it’s all about the story

story-postcard-rgb

 

“Out Of Abaton” is John Bemis‘ new interpretation of the well-loved tale of Pinocchio. Just as the wooden puppet changes into a human boy, Bemis transforms this classic story with fantastic creatures, alchemy, and the mystery of human emotion–all woven into the magical and glorious landscape of Italy. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict this fantasic tale in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate rich story telling and local art.

About John Claude Bemis:

John Claude Bemis is an award-winning author and also an inspiring speaker and musician. Bemis grew up in North Carolina and became an elementary school teacher after studying Art History and Education at UNC-Chapel Hill. His experiences of reading, exploring, and teaching naturally evolved into a career of writing. He received the Exellence in Teaching Award from UNC Chapel Hill’s School of Education and was chosen as North Carolina’s Piedmont Laureate for Children’s Literature in 2013. He lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Reception

Feb 24

6-9

To follow our Blog please hit the FOLLOW button at top of page.

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

The Art of Giving

holiday-rgbEach holiday season the members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts transform the gallery to showcase original ornaments and hand-made gifts. The gallery’s 21 members work in a variety of media, providing a wide array of art and fine craft for holiday shoppers.

The glass art includes hand-blown vessels, ornaments, solar lights, paperweights, and jewelry. Fiber art on display includes framed collage quilts and hand dyed stitched cloth, knitted scarves; and fabric handbags. The jewelry in the show covers a variety of styles and techniques, from copper and bronze to sterling and fine silver necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings, some with gold accents and stones.  Visitors will also find metal sculpture, pottery, turned wood, enamels, and carved ironwood with turquoise and silver inlay. Fine art photography, oil and acrylic painting, encaustics, scratchboard, and mixed media work festively surround the three dimensional pieces on pedestals.

Explore the wonderful art exhibited at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts to find a special gift for that special person.

To follow our Blog please hit the FOLLOW button at top of page.

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Dreaming in Color

Sky is Bluer Thank the SeaAlice Levinson

TEXTILE can be a confusing label for a piece of artwork. It truly is an umbrella term which encompasses a wide range of work from quilts to weavings, from fashion to tapestries. Each of these categories of textile is identified by the manner in which the cloth and/or fiber is assembled (e.g., sewn, woven, or quilted). When I started work with textiles,I was drawn to the texture, handof cloth. I worked with cloth I sourced from stores, scrap, or vintage collections. My interest was to use it to assemble visually interesting compositions.

Most often these compositions also had a thread of narrative at their core.

The more I worked, the more I encountered a variety of fabrics, the more I came to appreciate the role pattern and color played as I assembled my compositions.

Alice'e Stash

My stash of acquired fabric grew. My facility with needle and thread increased. All was good. Then one day I watched a demonstration of cloth dying and a new door opened for me, I was entering the world of surface design, yet another sub-category that falls within the rubric of textile. The hallmark of surface design is the manipulation of the surface of cloth through the application of techniques and substances to create a unique textile.

My facination with the process led, to the first of several workshops to learn

to dye cloth. I learned to prepare carefully the dye concentrates and then begin the magic of turning white cloth to any and every hue. Initially I was limited by my lack of experience and expertise in managing the dying process. As someone once said, practice makes perfect.Well, in my case, practice has made good enough!It was a heady experience to create my own rainbow stash of fabric. From early efforts with muslin and cotton sheeting, I progressed to working with embossed and textured cotton,linen, wool, velvet and silk. Each particular fabric takes the dye in its own way and each has its own particular texture. More learning,hs led to more variety with which to work. In the time to follow I have learned to use the dyes to paint and screenprint my fabrics adding pattern to the elements of color and texture. The cloth that emerges from my wet (dye) studio has become the primary inspiration for my current work which are featured in the exhibit, DREAMING IN COLOR. The use of surface design techniques leads my work to be process driven. This encourages experimentation and sponteneity in my working and results in a liveliness and sense of organic movement in the resulting works. I hope you will visit the exhibit and consider the many steps that have resulted in the works you see.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

To follow our Blog please hit the FOLLOW button at top of page.

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

ART from shows

Dreaming in Color

 

 

August postcard RGBAlice Levinson, a textile artist, writes of her experience preparing for the show: “In October, 2015 I participated in the X Florence Biennale in Florence, Italy, an international exhibition of contemporary art. My body of clothworks was awarded the Lorenzo di Medici Bronze Medal in Textile Arts. These works will be among those I will be showing in the DREAMING in COLOR exhibit in Hillsborough. Starting with white cloth, I experiment freely with dye, pigments, and printing techniques to create cloth which is complex in texture and rich in visual interest. The fabric is cut or torn and pieces are mixed and melded as I assemble my work. Each composition is built of successive layering of fabric and thread. I aim to create works that engage the viewer and delight the eye with movement and vibrant color. Raw edges are honored and loose threads purposefully retained. My intuitive work process encourages spontaneity and experimentation. By nature, I am an observer of people and the natural world. Musings, scribbled phrases, and gestural sketches follow. These suggest themes, visual motifs, a palette. My intention in place, I reach for the cloth and then the magic begins. Image, line, and pattern find their way though my hands into the work in a remarkable way. My task is to stay open and responsive to the ‘voice’ of the cloth. ‘Listening ‘ with my hands as well as my eyes, I work to facilitate the creative flow. This isn’t easy, but is always satisfying, and often, surprising.”

Glass artist  Pringle Teetor describes her new work for the show, “Colors, bright and bold run through my work in many variations. The combinations of different metals in some of the glass colors produce spectacular reactions. Many years ago I studied painting and the artist Morris Lewis had a huge impact on my work. Now, I’ve taken this vision into my glasswork applying colors to create bold, irregular stripes on my vessels.  Another use of color in my work is in my incalmo bowl pieces. Incalmo is fusing together multiple glass pieces to make a single vessel. These have to be done very carefully and require a great amount of precision. I’ve combined 4-6 different colors in these vessels to make wide stripes in the bowls – some colors are analogous, others are contrasting to make a bold statement.”

Lolette Guthrie writes, “I am a landscape painter.  I work largely from memory so my paintings are reflections on what I experienced at a particular time in a particular place. They are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I continually strive to capture the ephemeral nature of the light remembered. I begin each piece with a general idea of time and place and then let the painting tell me where and how far to go. As a result, I am never sure what the end result will be because at some point each piece takes on a life of its own and I just follow along. For Dreaming In Color, I concentrated on exploring the use of color, especially in the sky, that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather.  In most pieces, the foreground is the accent note.”

Opening Reception

Friday August 26

6-9

 

To follow our Blog please hit the FOLLOW button at top of page.

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

ART from shows

Colorful Language

Ali Givens

In my new fabric collages for Colorful Language I have continued to experiment working from a small to large format. First I design a small collage that serves as a sketch for my larger pieces. I find that it’s much easier and more fun to figure out the composition on a small scale. My friend/painter Lolette Guthrie reminded me recently that designs that work well small usually translate well into larger pieces. My favorite challenge for this show was enlarging a very small collage, “The Yellow Chair,” into “Modigliani and My Yellow Chair,” which is almost 7 feet by 4 feet. It took many layers of fabric and touches of paint to get all of the angles right in the small version, which was about the size of a piece of notebook paper. The challenge then for the big piece, “Modigliani and My Yellow Chair” was sewing something so large which physically can be difficult to handle and can sometimes require an extra pair of hands (usually my sister’s or my daughter’s).

 (little one)Ali's small one
I feel happy that the fabric collages both large and small capture the feeling of a simple, intimate space–my apartment.
(big one)
Ali's big one
To follow our Blog please hit the FOLLOW button at top of page.

To receive Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Newsletter please complete the form below with your name and email address.

Please visit our website

ART from shows