Earthworks

 

Chris Graebner

My paintings fall into two general categories, botanicals and landscapes. My landscapes are drawn from my travels and are based on photos often taken out of a car window using a cell phone. Because I’m handicapped I don’t do a lot of walking, but you’d be surprised what a lot of wonderful things can be seen from the driver’s seat of an automobile! In fact, sometimes I just drive around Orange County back roads taking pictures of old barns and fields.

The paintings in this show were all done from photos taken between January 2016 and February 2017 in places as disparate as Florida, Iowa and Michigan. Three of the paintings, “At Anchor,” “Dock at the Pines” and “Deer on the Runway” are of an island in Lake Huron we’ve been going to each summer for the last few years. The Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa paintings were done from photos taken on the way back from a family wedding in South Dakota.

One of the fun things about cellphone photos is that they include GPS data allowing you to find the exact place they were taken. And, if you need more visual information from a different angle than you’ve captured in your photo you can often find it on Google street view. That doesn’t mean that my paintings are exact representations of what is in the photo, or even of what is actually in the location. I do a fair amount of editing – adding or deleting, moving things around, changing colors etc. – but you would certainly be able to match up the paintings with the photos that inspired them.

 

EARTHworks

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Garry Childs describes his technique, “All of my work is formed on the potters wheel from terra-cotta clay. I apply glazes and pigments to my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather-hard” which is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle, but is not completely dry. I usually do this by spraying, but sometimes also with a brush. I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns seen on my work.”

Chris Graebner describes her inspiration for the show, “I love to drive, especially on long trips. Every summer we go to Northern Michigan – to Lake Huron. It’s a trip I love, two days up and two days back, driving through gorgeous scenery, forests and farms. (It’s amazing how many different types of barns there are!) Last summer, in addition to the trip to Michigan, we made a 3700 mile trip to South Dakota, returning home by way of Texas and Louisiana. As usual, I did most of the driving. Driving forces me to pay attention to everything around me and I’m always amazed by the beauty. Painting is my way of possessing that beauty so I want to paint it all!  My husband is patient about taking photos with the cell phone as we sail past interesting things on the highway. My paintings in this show are all of places observed from the car, in our travels over the last year.”

Jude Lobe’s work presented in Earthworks reflects her love and respect of nature. “For this show I’m still using the method of building and deconstructing, but concentrating on the connectedness between earth, man, fauna, plants and everything else making  up the universe, and the loss that may occur if we don’t become more mindful. I like mixing mediums and love textures, which becomes a metaphor for how all things in the universe are interwoven and intertwined. My paintings in cold wax & oil, encaustics and collage are a journey to articulate on a surface an emotion I have difficulty in articulating in words.”

“Sometimes I’m on an archaeological excursion. From building up layers of colors and textures, to scraping away, scratching and uncovering what is beneath, the process leads me to new places I discover.”

Opening Reception
May 26th, 2017, 6 – 9 pm

Earth Wind and Fire

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JUDE LOBE
 
When I was a child, one might have called me a tom-boy. I spent endless days exploring the woods and parks, climbing trees and building forts near our home in Maryland. I continued my exploration of  wild and natural environments as an adult. Luckily, I lived equal distance from the Shenandoah and the Blue Ridge Mountains to Assateague and Chincoteague Islands. In these places I felt at home, peaceful, serene and wistful. 
These natural habitats give me a connection to a past, a history of bygone times. Being in these beautiful endangered landscapes gives me solace from stress and hope for a future. In this exhibit I revisit some of these places in my mind and attempt to capture the emotion I felt there and being captivated by the play of light on a rock cliff, or swaying grass in the wind.
 
My medium of choice for these landscapes is Cold Wax & Oil. The cold wax is a consistency of a paste wax. It is made of beeswax and resins. I mix it 50:50 with oil paints or earth pigments. It has the advantage of giving me the opportunity to show a history of the painting by building up layers of colors, then scratching through to reveal some of the obscured colored layers. To me it is a metaphor of the history of the landscape and how it has evolved over time. 
 
My paintings, rather than being a photographic likeness of the landscape, are rather an emotional interpretation of it with an abstract quality. My hope is that the viewer either gains a feeling of peace and hope I feel when in nature, or reminds them of a similar special place in their memory. 
 

Branching out

Branching Out

By Chris Graebner

January-Moon-(web)

When Eric Saunders, Pat Lloyd and I first talked about this show last fall and came up with a title, we thought that Branching Out would speak to the subject matter of all three of us in some way. Pat is a wood turner, Eric often photographs natural settings – trees and woods, and I was planning that my work for this show would all be botanical subjects. However, life intervened. Pat dropped out of the show, and Michael Salemi, also a wood turner, came on board. The title still worked. Then life intervened again. In December I discovered that I had cancer and that the next several months would be filled with 2 major surgeries and a lot of slow recovery. The few pieces that I had underway were not botanicals, so that connection to the show title was out. I would not have the time or considerable energy it takes to do a whole show of new botanical work.

The-Night-&-The-Moon-(web)

As I was slowly recovering from surgery I became fascinated with clouds and decided to make them the focus of a small group of paintings. Usually, clouds are just a sort of backdrop, making the sky a little more lively and realistic. They provide a bit of movement in a landscape. But in these paintings I wanted the clouds to take center stage and do all the talking – a little bit of “branching out,” if you will. I enjoy painting night scenes, so clouds at night became a natural progression – another bit of branching out.

Light-Up-the-Night-(web)

When plants get trimmed or blocked, they send out branches and move in a different direction so they can continue to grow. In similar fashion, these paintings have been a way of trimming my expectations – of moving in another direction and continuing to grow. I hope you enjoy them!

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Branching Out

April postcard RGB Branching out

Eric Saunders, Chris Graebner, and Mike Salemi are “Branching Out” with their new work.

Eric Saunders is a photographer who uses many techniques to digitally enhance his photographs. For Saunders [branching out] “can mean branches growing on a tree, or it can mean exploring new directions in technique and content.” He explains, “In the past few years, I have made photographic images that are literally of branches on a tree, and images that pursue new directions from outdoor landscapes using various digital enhancements, and images that feature man-made subjects.”

Saunders will have 15-20 new images in the show.

Appropriate for Branching Out, wood is Mike Salemi’s medium. The newest member of The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Salemi describes his love of wood and his process as a backdrop for the pieces he will present at the April show. Salemi says, “I have always liked working with wood. While a graduate student, I would escape to the campus woodcraft studio each day to find peace and a sense of satisfaction. After I retired, I decided to make a serious effort to develop as a wood turner. In my work, I attempt to strike a balance between classic design prescriptions and my belief that many blocks of wood have something to say. The former leads me to create pleasing proportions in my spindles and pleasing curves in my bowls. The latter leads me to look to the wood for suggestions of shape and texture. I am particularly attracted to blocks of wood that have started to decay. A partially decayed piece of wood can reward the turner with dramatic color and pattern but requires that the turner navigate voids. Handling the negative space in a funky block of wood is a challenge worth taking.”

Chris Graebner is a painter whose work is often inspired by nature. Graebner refects, “One of my earliest memories is watching in awe as my mother painted the oak tree in our front yard. Instead of a brown stick with a green blob on top, her tree had bark, branches, and individual leaves. I was so amazed; I wanted to do that too!”

Working primarily in oil, Graebner will introduce new paintings this April in Branching Out.

Opening Reception

April 29

6-9

 

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It’s all about the story

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It’s All About The Story at The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts

In the three novellas that make up “Local Souls,” Allan Gurganus brings to life the complicated relationships of people who are as dark and colorful as the North Carolina town they inhabit. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict these stories of survival, betrayal, love, longing, and liberation through visual imagery in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate Southern fiction and local art.

About the author:
Allan Gurganus is an American short story writer, essayist, and novelist best known for his ground breaking debut novel, “Oldest Confederate Widow Tells All,” which has sold over four million copies. Educated at Sarah Lawrence and The University of Iowa, he has taught at Sarah Lawrence, The Iowa Writer’s Workshop, and both Stanford and Duke Universities. Among his prizes are an Ingram Merrill Award and a 2006 Guggenheim fellowship. He lives in Hillsborough, NC.

Opening Reception

February 26

6-9

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Resolutions 2016

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The Hillsborough Gallery Of Arts Celebrates NC Artists With A Statewide Juried Show

RESOLUTIONS 2016, the title of The Hillsborough Gallery of Art’s second statewide juried show, is an exhibition of the work of artists from across North Carolina.

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned fine art and fine craft gallery located in historic Hillsborough, North Carolina, will celebrate the start of the New Year by hosting a juried fine art and fine craft exhibit from January 4 to January 24, 2016. Titled Resolutions 2016, the exhibition includes the work of two-dimensional and three-dimensional fine artists from throughout North Carolina.  All works are for sale.

Guest juror for the awards will be Dr. Peter Nisbet, Chief Curator and Interim Director of the Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC. Nisbet has extensive national and international experience in collection development and exhibitions. Formerly Curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum at the Harvard Art Museum, he was responsible for a collection of 39,000 works of art and played a leading role in the reconceptualization and revitalization of the museum. Nisbet holds a BA and MA from Cambridge University and a PhD in the History of Art from Yale Universiity

Opening Reception

January 8th

6-9

 

 

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