ColorFull

Pringle Teetor

I dearly miss those hot and sultry summers with five minute rainstorms in the afternoon that turn the streets into steaming ribbons of asphalt and bring rainbows all over the city. I especially love the bright colors of pastel madras clothing that, to me, are summers in New Orleans, where I was born. When I started working on cane pieces this winter, these memories were my biggest inspirations in my work. Patterns of lines in different colors are most easily produced by a complicated ancient Italian technique called cane work.

Cane refers to rods of glass with color that can be simple, containing a single color on the inside (core cane) or complex with strands of one or several colors in pattern. Veil cane is where you have a color on the outside over a clear core, or at times a core of another color. Pulling cane takes a lot of time, especially if you want different types of cane in many different colors.

My partner, Dana, and I spent a good bit of time this year pulling a lot of cane in many different colors. We would take a large a “gather” of colored or clear glass, heat it and shape it a number of times. For veil cane, we first make a “cup” of color, then stuffing it with a mass of clear glass. With a metal rod at each end, we would stretch the glass to a length of 30 to 50 feet. Once it is cooled, it is broken into pieces anywhere from 5 to 8 inches long. These pieces are carefully laid out on a kiln shelf and heated in the reheating furnace until fused, then rolled up on the end of a pipe. Finally we begin to blow glass! It is a long process but the outcome is amazing. With many colors and types of cane, the possibilities are endless, which you an see in the show Colorful!

 

 

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ColorFull

Chris Graebner‘s paintings are often based on images gathered while traveling. The paintings in ColorFull are drawn from trips, foreign and domestic, taken over the last ten years. Says Graebner, “In the past few months I’ve spent hours going through my photo files choosing images that speak me – images that carry me back to a specific place and time. Once I’ve selected the images, I must choose the size, surface and medium best suited for each.” Graebner generally works on 4-6 paintings simultaneously so that the layers of each painting have time to dry while working on others. “Due to the back to back transitions of my son’s wedding, my husband’s retirement and our move to Elon last fall, I was out of the studio from August through January. Now, as we settle into our new home, I am again beginning to feel the grounding that being in the studio provides in my life. I hope that tranquility is manifest to the viewer in these new paintings.”

The majority of Pringle Teetor‘s pieces for this show are cane work, a centuries old Venetian technique of putting stripes of color and patterns into blown glass. “I’ve always had a broad color palette and here I am able to explore endless combinations of color patterns in clean lines.” The cane used in these pieces have either a colored core with clear on the outside, or veil cane, which has color on the outside with a clear core. Teetor made her veil cane with a variety of transparent or translucent colors, noting that as you look through the piece, the density of the color changes, causing interesting variations of color. Some pieces mix both types of cane, while others used strictly one or the other. In addition, several use varying size lines of contrasting colors to resemble plaids.

Lolette Guthrie is primarily a landscape painter. “Since I mostly paint from memory, my paintings are depictions of my recollections of the colors and the quality of light I experienced at a particular place and at a particular moment in time. For ColorFull, I thought about marveling at sunsets at the coast, remembering a pink and soft orange sky over Lake Jordan, the explosion of color when the sun shines through a stormy sky, the beauty of a broom straw field on a cloudy day.”

 

 

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Orange County Studio Tour

This marks the 23nd year that the Orange County Artists Guild will host its Annual Open Studio Tour. During the first two weekends in November, more than eighty artists located throughout Orange County, including Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and surrounding areas will be participating in this juried event and opening their studios to visitors who will discover where the creative design happens!

For the seventh year, Pringle Teetor and Linda Carmel will be showing together at Carmel’s home studio, 101 Huntington Drive, Chapel Hill, #45 on the tour. Pringle’s blown glass and Linda’s textured paintings complement each other perfectly. There will be plenty to see and touch.

Ali Givens joins the studio tour for her first year. Ali creates fabric collages that are landscapes, cityscapes and still lifes sewn from colorful batiks and other natural fibers. Her studio is #12 on the tour located at 3611 Mijos Lane, Chapel Hill.

Lolette Guthrie paints primarily with oil. She builds up her canvases layer by layer. Each piece begins with a loose idea that explores the beauty of the natural world. Her studio, #67, is located in Chapel Hill at 113 Rhododendron Drive.

Marcy Lansman returns to the tour for her 12th year. Her new studio, #35, is located at 750 Weaver Dairy Road, Apt. 198, Chapel Hill. Marcy paints with acrylics and her work has evolved from realistic to more abstract, expressive of personal insights and emotions.

Eduardo Lapetina’s studio is located at 318 North Estes Drive, Chapel Hill, #55 on the tour map. This is his ninth year participating on the tour. Lapetina will show new abstract paintings with vibrant colors and in various sizes including very large pieces. His paintings are worked in complete solitude. They represent the discoveries of the unconscious mind. In the artist’s words, “They hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, and the magic of a private, secret language.”

Ellie Reinhold is joining the tour for the fifth year. She is #60 on the tour and will welcome you at her studio off Roosevelt Drive in Chapel Hill, in the neighborhood across from Cafe Driade. Reinhold’s explores vibrant landscapes using color, brushwork, and iconic imagery.

Michael Salemi is a woodturner who is showing jointly with Miriam Sagasti at her studio (#22). Michael’s work includes both traditional woodturning forms: bowls, plates and platters, and unusual pieces such as ikebanas.

Alice Levinson will be exhibiting her contemporary wall-hung textile pieces. Each is rich in color and texture, and composed of hand-dyed fabric, densely sewn. Her studio is #15 on the map, 3604 Pasture Road, Hillsborough.

Jason Smith creates one of a kind metal sculptures in steel and copper using reclaimed material. His sculpture is abstract. The manipulation of form in space allows the viewer to feel rhythm and movement in his compositions. Jason’s new studio is #2 on the map, 1709 NC HWY 86N, Hillsborough.

OCAG’s Open Studio Tour is a rare opportunity for art lovers from Orange County and beyond to meet artists in their places of work, to view and purchase art directly from the artist, and in many instances to watch as artists demonstrate how they create their pieces. Studio Tour brochures and maps of participants’ studios are available at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and other area locations or on the Guild website: http://www.OrangeCountyArtistsGuild.com

Many artists on this year’s tour will have work in the OCAG Preview Exhibit at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Their work will be on display from October 23 through November 12, 2017. This preview show is a wonderful opportunity for a first look at the work on the tour and can help you plan your tour route.

Opening Reception

Friday October 27

6-9

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Three Perspectives

Pringle Teetor

The pieces I created for this show came out of frustration and boredom. Seriously! When two artists work together in a glass studio for years on end but only one day a week, you tend to fall into a pattern of “normalcy”. We just get used to doing the same things, creating the same type of pieces because we want to make the most of the “bench time”.

One morning on the way to the studio, my partner Dana and I were discussing my frustration with a certain color application I had been trying to figure out how to do by myself. He mentioned watching an artist many years ago at Corning Museum of Glass layer small bits of different colors together. He had the assistant bringing each color to him one at a time, fully melted, as he piled on color on top of another, like building an ice cream cone with many layers. But instead of then blowing the piece directly from this pile of color, he then turned it on a different axis and created the piece. Since I mostly work by myself, I had not considered this!

We played with this technique that day, piling 5-10 colors together and took this one step farther by flattening the blown piece. Flattening a round glass form is something that is better done with an assistant and we had not done any flat pieces in several years. Inspiration was reborn!

The next week I came in determined to do the “color sundaes” by myself. I took it a bit farther by layering 15 -25 colors together. My interest in the chemistry of glass color took over and I would add strings of other colors here and there. I wanted to use colors that reacted differently to the one next to it to create interesting effects. Once these “sundaes” were created, they were removed from the pipe and annealed for the next time Dana and I worked together. So, before the final piece, hours of work had already gone into the creation of just the colors.

Since glass colors doesn’t always play well together, it became quite a challenge. Some colors remain stiffer when molten, while others would be so hot that they would blow thinner than the rest of the colors. During the flattening process (using large cork paddles) the glass is compressed under pressure and if there is a spot that is too thin or too hot, it could be disastrous. The colors were sandwiched to create the effect of an abstract painting, which brought me back to painting roots, many years before glass, bringing together the past and the present in a creative way. I hope you enjoy these pieces!

 

 

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Three Perspectives

Lolette Guthrie writes, “I am primarily a landscape painter, however, my viewpoint is different from plien air painters in that I paint largely from memory striving to discover the essence of the subject rather than the reality.  I want to capture the ephemeral nature of light and a mood that is timeless. This has led to increasingly simplified/spare landscapes and at times abstractions derived from them. Resonant color is the core of my process. I juxtapose passages of saturated color with more muted tones and through the application of many layers of pigment and glaze I try to create subtle color and value shifts that provide a degree of luminosity.

For this show, I concentrated on painting an interesting sky that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather. In most pieces, the foreground is almost an afterthought.  In a few, I explored the idea of reality and abstraction through the use of trompe l’oeil painting. When one looks at the sky, one sees refracted light and reflected colors not the reality of colorless air and moisture. Is, therefore, a painting of a recognizable object, landscape or skyscape real?  Or is it more like an abstracted memory or dream of reality?”

Photographer Eric Saunders writes of his new work, “With my photographs I try to communicate the beauty and intrique of abstract art, and transient moments in nature and life. I look to outdoor landscapes, natural and urban, and capture them in color, or black and white.

I am mostly self-taught as a photographer. Previously I studied classical piano, and then worked as a corporate computer programmer. My goal as a photographer is to “see” abstract compositions and communicate them with precise technical control. I shoot in RAW, and edit using Adobe Bridge and Photoshop CS5. I print my images using an Epson 3880 printer.”

Glass artist Pringle Teetor is constantly mesmerized by the dance of color, light, and fluidity in glass. Teetor states, “My forms are mostly functional vessels, but this year I have created pieces with a more sculptural form in mind.  My new flattened vases capture multiple colors and are like abstract paintings in glass. I like to play with the chemistry of color to produce unique effects in each piece of blown glass. Then, I incorporate copper, silver and gold to create new reactions between the glass layers.  The results are not always predictable, but the outcomes are often exciting.”

Opening Reception
Friday
August 25
6-9
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it’s all about the story

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“Out Of Abaton” is John Bemis‘ new interpretation of the well-loved tale of Pinocchio. Just as the wooden puppet changes into a human boy, Bemis transforms this classic story with fantastic creatures, alchemy, and the mystery of human emotion–all woven into the magical and glorious landscape of Italy. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict this fantasic tale in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate rich story telling and local art.

About John Claude Bemis:

John Claude Bemis is an award-winning author and also an inspiring speaker and musician. Bemis grew up in North Carolina and became an elementary school teacher after studying Art History and Education at UNC-Chapel Hill. His experiences of reading, exploring, and teaching naturally evolved into a career of writing. He received the Exellence in Teaching Award from UNC Chapel Hill’s School of Education and was chosen as North Carolina’s Piedmont Laureate for Children’s Literature in 2013. He lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

Reception

Feb 24

6-9

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Dreaming in Color

 

 

August postcard RGBAlice Levinson, a textile artist, writes of her experience preparing for the show: “In October, 2015 I participated in the X Florence Biennale in Florence, Italy, an international exhibition of contemporary art. My body of clothworks was awarded the Lorenzo di Medici Bronze Medal in Textile Arts. These works will be among those I will be showing in the DREAMING in COLOR exhibit in Hillsborough. Starting with white cloth, I experiment freely with dye, pigments, and printing techniques to create cloth which is complex in texture and rich in visual interest. The fabric is cut or torn and pieces are mixed and melded as I assemble my work. Each composition is built of successive layering of fabric and thread. I aim to create works that engage the viewer and delight the eye with movement and vibrant color. Raw edges are honored and loose threads purposefully retained. My intuitive work process encourages spontaneity and experimentation. By nature, I am an observer of people and the natural world. Musings, scribbled phrases, and gestural sketches follow. These suggest themes, visual motifs, a palette. My intention in place, I reach for the cloth and then the magic begins. Image, line, and pattern find their way though my hands into the work in a remarkable way. My task is to stay open and responsive to the ‘voice’ of the cloth. ‘Listening ‘ with my hands as well as my eyes, I work to facilitate the creative flow. This isn’t easy, but is always satisfying, and often, surprising.”

Glass artist  Pringle Teetor describes her new work for the show, “Colors, bright and bold run through my work in many variations. The combinations of different metals in some of the glass colors produce spectacular reactions. Many years ago I studied painting and the artist Morris Lewis had a huge impact on my work. Now, I’ve taken this vision into my glasswork applying colors to create bold, irregular stripes on my vessels.  Another use of color in my work is in my incalmo bowl pieces. Incalmo is fusing together multiple glass pieces to make a single vessel. These have to be done very carefully and require a great amount of precision. I’ve combined 4-6 different colors in these vessels to make wide stripes in the bowls – some colors are analogous, others are contrasting to make a bold statement.”

Lolette Guthrie writes, “I am a landscape painter.  I work largely from memory so my paintings are reflections on what I experienced at a particular time in a particular place. They are also always paintings of light and atmosphere as I continually strive to capture the ephemeral nature of the light remembered. I begin each piece with a general idea of time and place and then let the painting tell me where and how far to go. As a result, I am never sure what the end result will be because at some point each piece takes on a life of its own and I just follow along. For Dreaming In Color, I concentrated on exploring the use of color, especially in the sky, that almost alone would give the viewer a sense of space, light, time of day, temperature, and weather.  In most pieces, the foreground is the accent note.”

Opening Reception

Friday August 26

6-9

 

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