Earthworks

 

Chris Graebner

My paintings fall into two general categories, botanicals and landscapes. My landscapes are drawn from my travels and are based on photos often taken out of a car window using a cell phone. Because I’m handicapped I don’t do a lot of walking, but you’d be surprised what a lot of wonderful things can be seen from the driver’s seat of an automobile! In fact, sometimes I just drive around Orange County back roads taking pictures of old barns and fields.

The paintings in this show were all done from photos taken between January 2016 and February 2017 in places as disparate as Florida, Iowa and Michigan. Three of the paintings, “At Anchor,” “Dock at the Pines” and “Deer on the Runway” are of an island in Lake Huron we’ve been going to each summer for the last few years. The Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa paintings were done from photos taken on the way back from a family wedding in South Dakota.

One of the fun things about cellphone photos is that they include GPS data allowing you to find the exact place they were taken. And, if you need more visual information from a different angle than you’ve captured in your photo you can often find it on Google street view. That doesn’t mean that my paintings are exact representations of what is in the photo, or even of what is actually in the location. I do a fair amount of editing – adding or deleting, moving things around, changing colors etc. – but you would certainly be able to match up the paintings with the photos that inspired them.

 

Earthworks

Connections

JUDE LOBE

This year for the show Earthworks I’m continuing to use the method of building and deconstructing in the medium of cold wax & oil. However, I’m concentrating on the ‘connectedness ‘ between earth, man, fauna, plants and everything else making up the universe, and the loss that may occur if we don’t become more mindful.

The idea of us not just being a part of nature, but connected in some way through a primal web of energy intrigues me and feels calming. It makes such sense to me. How else can one explain how we feel the same awe when watching a sunset, or feel anguish when we see someone in pain, or get teary-eyed at a wedding.

2nd try Jude's image

My paintings in cold wax & oil, encaustics and collage are a journey to articulate on a surface an emotion I have difficulty in articulating in words. Sometimes I’m on an archaeological excursion. From building up layers of colors and textures, to scraping away, scratching and uncovering what is beneath, leads me to new places I discover.

In this show I am also exploring working with rust on silk and combining it with copper which I fold and torch fire to bring out the colors.

 
I have been involved with art in one way or another throughout my life. Presently, I work in my studio built by my husband. The studio has easels, enameling kiln, pottery kiln, pottery wheel, slab roller, encaustic equipment, an assortment of paints and mediums, and many other items that inspire me to create.

CopperBowl&inside

Earthworks

Garry Childs

All of my work is formed on the potters wheel from terra-cotta clay. I apply glazes and pigments to my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather-hard” which is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not completely dry. I usually do this by spraying but sometimes also with a brush. I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns seen on my work.

Some of the pieces in the show utilize a combination of glazes and a metallic slip coating areas on the pot. I particularly like the way the slip gets a slightly bronze tone on some pieces.

I also have several pots that are a continuation of my “Red Clay” series that use local clays dug straight from the ground to develop texture. These pieces are much heavier textured than I have done in the past and incorporate some additional colors.

It is Springtime so naturally there will be planters included in the show. I make planters in three general sizes. The smallest are approximately twelve inches wide and tall measured on the outside, the medium 15″ x 15″ and the large are 18″ x 18″.  The 12″ size fit nicely on most steps and are the perfect size for growing herbs on your deck or patio. Larger sizes are available on a custom basis.  All have two drainage holes in the bottom of the pot and are suitable for use both indoors and outside in moderate climates.

Let the River Answer

Eduardo Lapetina
My paintings are a way for me to enter the world, not an escape from it. A painting opens a door into a space in which a play may be staged, where plot points, conflict, climax, and resolution all come together. In the process of creation, a painting becomes a battlefield for my struggles about what is, what is not, what ought to be, what I like, what I love, what I hate, frustrations, disenchantment, embarrassments. My art exposes to the world my most private thoughts and feelings, forming a spatial connection between what lives within me and what is alive in everyone else.
I want my spaces to be painted without intention, without conscious technique, without anything that might interfere with the connections I seek to create. I do not want to keep a tradition. I am not looking for beauty but the viewer might find it in my art. And it is not about any particular theme or motif, it is about effectively conveying the immaterial through materiality. My aim is to project energy, visual vibrations, light, voices,excitement, and enthusiasm, captured in a physical form that you can take home with you.

Let the River Answer

 Michael Salemi

This past year has been a year of losses.  Not the least of these was the death of the poet Leonard Cohen.  Among my generation, Cohen is best known for the song “Suzanne,” the woman who lives by the river and, when faced with a difficult situation, “let’s the river answer.”  That song and the poetry it holds was, for me, the motivation for our show.

Rivers are tricky.  On most days they are peaceful.  But on some they are raw power and will have their own way.

It’s like that in woodturning.  On most days, the lathe is a peaceful place to work.  The wood is gentle and the turner translates it into peaceful and pleasant shapes that beg to be held. But sometimes, the wood is not peaceful.  It is gnarly, with voids and grain patterns unsuitable for pleasant shapes. Confronted by wood like that it is best if the turner let’s the wood be what it will.

Our show has been a joy.  It is always fun, and a little frightening, to offer a new body of work to gallery regulars. Our community supports us so well and, in turn, we are driven as artists to live up to that support. We know that we too must let the river answer.

Let the River Answer

march-postcard-rgbArianna Bara describes the inspiration for each of her new one-of-kind creations in sterling silver: “My pieces for this show are about questions. The ones we all have about why we are here and what we are here to do. Believing as I do that we are spiritual beings having a human experience and that nature is our partner and guide in that experience, the search for answers leads me to look to what is right beneath my feet, to what is right beside me as I walk in the woods or along the river. I believe the answers surround us and are there for us to discover.”

Wood turner, Michael Salemi writes, “Normally, rivers contain the flow of water within their banks. But when water is too powerful to be contained, the river answers by changing. My work for this show displays the same tension. Some pieces are controlled shapings of wood to classic and expected forms, but others reflect the power of the wood itself—the work becomes what the wood would have it be.”

Of his new work for the show, Eduardo Lapetina states, “My paintings are a way for me to enter the world, not an escape from it. A painting opens a door into a space in which a play may be staged– where conflict, climax, and resolution all come together. In the process of creation, a painting becomes a battlefield for my struggles about what is, what is not, what ought to be, what I like, what I love, what I hate, frustrations, disenchantment, embarrassments. My art exposes to the world my most private thoughts and feelings, forming a spatial connection between what lives within me and what is alive in everyone else. I want my spaces to be painted without intention, without conscious technique, without anything that might interfere with the connections I seek to create. I do not want to keep a tradition. I am not looking for beauty, but the viewer might find it in my art. My paintings are not about any particular theme or motif, they are attempts to convey the immaterial through materiality. My aim is to project energy, visual vibrations, light, voices, excitement, and enthusiasm, and to capture them in a physical form that you can take home with you.”

Opening Reception

Friday March 31st

6-9

 

 

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it’s all about the story

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“Out Of Abaton” is John Bemis‘ new interpretation of the well-loved tale of Pinocchio. Just as the wooden puppet changes into a human boy, Bemis transforms this classic story with fantastic creatures, alchemy, and the mystery of human emotion–all woven into the magical and glorious landscape of Italy. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict this fantasic tale in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate rich story telling and local art.

About John Claude Bemis:

John Claude Bemis is an award-winning author and also an inspiring speaker and musician. Bemis grew up in North Carolina and became an elementary school teacher after studying Art History and Education at UNC-Chapel Hill. His experiences of reading, exploring, and teaching naturally evolved into a career of writing. He received the Exellence in Teaching Award from UNC Chapel Hill’s School of Education and was chosen as North Carolina’s Piedmont Laureate for Children’s Literature in 2013. He lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Reception

Feb 24

6-9

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