Beyond the Surface

Pat Merriman

 

This has been a year of many twists and turns so my current art reflects colorful baby animals, even more colorful flowers; some valuing Georgia OKeefe, and 3 landscapes; two in N C.

 

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Dreaming in Color

Sky is Bluer Thank the SeaAlice Levinson

TEXTILE can be a confusing label for a piece of artwork. It truly is an umbrella term which encompasses a wide range of work from quilts to weavings, from fashion to tapestries. Each of these categories of textile is identified by the manner in which the cloth and/or fiber is assembled (e.g., sewn, woven, or quilted). When I started work with textiles,I was drawn to the texture, handof cloth. I worked with cloth I sourced from stores, scrap, or vintage collections. My interest was to use it to assemble visually interesting compositions.

Most often these compositions also had a thread of narrative at their core.

The more I worked, the more I encountered a variety of fabrics, the more I came to appreciate the role pattern and color played as I assembled my compositions.

Alice'e Stash

My stash of acquired fabric grew. My facility with needle and thread increased. All was good. Then one day I watched a demonstration of cloth dying and a new door opened for me, I was entering the world of surface design, yet another sub-category that falls within the rubric of textile. The hallmark of surface design is the manipulation of the surface of cloth through the application of techniques and substances to create a unique textile.

My facination with the process led, to the first of several workshops to learn

to dye cloth. I learned to prepare carefully the dye concentrates and then begin the magic of turning white cloth to any and every hue. Initially I was limited by my lack of experience and expertise in managing the dying process. As someone once said, practice makes perfect.Well, in my case, practice has made good enough!It was a heady experience to create my own rainbow stash of fabric. From early efforts with muslin and cotton sheeting, I progressed to working with embossed and textured cotton,linen, wool, velvet and silk. Each particular fabric takes the dye in its own way and each has its own particular texture. More learning,hs led to more variety with which to work. In the time to follow I have learned to use the dyes to paint and screenprint my fabrics adding pattern to the elements of color and texture. The cloth that emerges from my wet (dye) studio has become the primary inspiration for my current work which are featured in the exhibit, DREAMING IN COLOR. The use of surface design techniques leads my work to be process driven. This encourages experimentation and sponteneity in my working and results in a liveliness and sense of organic movement in the resulting works. I hope you will visit the exhibit and consider the many steps that have resulted in the works you see.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

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ART from shows

Grounded

 

Ellie Reinhold

Asked at Grounded’s opening reception what I was thinking when I created a particular painting, I admitted that the creative process behind my new work is fairly nonverbal. Those familiar with my figurative pieces know that words are integral to their birth; they are filled with narrative, metaphor, poetry, emotion and dreams. Not so with my abstracts/landscapes.

This isn’t to say that my landscapes are quiet paintings, usually quite the opposite. Years ago they began as, and often remain, an exercise in intensity: Color! Mark! Texture! Pattern! Mayhem and fray! However, with some of my new work, I feel as though I am finally beginning to step back and see the forest instead of just the trees.

EllieReinhold_FOREST TOTEM_36x48_price-1325_scaled4web_4.5 tall_P1090648

Certain pieces in Grounded have a quiet about them that is new to my landscapes. I’m still obsessively working with circle and tree forms, still focusing on texture, surface, and mark, but with the exhibit’s larger paintings and my work in progress, I find I’m continually paring back my complex, intense compositions. It plays out as a give and take. I build the imagery, take it away. Build again, take it away. Struggling on the canvas to find a particular balance, to reveal what the painting wants to be.

This struggle can yield an intense surface, but, with the end note of taking away,  a quieter painting, one presenting a more meditative vision. I am pleased to find that by playing at the line between abstraction and representation, these paintings hint at the moving complexity and depth of our experience in nature.
    Ellie Reinhold_NIGHT CYCLE_Grounded_Publicity_P1090722 copy

 

 

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ART from shows

 

Luminous

What the Mystery of Us Knows

What the Mystery of Us Knows

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ART from shows

Not Alone

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Together Three Hillsborough Gallery Artists Explore Being Not Alone

 

Three unique artists are featured this month at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Fused glass artist Mark Kinsella, potter Garry Childs and painter Marcy Lansman will be exhibiting their newest work in a show entitled “Not Alone.”

 

Mark Kinsella writes that Not Alone is an appropriate title for an art exhibit. Says Kinsella, “The process of creating can be a solitary endeavor but once the work is complete it moves into to the realm of not alone. If you happen to be in a gallery looking at a piece of art and you are the only one in the room, you are not alone. The artist will always have a presence in the room and you will be sharing their vision and experience. You are also sharing the space with the artist’s muse, whether the muse was a person, event, or nature. So you see, not alone is what you are when viewing the art; and not alone is what the artist has created, intentionally or not.”

“My work is sometimes functional, sometimes sculptural, or some pieces can be both depending on the preferences of the collector. I’m inspired by nature, images in movies, life experiences and I draw on my photography background to help with composition and color combinations.”

“I’ve been working with glass for more than 10 years and I’m still developing my technique. I am not beholden to one type of process but try to incorporate all that I’ve learned into my work. I’m always evolving and changing, trying new styles, and producing different and fresh work.”

“I truly believe that working with glass is a metaphor for life. Things can be very random and seemingly disconnected but with patience, creativity, and a little hard work, one can pull it all together into something beautiful. I’m motivated to leave the world in better shape than when I arrived and feel that I can do that by creating art that could possibly last for hundreds of years.”

“Not Alone also aptly describes Garry Childs philosophy as a potter. He writes, “It is very important to me that my work be accessible. My pots are intended for people’s homes. My bowls and platters look best on tables with food being shared by families and friends, my planters and vases with someone’s favorite herb or fresh flowers. Some pieces are certainly more decorative in nature than others. Those are an expression of my joy in the process that hopefully becomes a part of someone’s day-to-day life.”

“All of my work is formed on the potter’s wheel from terra-cotta clay. I apply glazes to my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather-hard” that is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not completely dry. I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns seen on my work.”

“While the shape and form of my pots continues to be my primary interest, I will be introducing some new work in this show. Color and pattern are used for emphasis. I will also be taking the opportunity to bring in more of my larger pieces than I usually have on display at the gallery.”

In writing about her approach to this show, Marcy Lansman writes, “Looking at a dark landscape I had painted, I imagined silhouetted figures walking up a hill. That image inspired Not Alone, the first in a series of paintings in which silhouetted figures, some alone, some in groups, move in a common direction as if toward a common goal. The works in this exhibit, also entitled Not Alone,” are a further exploration of that original idea. In one, figures burdened with bundles and suitcases walk solemnly against a background of crumbling buildings. In another, the figures look upward, seemingly drawn toward a brighter place. All are a contemplation of the journeys we share and the sense in which we make these journeys alone or with others.

Please join us for a Reception

June 26th

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