Serious Fun

 

 

Nell Chandler

For our show Serious Fun I found myself in a few different modes. First I wanted to reach back to my earlier mostly narrative line but add a more light a airy feel to it. I worked with copper and my etched brass but added a hinged sterling component to it.

I also got inspired by a collaborative piece I did with Pringle Teeter when she asked me to make a chain for her Hunter’s Globe in our All about the Story Exhibit. The more the world around me seemed to becoming unhinged the more obsessed I became with hinges and I made a couple of necklaces and bracelets that were created mostly of hinges. I loved the light and airy feel they have.

Then I got in a mood to work on some of my serious work of a more tailored line. I felt like I was searching for some sort of stability.

All the while I was reading books, magazines and watching tutorials on how to fire enamel during the slow times on my shifts at the gallery. I have wanted to learn torch enameling for a long time. I began ordering the things I knew I would need and one day I sat down with my book and began experimenting. I loved it from the first firing I did! I found I could mix my light and airy component to the sturdy and stable piece of enamel and find a comfortable balance.

I loved the way my friends and family and gallery folks reacted to my newest line at our opening! I loved that so many people wanted to try it on and hold it in their hands. And having my exhibit along with Ali Givens and Michele Yellin, with all their big bold happy colors made our title Serious Fun fit perfectly into the space..

 

Go Figure

Lynn Wartski
A big part of the joy of creating art can come in experiencing the reactions of others.  I enjoy watching people in the gallery approach my figure sculptures for a closer look.  They have the exact opposite effect of an expansive painting where a step back will get the best view. Their scale as art dolls requires the viewer to approach, crouch down, and perhaps walk around. It is in this intimate proximity that each piece can reveal all the little surprises and details I have worked in to the final design. It is rewarding to have those who appreciate my work take note and tell me and others what they see there.
cello_secrets_wartski
I experienced several of these moments at the opening reception of Go Figure!  One woman viewing my piece “Cello”, asked if I had myself played the instrument.  I replied that I had not, and asked what had made her ask.  She said that she had played the cello, and that I nailed not just the posture of the figure, but that her hand, wrist, and finger positions were spot on.  I told her that I had in fact spent time pouring over images of cellists for that exact reason.
A couple was looking quite carefully at “Getting Lift”.  The husband asked his wife to walk this way to see the stitching on her helmet, just as the wife told him to come to the back so that he could see how I had laced the wings on to her back.  They both told me that it truly appeared that she was just about to take off from her base, and inquired what the key chained to her belt unlocked.
Others remarked that they didn’t truly appreciate “Secrets” until they were able to get up real close and see the expression on her face, or the fact that her boots just happened to match the fabric of her dress bodice. Of “Lacing III”, one viewer told me that she could really see the dancer’s concentration to her task.
A number of people told me that they could place themselves right in the moment I tried to capture with “Sunshine on a Cloudy Day”.  They all noted the joy and freedom of the figure despite the weather she was probably experiencing.
sunshine_-wartski
Perhaps most rewarding, were the comments that surrounded the show Go Figure! itself. Most saying that beyond the obvious connection of human figures, that there was a brightness and strength of spirit that tied all of the artists work together.
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ART from shows

In the Mind’s Eye

Jude Lobe

 

Jude's out west

In explaining the inspiration behind her work for “In The Mind’s Eye”, painter, Jude Lobe says, ” Recently I had an explosion of new sun-drenched images imprinted in my mind on a trip to the big sky country in and near Santa Fe, NM. In this show, a majority of the artworks represent a visual adventure in expressing the glory and exuberance of these images I now find in my mind’s eye.  Some are representational of the natural environment and some are more abstract, but both exude the emotion of the moment and reference our strong connections to the earth. ”

 

Jude's buffalo

 

 

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Uncharted

_20150408_102728Nell Chandler

After Ali and Ellie and I brainstormed many suggestions of titles for our featured artist show Ali finally came up with Uncharted.

We could all relate to that title because they both had children that are getting ready to fly the nest and  I knew I had some uncharted territory of my own. I knew there were techniques I have long wanted to try with my jewelry.

I’d always wanted to try to work with colored pencils on metal and had just never found the time. This was the  perfect time. But I found the medium tedious as I applied layer after layer to achieve the depth I wanted to achieve. Plus the colors that I am normally drawn to wouldn’t show up on the metal as well as the colors that are not a part of my regular palette. I tried the gesso ground technique and contemplated the acrylic spray in between each layer but the gesso was just like white paper and I knew the acrylic spray would  eventually end up as gunk.

So I ended up scratching the surface with a stylist to created a rough surface for the prisma color to adhere to. It still took layers and layers but I got some satisfaction. I eventually accented it with a rapidograph (technical pen) and a white paint pen.

In the middle of this process, when I was getting discouraged, I was talking with a friend. I said how I had all these designs in my sketch book back when designs were just flowing out of me when my children were young that I never had a chance to make. We decided that that too was uncharted territory. So I fabricated a very linear group that has just been sitting on the pages of my sketchbook for years.