MINDFULNESS

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts continues its Featured Artist series with new works by two painters, Jude Lobe and Eduardo Lapetina, and one sculptor, Jason Smith.

Eduardo Lapetina writes, “The creation of my abstract paintings requires a state of active attention, being open to my thoughts and feelings. I tend to work in total isolation to discover the mysteries of my subconscious mind that are part of my own personal history. My abstractions hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, intangibles and will. They are the result of a collaboration of my mind and spirit.

Titles of some of the paintings that I have produced for the Mindfulness are: ‘Back to Wonder,’  ‘The Trail is Now Visible,’ and “In the Forest of the Heart’. The title of each painting hints at both the physical appearance and the poetic ambiguity of the long journey that brings it into being.”

Jason Smith creates abstract sculptures with steel. Smith writes about his process: “I enjoy the manipulation of form in space to create visual balance. For Mindfulness I have combined pieces of steel and other metals to create compositions that convey rhythm, action and movement.”

Jude Lobe describes her inspiration for the art she produced for this exhibit: “We have all heard of mindfulness, but do we really understand it? I believe mindfulness is living in the moment and appreciating what is around us without judgment. I try not to interpret what is there – just to experience it.”


Lobe continues, “I walked outside and breathed the sweet air and listened to birds. Then returned to the studio and picked up a panel on which to paint. Choosing colors randomly from my palette, I applied them to the panel, layer after layer with no preconceived idea. Now and then I’d scratch the surface to reveal what was below.  A landscape emerged, almost as if the painting had a mind of its own. When I gazed at this new series of painted panels, I realized they all moved me in different ways. Sitting and viewing a blue painting made me feel relaxed, red made me feel excitement. After a while my left brain began to engage and I started to see what I wanted to add to the image to take it to its final stage.

I have always found creating art roots me in the present, in a peaceful space. Whether I am working in cold wax, metal, or clay, my expectation is that creating art with a calm mindset will translate those same feelings to the viewer.

Opening Reception

June 29

6-9

 

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TREES BY THREE

Happy Accidents

Ellie Reinhold

At the Trees By Three opening last Friday many visitors asked me about my process. Observing some of the painterly details in Rose Hill, one commented, no one would be able to reproduce that.
It’s true, I said in reply, not even me!

Rose Hill (detail)

 

Rose Hill (detail)

Much in my painting relies on happy accidents. While I’ve developed a set of tools and methods, a certain touch and approach over practice, I rarely have a detailed plan when I begin a piece. I may, however, have a guiding notion—such as a technique I want to use, or a color combination I’ve seen in the woods and want to celebrate. Or perhaps I might be spurred on by a loose compositional concept suggested by one or more scenes or details in nature that I’d like to explore. Sometime a more metaphorical impulse initiates the piece.

Despite this, at a basic level most of my paintings are found through the process of painting. The guiding notion combined with the marks and hues that initiate the piece define a puzzle I have to solve. The act of painting is a search.

To find resolution I follow an intuitive path. I work the whole composition at once with a process that’s both subtractive and additive. I create, shift, alter and recreate the composition, sometimes many times, sometimes radically. I use brushes and painting knives to apply paint, as well as tools to either apply or scratch away lines. Since I use opaque paint, acrylic heavy body straight up, it’s easy to erase by painting over, but what I like best is to paint over incompletely. The more I work, the more inevitable this incomplete coverage is since I am working on a surface that has become irregular; textured in a way that is informed by previous compositional details and informs future ones. The gifts of this process are many, multi-layered hues and ghost images among them.

 

Emerging Warmth

I build my pieces both quickly and slowly. I’m most fond of working with a loose and quick paint application, one that is heavy on physicality but can manage fine detail through the give and take of many happy accidents over time. This approach eschews an overly precious process—so it’s more fun for me as a painter—yet can achieve a dense surface and interesting details. With broad, then more delicate, pulling, pushing and tweaking the painting is eventually revealed… if I’m lucky. This is not guaranteed!

The completed piece is the resolution to the puzzle—regardless of whether the painting has achieved the guiding notion with which I began. For, as I told one viewer who asked how I decided to paint a particular piece, many paintings don’t go where I expect. At some level every painting is a surprise to me. Each one holds the key to it’s own final state. Paintings can demand to be something else altogether, giving me no choice but to follow the happy accidents.

 

Autumn Pocket

 

 

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PAPER ROCK SCISSORS

Lynn Wartzki
I decided this year to fully embrace my role as the “paper” in our featured artist show “Rock, Paper, Scissors.” All of the art doll sculptures I created for this show have their mix-media roots planted in a figure executed in some combination of papier-mâché and paperclay.  These materials are highly versatile and allow me to really play with such a playfully themed show.
I love the fact that we at HGA get the chance to experience the satisfaction of creating twice.  There is the solitary experience when, as an artist, you decide that a piece is complete.  It is extremely exciting when what you see on the worktable embodies exactly what you had sketched in a notebook, or held in your mind’s eye while working.  The second, even more enjoyable experience, occurs during our gallery opening when we get the chance to see the work through the eyes of the viewer.  It is so very interesting to hear what draws another to my sculpture, hear the questions they evoke, or, my personal favorite, when you see that spark of agreement when they hear or read my description of each piece.
I also played with the paper theme beyond just materials used, it is also included in the inspiration for many of my sculptures.  I find a number of my art dolls residing in the space somewhere between figurative sculpture and book sculpture.  Three pieces in this show are drawn from works of fiction.  For two of these, “Boleyn’s Ghost” and “Tinkerbell Never Lost Her Shadow”, I utilize selected text from paperback copies of books as part of their surface design.  An additional sculpture, “Local Star” utilizes a different definition of the word paper, as in the news.  “Local Star” is a dancer positioned in the same pose as one of Degas’ well known works, but wigged and clad in a costume created from in the pages of the local newspaper.
 
The last piece I created before installation of the show is titled “Hope”.  My inspiration for this art doll was color and a smile.  I started not with my figure, but with brightly colored tissue paper used to make papier-mâché balloons.  “Hope” is a seated doll that starts with black feet and gradually lightens as you move up the figure ending in an explosion of rainbow “hair”.  Completely conceived to bring a smile, I was rewarded at the opening when the viewer who eventually purchased her exclaimed, “That’s my kid!”

Rock Paper Scissors

Rock: Arianna Bara writes of her new work, “As a jeweler, stones are often the focus of what I am creating. Boulder opals, drusy quartz, labradorite, fossils and gemstones inspire me with their flashes of color and movement. I am intrigued by the stories our ancestors told about the origins of rocks and their properties. My new work incorporates many different stones into textured sterling silver settings in ways that help relay these ancient stories.”

Paper: Lynn Wartski describes her process for this show, “My creative adventure with art doll sculptures continues to lead me in new and interesting directions. Paper has become the most prominent material in my new work: from paper clay to sculpt faces and hands, to adding a tissue paper crinoline as an accent under a skirt, to drawing inspiration drawn from the pages of printed word. I find myself flipping pages of books, and scouring the internet for images to stretch the ideas I am trying to convey within a piece. I enjoy incorporating small details into each art doll that the viewer can only discover upon close inspection. These items pulled from texts often add surprises to the surfaces of the sculptures. One example of this blending of book and doll is my latest look at Lewis Carroll’s Alice Adventures in Wonderland. My sculpture portrays Alice’s inspection of the small bottle labeled “drink me” and the curiously small door she finds in the wall. Vintage playing card images adorn this figure’s dress, floor of the room, and the back of the sculpture. I am excited for my ‘paper’ works to play alongside Arianna Bara’s beautiful ‘rock’ and silver jewelry designs, and the colorful ‘scissors’ play found in Ali Givens delightful textile works.”

Scissors:s Ali Given writes, “The fabric collages in this show depict details of things I see as I explore new places. A building, a person, a vase of flowers– these are all subjects that I like to illustrate with fabric. Often while I wander in new cities, certain things, like a hummingbird painted on an old building, are so wonderful to me that I come home and begin cutting and stitching fabric to capture my initial excitement.”

 

Opening Reception

March 30

6-9

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The Art of Giving

 Each holiday season the members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts transform the gallery to showcase original ornaments and hand-made gifts. The gallery’s 22 members work in a variety of media, providing a wide array of art and fine craft for holiday shoppers. The glass art includes hand-blown vessels, ornaments, solar lights, paperweights, and jewelry. Fiber art on display includes framed collage quilts and hand dyed stitched cloth. The jewelry in the show covers a variety of styles and techniques, from copper and bronze to sterling and fine silver necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings, some with gold accents and stones. Visitors will also find metal sculpture, handmade art dolls, pottery, turned wood, and carved ironwood with turquoise and silver inlay. Fine art photography, oil and acrylic painting, scratchboard, and mixed media work festively surround the three dimensional pieces on pedestals.

Come explore the wonderful art exhibited at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts; you will find exactly the right gift for that special person.

Opening Reception

Friday Nov 24

6-9

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Orange County Studio Tour

This marks the 23nd year that the Orange County Artists Guild will host its Annual Open Studio Tour. During the first two weekends in November, more than eighty artists located throughout Orange County, including Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and surrounding areas will be participating in this juried event and opening their studios to visitors who will discover where the creative design happens!

For the seventh year, Pringle Teetor and Linda Carmel will be showing together at Carmel’s home studio, 101 Huntington Drive, Chapel Hill, #45 on the tour. Pringle’s blown glass and Linda’s textured paintings complement each other perfectly. There will be plenty to see and touch.

Ali Givens joins the studio tour for her first year. Ali creates fabric collages that are landscapes, cityscapes and still lifes sewn from colorful batiks and other natural fibers. Her studio is #12 on the tour located at 3611 Mijos Lane, Chapel Hill.

Lolette Guthrie paints primarily with oil. She builds up her canvases layer by layer. Each piece begins with a loose idea that explores the beauty of the natural world. Her studio, #67, is located in Chapel Hill at 113 Rhododendron Drive.

Marcy Lansman returns to the tour for her 12th year. Her new studio, #35, is located at 750 Weaver Dairy Road, Apt. 198, Chapel Hill. Marcy paints with acrylics and her work has evolved from realistic to more abstract, expressive of personal insights and emotions.

Eduardo Lapetina’s studio is located at 318 North Estes Drive, Chapel Hill, #55 on the tour map. This is his ninth year participating on the tour. Lapetina will show new abstract paintings with vibrant colors and in various sizes including very large pieces. His paintings are worked in complete solitude. They represent the discoveries of the unconscious mind. In the artist’s words, “They hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, and the magic of a private, secret language.”

Ellie Reinhold is joining the tour for the fifth year. She is #60 on the tour and will welcome you at her studio off Roosevelt Drive in Chapel Hill, in the neighborhood across from Cafe Driade. Reinhold’s explores vibrant landscapes using color, brushwork, and iconic imagery.

Michael Salemi is a woodturner who is showing jointly with Miriam Sagasti at her studio (#22). Michael’s work includes both traditional woodturning forms: bowls, plates and platters, and unusual pieces such as ikebanas.

Alice Levinson will be exhibiting her contemporary wall-hung textile pieces. Each is rich in color and texture, and composed of hand-dyed fabric, densely sewn. Her studio is #15 on the map, 3604 Pasture Road, Hillsborough.

Jason Smith creates one of a kind metal sculptures in steel and copper using reclaimed material. His sculpture is abstract. The manipulation of form in space allows the viewer to feel rhythm and movement in his compositions. Jason’s new studio is #2 on the map, 1709 NC HWY 86N, Hillsborough.

OCAG’s Open Studio Tour is a rare opportunity for art lovers from Orange County and beyond to meet artists in their places of work, to view and purchase art directly from the artist, and in many instances to watch as artists demonstrate how they create their pieces. Studio Tour brochures and maps of participants’ studios are available at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and other area locations or on the Guild website: http://www.OrangeCountyArtistsGuild.com

Many artists on this year’s tour will have work in the OCAG Preview Exhibit at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Their work will be on display from October 23 through November 12, 2017. This preview show is a wonderful opportunity for a first look at the work on the tour and can help you plan your tour route.

Opening Reception

Friday October 27

6-9

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Three Perspectives

Eric Saunders, Fine Art Photographer

Artist Statement

My subject matter is outdoor landscapes, natural and urban, in color or black and white. I sometimes explore other subjects (artifacts and architecture), and digital enhancement or manipulation of images.

There is no particular story line to my work. I am trying to communicate the beauty of abstract art, and the beauty or intrigue of transient moments in nature and life.

I am mostly self-taught as a photographer. This makes my progress slower than I would like at times, because I listen to all advice, regardless of its merit.

Previously I studied classical piano, and then worked as a corporate computer programmer. I find inspiration for my images in music of all styles and eras; my work experience in computers has enabled me to learn digital darkroom techniques more easily.

All work had been using 35mm film using a NIKON 6006 and NIKON lenses (with a tripod most of the time). In April, 2010 I purchased my first digital SLR, a NIKON D700 (which uses the same lenses as my old film SLR).

I print my images using an Epson 3880 printer, using paper and inks archival to at least 100 years.

 

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