights, paperweights, and jewelry. Fiber art on display includes framed collage quilts and hand dyed stitched cloth. The jewelry in the show covers a variety of styles and techniques, from copper and bronze to sterling and fine silver necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings, some with gold accents and stones. Visitors will also find metal sculpture, handmade art dolls, pottery, turned wood, and carved ironwood with turquoise and silver inlay. Fine art photography, oil and acrylic painting, scratchboard, and mixed media work festively surround the three dimensional pieces on pedestals.

Come explore the wonderful art exhibited at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts; you will find exactly the right gift for that special person.

Opening Reception

Friday Nov 24

6-9

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Orange County Studio Tour

This marks the 23nd year that the Orange County Artists Guild will host its Annual Open Studio Tour. During the first two weekends in November, more than eighty artists located throughout Orange County, including Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and surrounding areas will be participating in this juried event and opening their studios to visitors who will discover where the creative design happens!

For the seventh year, Pringle Teetor and Linda Carmel will be showing together at Carmel’s home studio, 101 Huntington Drive, Chapel Hill, #45 on the tour. Pringle’s blown glass and Linda’s textured paintings complement each other perfectly. There will be plenty to see and touch.

Ali Givens joins the studio tour for her first year. Ali creates fabric collages that are landscapes, cityscapes and still lifes sewn from colorful batiks and other natural fibers. Her studio is #12 on the tour located at 3611 Mijos Lane, Chapel Hill.

Lolette Guthrie paints primarily with oil. She builds up her canvases layer by layer. Each piece begins with a loose idea that explores the beauty of the natural world. Her studio, #67, is located in Chapel Hill at 113 Rhododendron Drive.

Marcy Lansman returns to the tour for her 12th year. Her new studio, #35, is located at 750 Weaver Dairy Road, Apt. 198, Chapel Hill. Marcy paints with acrylics and her work has evolved from realistic to more abstract, expressive of personal insights and emotions.

Eduardo Lapetina’s studio is located at 318 North Estes Drive, Chapel Hill, #55 on the tour map. This is his ninth year participating on the tour. Lapetina will show new abstract paintings with vibrant colors and in various sizes including very large pieces. His paintings are worked in complete solitude. They represent the discoveries of the unconscious mind. In the artist’s words, “They hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, and the magic of a private, secret language.”

Ellie Reinhold is joining the tour for the fifth year. She is #60 on the tour and will welcome you at her studio off Roosevelt Drive in Chapel Hill, in the neighborhood across from Cafe Driade. Reinhold’s explores vibrant landscapes using color, brushwork, and iconic imagery.

Michael Salemi is a woodturner who is showing jointly with Miriam Sagasti at her studio (#22). Michael’s work includes both traditional woodturning forms: bowls, plates and platters, and unusual pieces such as ikebanas.

Alice Levinson will be exhibiting her contemporary wall-hung textile pieces. Each is rich in color and texture, and composed of hand-dyed fabric, densely sewn. Her studio is #15 on the map, 3604 Pasture Road, Hillsborough.

Jason Smith creates one of a kind metal sculptures in steel and copper using reclaimed material. His sculpture is abstract. The manipulation of form in space allows the viewer to feel rhythm and movement in his compositions. Jason’s new studio is #2 on the map, 1709 NC HWY 86N, Hillsborough.

OCAG’s Open Studio Tour is a rare opportunity for art lovers from Orange County and beyond to meet artists in their places of work, to view and purchase art directly from the artist, and in many instances to watch as artists demonstrate how they create their pieces. Studio Tour brochures and maps of participants’ studios are available at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and other area locations or on the Guild website: http://www.OrangeCountyArtistsGuild.com

Many artists on this year’s tour will have work in the OCAG Preview Exhibit at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Their work will be on display from October 23 through November 12, 2017. This preview show is a wonderful opportunity for a first look at the work on the tour and can help you plan your tour route.

Opening Reception

Friday October 27

6-9

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Beyond the Surface

Larry Favorite

I have been an artist for more than 40 years, yet I still find it difficult to describe my art. Put simply, I create boxes, bowls, small sculptures and wall hangings out of desert ironwood. I inlay sterling silver and turquoise into the surface of each piece. My inlays are most often images drawn from nature.

Like most artists, I have had to overcome a variety of challenges in order to create my art. The wood that I use in my work is found only in the Sonoran Desert in Arizona. Each year, I drive cross-country and spend long, hot days in the desert, searching out downed ironwood trees. (I never cut a living tree.) I rough-cut the trees in the desert, load the massive chunks onto my truck, and haul literally over a ton of ironwood to my studio in Mebane on each trip. The physical and logistical challenges of these annual treks to gather ironwood can be daunting.

Desert ironwood is exceptionally dense and heavy, in many ways more like stone than wood. It is nearly impossible to cut into ironwood using traditional woodworking tools and methods. But I was a mechanical engineer before becoming an artist, and I’ve always enjoyed solving technical problems. Still, it has taken me years to adapt tools and to refine the techniques that I use today to transform rough-cut desert ironwood into highly polished, elegant pieces of finished art.

On my journey as an artist, I have overcome many challenges, but I have also received many gifts. Physically, I am healthier than I ever was when I was an engineer. At 79 years of age, my hands are still rock steady. When I was in the business world, I was not a patient person; ironwood has taught me patience. I no longer receive a regular paycheck, but I have learned to trust that the Divine Intelligence of the Universe will reward me for my efforts (hopefully in time for me to pay my bills). I don’t have to punch a time clock, yet I still show up in my studio (almost) every day, and I work longer hours than I ever did before. I do this not because I have to, but because being in my studio and creating art continues to bring me joy.

 

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