IT’S ALL ABOUT THE STORY

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned and operated gallery in downtown Hillsborough, NC, presents the seventh annual featured show, It’s All About the Story. Each year gallery members choose a local author and book or story collection to respond to in their own medium. Previous authors include Michael Malone, Jill McCorkle, Lee Smith, Allan Gurganus, John Bemis, and Nancy Peacock. This year the artists have selected a work by a person who plays a very significant role in the history of Hillsborough, Elizabeth Keckley. Her memoir, Behind the Scenes, or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House, describes her remarkable journey from slavery in Hillsborough to freedom as an accomplished dressmaker and confidante of Mary Todd Lincoln. Each piece in the group show, It’s All About the Story, is inspired by Keckley’s inspiring book. The show runs from February 1stFebruary 20th.

Reception

February 10

3-4:30

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Resolutions

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts welcomes in the New Year with its fifth annual statewide juried show, RESOLUTIONS 2019.  RESOLUTIONS 2019 will run from January 7th to January 31st, 2019  and will showcase the work of artists from across North Carolina. Following  the success of the juried shows of the previous four years, HGA held its open call to artists for RESOLUTIONS 2019 this fall.  Artists from throughout the state entered works in a wide variety of media .  This year’s exhibit features work in metal, wood, ceramic, textile, and photography.  Also represented are works in oil, acrylic, watercolor, pastel, and encaustic. As in previous years, the exhibit has drawn participation from artists living as far east as Wilmington and as far west as Asheville.  RESOLUTIONS is one of a very few art exhibits dedicated specifically to North Carolina artists.  The artist-owners of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts have enjoyed the new challenges of organizing and curating the RESOLUTIONS exhibits.  Each year’s exhibit presents the group with unique situations, testing the artist-group’s creativity in new ways.

Guest juror for awards for RESOLUTIONS 2019 will be John Coffey, Deputy Director for Art and Research and the Becher Curator of American and Modern Art of the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh.  A native of Raleigh, Coffey holds undergraduate degrees in History and Art History from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and a Masters degree in Art History from Williams College. In his years at the NCMA, Coffey has been instrumental in making the museum a nationally renowned institution.   An Artists Reception and Juror’s Talk will be held on Friday, January 25th, from 6-9 pm.  All works in the show are for sale.

About the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts:

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts is owned and operated by 22 local artists and represents these established artists exhibiting contemporary fine art and fine craft. The Gallery’s offerings include oil and acrylic paintings, pastels, sculpture, ceramics, photography, textiles, jewelry, glass, metals, encaustic, enamel, and wood. 121 N. Churton Street, Hillsborough, NC 27278. Phone: (919) 732-5001. The gallery is open 10am-6pm MondaySaturday, and noon-4pm on Sunday. More information can be found on the HGA website: http://www.HillsboroughGallery.com

Opening Reception

Fri Jan 25

6-9

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TRILOGY

Marcy Lansman

What does “mixed media” mean? The answer varies from piece to piece and artist to artist. Here’s what it means in the case of my painting, “Dreaming of Magnolias,” shown below. This piece is part of TRILOGY, the current featured artist show at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts.

Dreaming of Magnolias

Strange as it may seem, I started the piece by tearing brown paper grocery bags into random shapes and pasting them down on a white panel using acrylic “matte medium,” a fluid the consistency of thick cream that is often used as glue. The result was a brown mosaic with white “cracks,” somewhat reminiscent of a stone walk. (You can see what remains of the “cracks” in the upper right quadrant of the painting.) I have used this technique in many of my abstract paintings because I like the random linear elements it adds to the finished piece.

I covered this mosaic with fluid acrylic paint in a random pattern of neutral gray-beige tones ranging from dark to light with touches of orange, rust, red and even a little blue. I liked the resulting painting but felt that it needed something.

At the time I was taking a class in collage. The class gave me the idea of pasting photographs on top of the random gray-beige background. I used to have a huge magnolia tree in my front yard, and I have taken hundreds of photos of magnolias over the years. I blew some of them up, cut them out, and threw them down on the painting. To my surprise, I liked the effect. But I didn’t like the way the magnolias stood out against the background. I wanted them to blend in. So I used Photoshop to adjust the color of the shadows in the magnolias so that they matched the gray-beige tones in the painting. This involved a long process of trial and error. I ended up with piles of magnolia rejects, flowers photos that were too yellow or too blue or too pink. The tone needed to be just right to create the effect I wanted: the illusion that the flowers were floating on the stony background of the painting. Then out came the matte medium again, this time to paste the photos down, as seamlessly as possible. I was delighted with the result. A couple of coats of acrylic varnish and the painting was done.

When I first started making art, I painted realistic flowers in watercolor. Many viewers, especially people who are familiar with my earlier work, were convinced that I painted the flowers in “Dreaming of Magnolias” and the other mixed media pieces in the show. I can’t help feeling a little guilty as I tell them that the flowers are actually photographs collaged onto a painted background. But not so guilty that I don’t plan to continue experimenting with this technique. Maybe I’ll move on to mushrooms next.

 

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Trilogy

Alice Levinson

In TRILOGY, as in each Featured Artist show, three artists come together, based upon the coincidence of calendars. We choose a title, and then each go our own way, working independently with our particular medium, responding to the theme literally, metaphorically, or ignoring it completely. Typically with no prior collaboration, we arrive at the Gallery on the date of installation and the magic begins. Month after month, a conversation becomes a melody in harmony as three visual ‘voices’ blend and an integrated exhibit is woven from disparate works that vary in material, size, and subject matter.

In TRILOGY, the voices of three artists tell a story of creativity across three mediums.

In creating my sewn textiles, I use three key components: cloth, thread, and needle.

My textiles always find their start in the cloth.

Alice’s palette

Starting with white cloth experiment freely with dye, pigments, and printing techniques to created cloth which is complex in texture and rich in visual interest.

Over the past several years, I have set aside lengths of cloth I found to be too interesting to cut up and use in assemblage work. This Spring I found I was drawn to these cloths. Monochromatic, they are notable for their subtle shadings and tones.

Working with whole lengths of dyed cloth, I’ve layered stitching with multi-hued threads to articulate visual motifs, and highlight the nuanced shading and tonality in the cloth. Cotton and silk threads of varying weights add texture, and depth to the work. Hand and machine embroidery, further enhance texture and add tactile and visual interest. The hand work is particularly satisfying. It proceeds slowly, a meditation of the rhythymic, repeated movement. Each line of stitching, each short length of thread has defines and pointed the way to what follows. The first series of three works feature a common motif of stitched lines of dancing tree-like figures, a frequent visual element in my work.

 

The second series, again of three, are also composed entirely of stitching. Working with whole lengths of dyed cloth, I’ve layered stitching with multi-hued threads to articulate visual motifs, and highlight the nuanced shading and tonality in the cloth. Cotton and silk threads of varying weights add texture, and depth to the work. Hand and machine embroidery, further enhance texture and add tactile and visual interest. The hand work is particularly satisfying. It proceeds slowly, a meditation of the rhythmic, repeated movement. Each line of stitching, each short length of thread has defines and pointed the way to what follows. Floral motifs dance across the panels of tapestry, inspired by my study of Italian and Indian tapestry

.

The third series is an effort to compose using color as a primary compositional element.

They are bright and multi-colored. Spontaneity ruled their composition and underlies their playful, whimsical aspect. This proved a good balance to the meditative, labor intensity of the other works. I was having so much fun making them that I ended up with a whole slew of these pieces. All in all the work for TRILOGY has allowed an evolution to new ways of working which always invigorates and energizes my creative ‘engine.’ The accompanying photos give a hint to the work in progress and a look at my ‘palette’, in my case, a table full of colorful dyed cloth, the true inspiration for all of my work.

 

Not quite there

 

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COMMON GROUND

Nell Chandler

Earrings for Mary Ann

Last year when I had my featured artist show I learned how to work with torch enamels. Throughout the year I had other obligations and have not had a chance to work with them since. I decided this year that I still had a lot to learn about torch enamels so I decided to feature them again for our show.

I took a couple of kiln fired enamel classes years ago but never really connected with it. But then one day I found myself mesmerized by torch enamel tutorials I would find on You Tube when I would have a few slow moments working at the gallery. I couldn’t stop watching them and then I  got a couple of books on the subject.  It seemed like I had most of the things I needed to get started and I knew I had left over enamels from those classes.

So last year I discovered that I absolutely loved the process of laying layer after layer of enamels and watching each color emerge after being red hot and then cooled down. That’s what I was missing when I tried kiln enameling! I loved being with the piece the whole process instead of putting it in a kiln and waiting to see what happened.

So this year I learned a few new techniques and bought myself some new colors and got to work. This was one of my most favorite times getting ready for our show.

And on a personal note it was a wonderful opening reception for all four of us. And my best friend from the 5th grade came to our opening from Alabama and we have kept in touch but we haven’t seen each other in years and years so that was a special treat. And my sister from Tennessee came and we relaxed on tubes in the Eno River Saturday. All in all it was a wonderful time.

 

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Resolutions 2016

_20160105_145744resolutions csard

The Hillsborough Gallery Of Arts Celebrates NC Artists With A Statewide Juried Show

RESOLUTIONS 2016, the title of The Hillsborough Gallery of Art’s second statewide juried show, is an exhibition of the work of artists from across North Carolina.

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned fine art and fine craft gallery located in historic Hillsborough, North Carolina, will celebrate the start of the New Year by hosting a juried fine art and fine craft exhibit from January 4 to January 24, 2016. Titled Resolutions 2016, the exhibition includes the work of two-dimensional and three-dimensional fine artists from throughout North Carolina.  All works are for sale.

Guest juror for the awards will be Dr. Peter Nisbet, Chief Curator and Interim Director of the Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC. Nisbet has extensive national and international experience in collection development and exhibitions. Formerly Curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum at the Harvard Art Museum, he was responsible for a collection of 39,000 works of art and played a leading role in the reconceptualization and revitalization of the museum. Nisbet holds a BA and MA from Cambridge University and a PhD in the History of Art from Yale Universiity

Opening Reception

January 8th

6-9

 

 

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ART from shows

In the Mind’s Eye

skyblue

 

Eric Saunders

Why do I make photographs? What do I see when I make photographs? What do I think I see when I make photographs? What do viewers of my photographs see? What do they think they see? What do I want them to see?

These are questions which imply that the “mind’s eye” means many different things depending on the context.

Each image I make is an attempt to create an abstract visual adventure for the viewer – an adventure like reading a story or listening to a piece of music.

red porch

In order to do this effectively I look past the literal (i.e. a cloud, a sky, a house, a barn, a rock, a ripple in a stream, a placard, a beach, a section of rusty metal fence) and see abstract orderly patterns of light, color, line, texture, and form. Depending on the angle of view and the cropping and editing of the image, these patterns will move the viewer into the image and hold the viewer’s attention for a period of time, and perhaps stimulate the viewer’s imagination in a meaningful way.

This is the eye in my mind.

 

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