TREES BY THREE

Matriarch

Susan Hope
Playful Puzzles
The preparation of the mosaic pieces for this show was a
challenging puzzle in every way. Mosaic art work is as old as time
and historically, have been done with tile or stone and in the more
present ages with glass. Since I have been working in stained
glass for 30+ years, I have hundreds of pounds of ‘scrap’ glass
stored for the next smaller use. Like a fabric artist with a ‘stash’ of
fabric, I too had a huge stash of glass to work with. Chips of the
rainbow, I like to call them.
Trees have always been powerful images for me and have been
used in all forms of my glass work. The piece “Matriarch”, is of the
huge, ancient, oak tree on the hill above my studio. She has stood
the test of time and storms and has never failed to greet me as I
gazed across the field. I find strength, stability and peace among
the trees.
My technique, is really simply my vision…imagination. There is
the mundane part of cutting and priming the backing board but,
sometimes I get lucky and images reveal themselves in rough
pencil sketches on the board or perhaps a few words of a song or
inspiring phrase that is running through my head that day. I
sometimes ‘see’ the images but more often they are revealed as I
begin to work.

Detail of Spring Festivities

The plastic bins of glass crowd my table as I begin to sort and
choose my palette. Once defined I begin cutting, chipping,
snipping and gluing pieces of glass in place. The hardest part is
that first piece of glass. Honestly, the whole process is a puzzle,
one that I create as I go and one that also forces me to find
pieces to fit into spaces created by others. It is critical that I work
slowly enough to assess the patterns and colors because once
the glue is dried the changes can only be made with a great deal
of elbow grease and occasional spewing of words.
After the design is revealed and shadows and tones are
established I continue to work the background. This is when the
pieces get smaller and smaller and smaller. Filling in the final
gaps with grout is exciting and the final cleaning can reveal far
more than I even imagined. The uniformity of the grout between
all those tiny pieces of glass is very satisfying.

Spring Festivities

I was inspired this winter as I worked by the bizarre seasonal
changes we experienced. “Surprise Snowfall” was done on the
day of the largest flakes ever seen and “Spring Festivities”
happened as the redbud trees began to bloom…earlier than they
should have. It seemed that the Seasons had come together to
play. That is what it was like to create all these mosaics too…
paying homage to my tree friends, many long hours of serendipity
and a playful spirit.

Surprise Snowfall

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Rock Paper Scissors

Rock: Arianna Bara writes of her new work, “As a jeweler, stones are often the focus of what I am creating. Boulder opals, drusy quartz, labradorite, fossils and gemstones inspire me with their flashes of color and movement. I am intrigued by the stories our ancestors told about the origins of rocks and their properties. My new work incorporates many different stones into textured sterling silver settings in ways that help relay these ancient stories.”

Paper: Lynn Wartski describes her process for this show, “My creative adventure with art doll sculptures continues to lead me in new and interesting directions. Paper has become the most prominent material in my new work: from paper clay to sculpt faces and hands, to adding a tissue paper crinoline as an accent under a skirt, to drawing inspiration drawn from the pages of printed word. I find myself flipping pages of books, and scouring the internet for images to stretch the ideas I am trying to convey within a piece. I enjoy incorporating small details into each art doll that the viewer can only discover upon close inspection. These items pulled from texts often add surprises to the surfaces of the sculptures. One example of this blending of book and doll is my latest look at Lewis Carroll’s Alice Adventures in Wonderland. My sculpture portrays Alice’s inspection of the small bottle labeled “drink me” and the curiously small door she finds in the wall. Vintage playing card images adorn this figure’s dress, floor of the room, and the back of the sculpture. I am excited for my ‘paper’ works to play alongside Arianna Bara’s beautiful ‘rock’ and silver jewelry designs, and the colorful ‘scissors’ play found in Ali Givens delightful textile works.”

Scissors:s Ali Given writes, “The fabric collages in this show depict details of things I see as I explore new places. A building, a person, a vase of flowers– these are all subjects that I like to illustrate with fabric. Often while I wander in new cities, certain things, like a hummingbird painted on an old building, are so wonderful to me that I come home and begin cutting and stitching fabric to capture my initial excitement.”

 

Opening Reception

March 30

6-9

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ART for a C note

The 22 members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts come together to present work that is different in medium, but equal in price. The pieces range from paintings to glass, fabric to pottery, and metal to wood. The common thread: everything is $100.
Opening Reception
Jan 26
6-9

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RESOLUTIONS 2018

RESOLUTIONS 2018

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts welcomes in the New Year with its fourth annual statewide juried show, RESOLUTIONS 2018

RESOLUTIONS 2018, will run from January 3th to January 21nd, 2018, and will showcase the work of artists from across North Carolina. Following on the success of the juried shows of the previous three years, HGA held its open call to artists for RESOLUTIONS 2018 this fall.  2D and 3D artists from throughout the state entered works in a wide variety of media. This year’s show includes painting, photography, sculpture, ceramics, collage, encaustics, glass and more.

As in previous years, the exhibit has drawn participation from artists across the state from the mountains to the coast, from Murphy, east to Wrightsville Beach. The annual RESOLUTIONS exhibits are one of a very few art exhibits dedicated specifically to North Carolina artists. The artist-owners of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, enjoy the ever-new challenges which come as the group continues its role of organizing and curating the RESOLUTIONS exhibits.

Guest juror for awards for RESOLUTIONS 2018 will be Dr. Sarah Schroth, Director of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Dr. Schroth joined the Nasher in 1994. She served as Senior Curator at the Nasher for a number of years, before becoming its director in 2013. 

While at Duke, Schroth has organized numerous shows ranging from old masters to contemporary art, including the award-winning 2008 exhibition, “El Greco to Velázquez: Art during the Reign of Philip III.” As a result of that exhibition, which she organized with the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Schroth was named knight-commander in the Order of Isabel la Católica by King Juan Carlos I of Spain. She has collaborated on major exhibitions with the Museo del Prado, the Seattle Art Museum and others, and has published widely. Prior to joining the Nasher, Schroth worked at the Kimbell Museum in Fort Worth, Texas; the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; and the Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She majored in art history at Mary Washington College and, after working at the Atlanta College of Art and living in Spain, earned her Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. She went on to receive the David E. Finley Fellowship at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts.

An Opening Reception and Jurors Talk will be held on Friday, January 12th, from 6-9 pm.  The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts is located at 121 North Churton Street in Hillsborough, NC. All works in the show are for sale.

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The Art of Giving

 Each holiday season the members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts transform the gallery to showcase original ornaments and hand-made gifts. The gallery’s 22 members work in a variety of media, providing a wide array of art and fine craft for holiday shoppers. The glass art includes hand-blown vessels, ornaments, solar lights, paperweights, and jewelry. Fiber art on display includes framed collage quilts and hand dyed stitched cloth. The jewelry in the show covers a variety of styles and techniques, from copper and bronze to sterling and fine silver necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings, some with gold accents and stones. Visitors will also find metal sculpture, handmade art dolls, pottery, turned wood, and carved ironwood with turquoise and silver inlay. Fine art photography, oil and acrylic painting, scratchboard, and mixed media work festively surround the three dimensional pieces on pedestals.

Come explore the wonderful art exhibited at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts; you will find exactly the right gift for that special person.

Opening Reception

Friday Nov 24

6-9

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Serious Fun

 

 

Nell Chandler

For our show Serious Fun I found myself in a few different modes. First I wanted to reach back to my earlier mostly narrative line but add a more light a airy feel to it. I worked with copper and my etched brass but added a hinged sterling component to it.

I also got inspired by a collaborative piece I did with Pringle Teeter when she asked me to make a chain for her Hunter’s Globe in our All about the Story Exhibit. The more the world around me seemed to becoming unhinged the more obsessed I became with hinges and I made a couple of necklaces and bracelets that were created mostly of hinges. I loved the light and airy feel they have.

Then I got in a mood to work on some of my serious work of a more tailored line. I felt like I was searching for some sort of stability.

All the while I was reading books, magazines and watching tutorials on how to fire enamel during the slow times on my shifts at the gallery. I have wanted to learn torch enameling for a long time. I began ordering the things I knew I would need and one day I sat down with my book and began experimenting. I loved it from the first firing I did! I found I could mix my light and airy component to the sturdy and stable piece of enamel and find a comfortable balance.

I loved the way my friends and family and gallery folks reacted to my newest line at our opening! I loved that so many people wanted to try it on and hold it in their hands. And having my exhibit along with Ali Givens and Michele Yellin, with all their big bold happy colors made our title Serious Fun fit perfectly into the space..

 

Serious Fun

Nell Chandler writes, “For our show I have created some of my narrative jewelry about relationships, spirituality and just life. I have also made some of my more abstract pieces that have a more tailored look. I always enjoy reaching back to my previous techniques and jewelry lines for inspiration, but this year feels different. I find the challenges of the world today burdening my heart.  As a reaction to this heaviness, I find myself in the studio making pieces that are more lighthearted and airy.”

Chandler continues,  This show  has also given me the opportunity to try something new. I have been thinking about trying a little torch firing and have been reading magazines and books and watching tutorials. I have dabbled a bit now and it feels perfect for our show we named Serious fun.

Painter and assemblage artist, Michele Yellin, often begins her work by placing a quote in the underpainting as way to start the process. Color is the language she uses with great boldness to say the things that cannot be expressed in words. As she layers the canvas with color she finds that figures and shapes begin to emerge. Much like a writer developing a cast of characters, she lets these shapes and figures tell her who they are. Michele moves from philosophical to playful with deftness and a strong sense of her own artistic voice.

Yellin writes, “For Serious Fun I have created vibrant paintings and wooden folk art using texture, layers of color, and line. With these elements, I am exploring the reality that is inside the reality we see.”

Fabric artist Ali Givens writes, “For Serious Fun  I have worked on refining several fabric collages that I began years ago. For some pieces, such as “Orange Peacock” I removed one element, the peacock, from the original quilt and built an entirely new composition. In another work, “Long Afternoon” I simplified the colors to create a completely new feeling. I’ve also revisted my favorite theme for other new work: the still life. Especially fun and challenging for me was incorporating my own interpretations of my fellow artists’ paintings and pottery as elements in my own collages. Being inspired by my friends is always the most fun, serious fun.”

Opening Reception

July 28

6-9

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