Go Figure

Domain” is part of a series of paintings using hooped skirts as a metaphor for the constrictions society places on women. In this piece, I wanted to depict a woman’s life as defined by her home, which becomes the empire over which she has control.

Before starting, I decided to use the old masters’ palette of colors – Yellow Ochre, Payne’s Grey, and Burnt Umber – to which I added Mars Black and Titanium White.

I covered the entire canvas in a thin layer of modeling paste and then fashioned the skirt and figure with another layer. I built up the background with more modeling paste. Next, I drew the scene that I imagined going on under the skirt with pencil and began painting. I painted the surfaces where I applied the second layer of texture brown and then wiped away the excess, exposing the “thumbprint” of the painting.

in-progress-1

I moved through the rooms from left to right, using masking tape to help me keep the architectural lines straight. In the ballroom, I decided to apply modeling paste to the pillars and the drapes to give them more dimension. Later I added texure to the chandelier too.

 

in-progress-2

After I completed the scene under the skirt I began on the figure. I wanted her dress to have the look of polished stone, as if the woman has become a part of her home.

I played with different colors for the background, finally settling on shades of Sienna that I highlighted with Ochre and Gold to mimic the sky that you can see through the windows. I then echoed the texture and pattern of the background in the walls of the ballroom.

in-progress-3

I tried several different versions of the headdress and finally chose to add some hair to frame her face and a pendant to connect the hues of the background with those below the skirt.

Domain” was complete.

domain-4

With thanks to my husband, Harold Carmel for documenting this process.

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Go Figure

linda and Marcy and Lynn

Linda Carmel is a painter who creates richly textured canvases that focus on the experience of women today. She writes, “The paintings in Go Figure! explore the transition from girlhood to womanhood where outer appearance becomes circumscribed and the carefree girl is hidden.”

In this series she has used the hooped skirt as a metaphor for how women worked within these confines to find autonomy.  She explains, “When girls enter womanhood, both historically and culturally, there are often confining restrictions of dress and behavior that apply.  In times and places where women were unable to voice their opinions, they embroidered their thoughts onto household fabrics and clothing. I have incorporated these unspoken words into many of my new paintings.”

Carmel adds, “Women’s fashion has come a long way from the era of the hoop skirt, but women are still forced to dress the part and hide elements of themselves in order to shatter the remains of the glass ceiling.”

 

Lynn Wartski’s imaginative sculptures portray the human body as art dolls.  Wartski states, “This medium allows me to explore and play with a wide variety of materials and techniques yet still maintain visual cohesion. Inspiration for these small scale figures comes from places both common and unexpected. I delve into the worlds of art, literature, mythology, legend, everyday life.” Lynn uses a variety of materials in her mixed media dolls, but it is her use of metal that links these dolls to her earlier work.

Wartski adds, “For Go Figure!, I have continued to concentrate on gesture and expression.  Though there is no one theme that unifies all my sculptures, there is the intent for each to represent a moment within some narrative. My hope is that the viewer will be drawn into the small details of each doll and hopefully enter into the story she may have to tell.”

 

Marcy Lansman writes of her new work for Go Figure!: “Many of these paintings express my nostalgia for a kind of childhood play that seems rare today, nostalgia for a time when children ran around outdoors uncoached and unscheduled.  I’m intrigued by the excitement and collaboration that emerges from that kind of spontaneity. Several paintings are based on fifty-year old photos of my sons.  I’ve solicited candid photos from friends and family, but often what I get back are smiling faces looking straight into the camera.  So for new subject matter, I’ve taken to photographing children in local public playgrounds.”

Opening Reception

Friday, September 30

6-9

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Dreaming in Color

Sky is Bluer Thank the SeaAlice Levinson

TEXTILE can be a confusing label for a piece of artwork. It truly is an umbrella term which encompasses a wide range of work from quilts to weavings, from fashion to tapestries. Each of these categories of textile is identified by the manner in which the cloth and/or fiber is assembled (e.g., sewn, woven, or quilted). When I started work with textiles,I was drawn to the texture, handof cloth. I worked with cloth I sourced from stores, scrap, or vintage collections. My interest was to use it to assemble visually interesting compositions.

Most often these compositions also had a thread of narrative at their core.

The more I worked, the more I encountered a variety of fabrics, the more I came to appreciate the role pattern and color played as I assembled my compositions.

Alice'e Stash

My stash of acquired fabric grew. My facility with needle and thread increased. All was good. Then one day I watched a demonstration of cloth dying and a new door opened for me, I was entering the world of surface design, yet another sub-category that falls within the rubric of textile. The hallmark of surface design is the manipulation of the surface of cloth through the application of techniques and substances to create a unique textile.

My facination with the process led, to the first of several workshops to learn

to dye cloth. I learned to prepare carefully the dye concentrates and then begin the magic of turning white cloth to any and every hue. Initially I was limited by my lack of experience and expertise in managing the dying process. As someone once said, practice makes perfect.Well, in my case, practice has made good enough!It was a heady experience to create my own rainbow stash of fabric. From early efforts with muslin and cotton sheeting, I progressed to working with embossed and textured cotton,linen, wool, velvet and silk. Each particular fabric takes the dye in its own way and each has its own particular texture. More learning,hs led to more variety with which to work. In the time to follow I have learned to use the dyes to paint and screenprint my fabrics adding pattern to the elements of color and texture. The cloth that emerges from my wet (dye) studio has become the primary inspiration for my current work which are featured in the exhibit, DREAMING IN COLOR. The use of surface design techniques leads my work to be process driven. This encourages experimentation and sponteneity in my working and results in a liveliness and sense of organic movement in the resulting works. I hope you will visit the exhibit and consider the many steps that have resulted in the works you see.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

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Dreaming in Color

 

 

pringle's vasePringle Teetor

The theme of “Dreaming in Color” is perfect for me with regards to an art show.  I have always loved colors, mixing them, keeping them pure and combining colors with gold and silver in their chemistry to create new and beautiful colors. In one of the groups of pieces I have used colors in a haphazard way, combining and applying colors in a painterly fashion or as lines of three.  I studied painting in college and loved the work of Morris Louis. He would layer veils and rivulets of color over and over each other until you couldn’t see where one started and another began. I wanted to translate this into glass by using colors as strokes applied over and over to create a bold statement on glass instead of canvas.

The Incalmo bowls are made using a long and complicated process. Usually they are made with two or more glass blowers assembling each section or bubble of color one at a time.  Since I mostly work alone I had to figure out a way to produce these pieces with pure sections of color stacked on top of each other. I’ve always been inspired by the work of Boyd Sugiki and after visiting his studio in Seattle 5 years ago I decided to give his technique a try.  Long tubes of each color are blown exactly the same and annealed. Then they are cut into sections on a diamond saw. These sections then have to be ground and polished one at a time on a flat lapidary wheel.

Pringle's stiped bowl

When I return to the studio, I set the sections up in order in small electric kiln that heats them up to about 1000 degrees. Since they change color once they are hot, I map out carefully the order of the sections.  Then I pick up one section at a time on a hot pipe and stack them on top of each other. The fit must be exact!  Once the pieces are stacked, all the lines and grooves melted out and the connections are tight, I gather more glass over the entire stack and form the pieces.  This is time consuming and very precise work, the complete opposite of the organic painterly pieces.

Many of the pieces in this show are sandblasted. When glass is shiny it will reflect light but when the surface is sandblasted to a delicate matt, the colors will glow with the light.  There are some new clear pieces sandblasted using a medium to create a unique pattern. Words are combined with doodles, doodles that I have been doodling since I was a child.

As I gather my thoughts around what is now the 10th anniversary of opening our glassblowing studio and the 10th anniversary of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and my membership in this gallery, I am truly amazed at how lucky I have been to be able to do what I love everyday!

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Dreaming in Color

Lolette Guthrie

_The Color Of Summer

I am a landscape painter. I work largely from memory so my paintings are reflections on what I experienced at a particular time in a particular place. They are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I continually strive to capture the ephemeral nature of the light remembered. I begin each piece with a general idea of time and place and then let the painting tell me where and how far to go. It is as though I am observing a conversation between the brush and the paint on the canvas and as a result I am never sure what the end result will be because at some point each piece takes on a life of its own and I just follow along. Long interest in composition, color relationships and the importance of the edges of a piece has led to increasingly spare landscapes and abstracted landscapes.

Skyfire

For “Dreaming In Color” I concentrated on exploring the use of color, especially in the sky, in such a way that it would almost alone give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather. In most pieces the foreground is the accent note. I have also included two abstracted landscapes based on the geography of Ocracoke Island as it sits just below Hatteras Island between the Pamlico Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. They are explorations of the rich summer colors found in the sea and sky and the sound.

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Dreaming in Color

 

 

August postcard RGBAlice Levinson, a textile artist, writes of her experience preparing for the show: “In October, 2015 I participated in the X Florence Biennale in Florence, Italy, an international exhibition of contemporary art. My body of clothworks was awarded the Lorenzo di Medici Bronze Medal in Textile Arts. These works will be among those I will be showing in the DREAMING in COLOR exhibit in Hillsborough. Starting with white cloth, I experiment freely with dye, pigments, and printing techniques to create cloth which is complex in texture and rich in visual interest. The fabric is cut or torn and pieces are mixed and melded as I assemble my work. Each composition is built of successive layering of fabric and thread. I aim to create works that engage the viewer and delight the eye with movement and vibrant color. Raw edges are honored and loose threads purposefully retained. My intuitive work process encourages spontaneity and experimentation. By nature, I am an observer of people and the natural world. Musings, scribbled phrases, and gestural sketches follow. These suggest themes, visual motifs, a palette. My intention in place, I reach for the cloth and then the magic begins. Image, line, and pattern find their way though my hands into the work in a remarkable way. My task is to stay open and responsive to the ‘voice’ of the cloth. ‘Listening ‘ with my hands as well as my eyes, I work to facilitate the creative flow. This isn’t easy, but is always satisfying, and often, surprising.”

Glass artist  Pringle Teetor describes her new work for the show, “Colors, bright and bold run through my work in many variations. The combinations of different metals in some of the glass colors produce spectacular reactions. Many years ago I studied painting and the artist Morris Lewis had a huge impact on my work. Now, I’ve taken this vision into my glasswork applying colors to create bold, irregular stripes on my vessels.  Another use of color in my work is in my incalmo bowl pieces. Incalmo is fusing together multiple glass pieces to make a single vessel. These have to be done very carefully and require a great amount of precision. I’ve combined 4-6 different colors in these vessels to make wide stripes in the bowls – some colors are analogous, others are contrasting to make a bold statement.”

Lolette Guthrie writes, “I am a landscape painter.  I work largely from memory so my paintings are reflections on what I experienced at a particular time in a particular place. They are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I continually strive to capture the ephemeral nature of the light remembered. I begin each piece with a general idea of time and place and then let the painting tell me where and how far to go. As a result, I am never sure what the end result will be because at some point each piece takes on a life of its own and I just follow along. For Dreaming In Color, I concentrated on exploring the use of color, especially in the sky, that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather.  In most pieces, the foreground is the accent note.”

Opening Reception

Friday August 26

6-9

 

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Colorful Language

Ali Givens

In my new fabric collages for Colorful Language I have continued to experiment working from a small to large format. First I design a small collage that serves as a sketch for my larger pieces. I find that it’s much easier and more fun to figure out the composition on a small scale. My friend/painter Lolette Guthrie reminded me recently that designs that work well small usually translate well into larger pieces. My favorite challenge for this show was enlarging a very small collage, “The Yellow Chair,” into “Modigliani and My Yellow Chair,” which is almost 7 feet by 4 feet. It took many layers of fabric and touches of paint to get all of the angles right in the small version, which was about the size of a piece of notebook paper. The challenge then for the big piece, “Modigliani and My Yellow Chair” was sewing something so large which physically can be difficult to handle and can sometimes require an extra pair of hands (usually my sister’s or my daughter’s).

 (little one)Ali's small one
I feel happy that the fabric collages both large and small capture the feeling of a simple, intimate space–my apartment.
(big one)
Ali's big one
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ART from shows