Parallel Play

While considering a title for their three person show, Jason, Evelyn and Ellie sifted through many words in an effort to evoke their creative commonalities. Many came from geometry: intersection, structure, converge, planes, parallels, and perspective. Words related to play such as natural, spontaneous, and essential were another common thread. In the end “Parallel Play” seemed a perfect combination of both themes.

Ellie Reinhold states, “Several years ago I inadvertently fell in love with using geometric grids in my paintings. I’d paint a spray of circles or rectangles, to both break up and hold together my landscapes. I fell in love with the balance these paintings struck between landscape and abstraction. In lucky moments, the representation that remained was stronger once it had been pulled away from convention. While my work is informed by elements from the natural world, (tree forms in particular), my process pulls it away from simple landscape into a different arena altogether. This process demands a playful, risk-taking approach. A constant willingness to let go of things I love– to destroy what’s on the canvas– in order to find the path to a better painting.”

Sculptor, Jason Smith, states, “As an artist, sculpture has always been my primary focus. Though I have worked in many mediums, I always return to metal because of its strength, malleability and inherent beauty. My sculpture is abstract. I manipulate form in space to create visual balance, combining rhythm, movement, and action to create compositions that convey the energy found in my work.

Potter Evelyn Ward creates pots that reflect the strength of a salt fire with the delicacy of a sepia photograph. Ward writes, “I like to make good, useful pots that someone will enjoy using every day.” Her process for creating them is far from simple. First, each piece passes through a labor-intensive salt firing. Then the pots are placed in a second electric kiln firing, which fastens ceramic decals of delicate plant drawings, or photographs to the rich, salt-glazed background. Evelyn designs and creates all of the images for the decals, which are derived from her photographs and drawings of botanical subjects.

Opening Reception

6-9

April 28

Let the River Answer

Eduardo Lapetina
My paintings are a way for me to enter the world, not an escape from it. A painting opens a door into a space in which a play may be staged, where plot points, conflict, climax, and resolution all come together. In the process of creation, a painting becomes a battlefield for my struggles about what is, what is not, what ought to be, what I like, what I love, what I hate, frustrations, disenchantment, embarrassments. My art exposes to the world my most private thoughts and feelings, forming a spatial connection between what lives within me and what is alive in everyone else.
I want my spaces to be painted without intention, without conscious technique, without anything that might interfere with the connections I seek to create. I do not want to keep a tradition. I am not looking for beauty but the viewer might find it in my art. And it is not about any particular theme or motif, it is about effectively conveying the immaterial through materiality. My aim is to project energy, visual vibrations, light, voices,excitement, and enthusiasm, captured in a physical form that you can take home with you.

Let the River Answer

march-postcard-rgbArianna Bara describes the inspiration for each of her new one-of-kind creations in sterling silver: “My pieces for this show are about questions. The ones we all have about why we are here and what we are here to do. Believing as I do that we are spiritual beings having a human experience and that nature is our partner and guide in that experience, the search for answers leads me to look to what is right beneath my feet, to what is right beside me as I walk in the woods or along the river. I believe the answers surround us and are there for us to discover.”

Wood turner, Michael Salemi writes, “Normally, rivers contain the flow of water within their banks. But when water is too powerful to be contained, the river answers by changing. My work for this show displays the same tension. Some pieces are controlled shapings of wood to classic and expected forms, but others reflect the power of the wood itself—the work becomes what the wood would have it be.”

Of his new work for the show, Eduardo Lapetina states, “My paintings are a way for me to enter the world, not an escape from it. A painting opens a door into a space in which a play may be staged– where conflict, climax, and resolution all come together. In the process of creation, a painting becomes a battlefield for my struggles about what is, what is not, what ought to be, what I like, what I love, what I hate, frustrations, disenchantment, embarrassments. My art exposes to the world my most private thoughts and feelings, forming a spatial connection between what lives within me and what is alive in everyone else. I want my spaces to be painted without intention, without conscious technique, without anything that might interfere with the connections I seek to create. I do not want to keep a tradition. I am not looking for beauty, but the viewer might find it in my art. My paintings are not about any particular theme or motif, they are attempts to convey the immaterial through materiality. My aim is to project energy, visual vibrations, light, voices, excitement, and enthusiasm, and to capture them in a physical form that you can take home with you.”

Opening Reception

Friday March 31st

6-9

 

 

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Now and Again

 

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The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts is celebrating 10 years as a gallery with a group show including 42 members, past and present. The gallery opened in September of 2006, and the founding 15 members started the gallery as a leap of faith. The artists did not know each other, and they had little experience in running a business. The gallery is now run by 21 members who are equal partners and make decisions by consensus. Featured artist shows, group shows, and juried shows create a strong relationship between the artists and their surrounding community. Now and Again, the latest group show, is the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts’ way of celebrating with all of the talented artists and friends who have made the gallery a success.

Opening Reception

Friday

January 27

6-9

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Dreaming in Color

Sky is Bluer Thank the SeaAlice Levinson

TEXTILE can be a confusing label for a piece of artwork. It truly is an umbrella term which encompasses a wide range of work from quilts to weavings, from fashion to tapestries. Each of these categories of textile is identified by the manner in which the cloth and/or fiber is assembled (e.g., sewn, woven, or quilted). When I started work with textiles,I was drawn to the texture, handof cloth. I worked with cloth I sourced from stores, scrap, or vintage collections. My interest was to use it to assemble visually interesting compositions.

Most often these compositions also had a thread of narrative at their core.

The more I worked, the more I encountered a variety of fabrics, the more I came to appreciate the role pattern and color played as I assembled my compositions.

Alice'e Stash

My stash of acquired fabric grew. My facility with needle and thread increased. All was good. Then one day I watched a demonstration of cloth dying and a new door opened for me, I was entering the world of surface design, yet another sub-category that falls within the rubric of textile. The hallmark of surface design is the manipulation of the surface of cloth through the application of techniques and substances to create a unique textile.

My facination with the process led, to the first of several workshops to learn

to dye cloth. I learned to prepare carefully the dye concentrates and then begin the magic of turning white cloth to any and every hue. Initially I was limited by my lack of experience and expertise in managing the dying process. As someone once said, practice makes perfect.Well, in my case, practice has made good enough!It was a heady experience to create my own rainbow stash of fabric. From early efforts with muslin and cotton sheeting, I progressed to working with embossed and textured cotton,linen, wool, velvet and silk. Each particular fabric takes the dye in its own way and each has its own particular texture. More learning,hs led to more variety with which to work. In the time to follow I have learned to use the dyes to paint and screenprint my fabrics adding pattern to the elements of color and texture. The cloth that emerges from my wet (dye) studio has become the primary inspiration for my current work which are featured in the exhibit, DREAMING IN COLOR. The use of surface design techniques leads my work to be process driven. This encourages experimentation and sponteneity in my working and results in a liveliness and sense of organic movement in the resulting works. I hope you will visit the exhibit and consider the many steps that have resulted in the works you see.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

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Grounded

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Evelyn Ward, a potter who makes functional stoneware with salt fired glazes, has this to say about her work for the show. “Working with clay keeps me grounded. My time in the studio is a place where I can get distracted from life and totally absorbed in my work. Throwing repetitive forms has become unconscious, almost like a song known by heart, one whose lyrics are never hard to remember. Working on new forms awakens me and keeps me interested and excited about going to the studio every day. For this show I’ll be showing a mix of new forms that I’m really excited about and some familiar ones too.”

 

In her new work for Grounded,  acrylic painter Ellie Reinhold moves away from the intensity of the human experience to focus on nature itself. Reinhold writes, “The new work slated for Grounded holds no deep psychological approach to the theme. Instead recent explorations in texture and color remain my focus and loose tree imagery continues to hold sway. The tree, in my view, is one of the Great Grounders of this world; earth bound yet far reaching, held in place yet always moving.”

 

Grounded is ushered in on painter Pat Merriman’s 80th birthday with her COURAGE series on American Women in History. The series began with a collage of women in the early 1900’s. As an academic, Pat passionately researched the history of women’s acts of courage from the early settlers to the 2016 edict that the American military can be gender neutral. As an artist, Pat then simplified these themes to create bold, colorful collages. Merriman states, “There are panels of the Suffrage movement, the Daughters of Liberty, The Trail of Tears, Latina women, African American women, and 1950’s women who read the “Feminine Mystique”– all leading toward the Equal Rights Movement.”

 

Merriman adds, “There is also a series of four profiles of North Carolina Barns, some reflecting the styles of Wolf Kahn and Milton Avery.  Barns depict the sociology of  America…styles reflect the culture of the immigrants, their life in America often began outside of the cities with the building of a barn.”

Opening Reception

June 24

6-9

 

 

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Earth Wind and Fire

unspecifiedgarry redGarry Childs
 
All of my work is formed on the potters wheel from terra-cotta clay. I apply glazes and pigments to my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather-hard” which is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not completely dry. I usually do this by spraying but sometimes also with a brush. I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns seen on my work.
unspecifiedGarry, blue
I encourage people to touch and handle my work. Pots are made with hands and they should be “looked at” with hands. Texture, particularly the contrast between the smooth glazed areas and the rougher, hard edges of the carved surface is very important. Putting both hands on a piece and moving them up-and-down allows you to truly feel the shape and the ridges left by my fingers in the soft clay. I also think it’s great fun to put your head down inside one of the big pieces and holler, the echoes are wonderful.
 
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My pots are made for people’s homes. My bowls and platters look best on tables with food being shared by families and friends, my planters and vases with someone’s favorite herb or fresh flowers. Some pieces are certainly more decorative in nature than others. Those are an expression of my joy in the process that hopefully becomes a part of someone’s day to day life.
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