Orange County Studio Tour

This marks the 23nd year that the Orange County Artists Guild will host its Annual Open Studio Tour. During the first two weekends in November, more than eighty artists located throughout Orange County, including Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and surrounding areas will be participating in this juried event and opening their studios to visitors who will discover where the creative design happens!

For the seventh year, Pringle Teetor and Linda Carmel will be showing together at Carmel’s home studio, 101 Huntington Drive, Chapel Hill, #45 on the tour. Pringle’s blown glass and Linda’s textured paintings complement each other perfectly. There will be plenty to see and touch.

Ali Givens joins the studio tour for her first year. Ali creates fabric collages that are landscapes, cityscapes and still lifes sewn from colorful batiks and other natural fibers. Her studio is #12 on the tour located at 3611 Mijos Lane, Chapel Hill.

Lolette Guthrie paints primarily with oil. She builds up her canvases layer by layer. Each piece begins with a loose idea that explores the beauty of the natural world. Her studio, #67, is located in Chapel Hill at 113 Rhododendron Drive.

Marcy Lansman returns to the tour for her 12th year. Her new studio, #35, is located at 750 Weaver Dairy Road, Apt. 198, Chapel Hill. Marcy paints with acrylics and her work has evolved from realistic to more abstract, expressive of personal insights and emotions.

Eduardo Lapetina’s studio is located at 318 North Estes Drive, Chapel Hill, #55 on the tour map. This is his ninth year participating on the tour. Lapetina will show new abstract paintings with vibrant colors and in various sizes including very large pieces. His paintings are worked in complete solitude. They represent the discoveries of the unconscious mind. In the artist’s words, “They hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, and the magic of a private, secret language.”

Ellie Reinhold is joining the tour for the fifth year. She is #60 on the tour and will welcome you at her studio off Roosevelt Drive in Chapel Hill, in the neighborhood across from Cafe Driade. Reinhold’s explores vibrant landscapes using color, brushwork, and iconic imagery.

Michael Salemi is a woodturner who is showing jointly with Miriam Sagasti at her studio (#22). Michael’s work includes both traditional woodturning forms: bowls, plates and platters, and unusual pieces such as ikebanas.

Alice Levinson will be exhibiting her contemporary wall-hung textile pieces. Each is rich in color and texture, and composed of hand-dyed fabric, densely sewn. Her studio is #15 on the map, 3604 Pasture Road, Hillsborough.

Jason Smith creates one of a kind metal sculptures in steel and copper using reclaimed material. His sculpture is abstract. The manipulation of form in space allows the viewer to feel rhythm and movement in his compositions. Jason’s new studio is #2 on the map, 1709 NC HWY 86N, Hillsborough.

OCAG’s Open Studio Tour is a rare opportunity for art lovers from Orange County and beyond to meet artists in their places of work, to view and purchase art directly from the artist, and in many instances to watch as artists demonstrate how they create their pieces. Studio Tour brochures and maps of participants’ studios are available at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and other area locations or on the Guild website: http://www.OrangeCountyArtistsGuild.com

Many artists on this year’s tour will have work in the OCAG Preview Exhibit at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Their work will be on display from October 23 through November 12, 2017. This preview show is a wonderful opportunity for a first look at the work on the tour and can help you plan your tour route.

Opening Reception

Friday October 27

6-9

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Go Figure

Domain” is part of a series of paintings using hooped skirts as a metaphor for the constrictions society places on women. In this piece, I wanted to depict a woman’s life as defined by her home, which becomes the empire over which she has control.

Before starting, I decided to use the old masters’ palette of colors – Yellow Ochre, Payne’s Grey, and Burnt Umber – to which I added Mars Black and Titanium White.

I covered the entire canvas in a thin layer of modeling paste and then fashioned the skirt and figure with another layer. I built up the background with more modeling paste. Next, I drew the scene that I imagined going on under the skirt with pencil and began painting. I painted the surfaces where I applied the second layer of texture brown and then wiped away the excess, exposing the “thumbprint” of the painting.

in-progress-1

I moved through the rooms from left to right, using masking tape to help me keep the architectural lines straight. In the ballroom, I decided to apply modeling paste to the pillars and the drapes to give them more dimension. Later I added texure to the chandelier too.

 

in-progress-2

After I completed the scene under the skirt I began on the figure. I wanted her dress to have the look of polished stone, as if the woman has become a part of her home.

I played with different colors for the background, finally settling on shades of Sienna that I highlighted with Ochre and Gold to mimic the sky that you can see through the windows. I then echoed the texture and pattern of the background in the walls of the ballroom.

in-progress-3

I tried several different versions of the headdress and finally chose to add some hair to frame her face and a pendant to connect the hues of the background with those below the skirt.

Domain” was complete.

domain-4

With thanks to my husband, Harold Carmel for documenting this process.

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Colorful Language

July postcard RGB

 

Jewelry artist, Nell Chandler describes her thoughts about the show:

“When we first settled on the title Colorful Language for our show I felt an immediate connection. Even way back before I ever thought of making jewelry I had been telling stories through painting and printmaking. Now I paint and etch on my jewelry and I’m still telling little narratives.”

This year Nell is exploring the melding of techniques from her past. She is creating “story bracelets” with brand new messages by using visual images to tell the story. She is presently working on a Matriarch Bracelet that she sees as a contemplation of heritage and ancestors.

Nell adds, “My new work feels playful yet intense.”

Painter and assemblage artist, Michele Yellin, often begins her work “with a quote in the underpainting as way to start the painting.” Color is the language she uses with great boldness to say the things that cannot be expressed in words.

As she layers the canvas with color she finds that figures and shapes begin to emerge. Much like a writer developing a cast of characters, she lets these shapes and figures tell her who they are.

Michele moves from the sublime to the whimsical with deftness and a strong sense of her own artistic voice.

Fabric artist Ali Givens, who creates quilted textile collages, is exploring an entirely different pallet of colors following a year of work and study in a small town in the Italian piedmont. Her first work, Ivrea Windows, was inspired by the views from her apartment, but she soon realized that a view from one window could not express the essence of the town. She began taking photographs and marrying their elements to create more holistic representations.

Ali says, “As I was combining these photographs, I had something of an epiphany and realized that my photographs of home (Hillsborough) contained much of the richness and culture that I was finding in Ivrea. It is my hope that I can bring these observations to the Colorful Language show.”

 

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ART from shows

 

Larry bowlLarry Favorite

Although I am a relatively new member of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts,  I have been creating my distinctive art of ironwood from the Sonoran Desert for more that 40 years. My pieces include boxes, sculpted vases, wall hangings, and lamps that have been embellished with exquisite inlays of sterling silver, turquoise and other semi-precious gemstones.

Larry bird vase

This show’s theme of Earth  Wind and Fire is especially appropriate for my work, as ironwood trees grow out of the hot sands of the desert, are shaped by desert windstorms, and are then parched by the heat of the sun. Taking a piece of dull ironwood that has lain untouched in the desert for centuries and bringing it back to life as art is a spiritual process for me. This process reminds me of the unrecognized potential that we each carry within ourselves, it takes belief, effort, time and patience to bring forth that hidden potential and to turn it into something that is both useful and beautiful in the world.”

Larry vase

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ART from shows

Earth Wind and Fire

unspecifiedJude's image
JUDE LOBE
 
When I was a child, one might have called me a tom-boy. I spent endless days exploring the woods and parks, climbing trees and building forts near our home in Maryland. I continued my exploration of  wild and natural environments as an adult. Luckily, I lived equal distance from the Shenandoah and the Blue Ridge Mountains to Assateague and Chincoteague Islands. In these places I felt at home, peaceful, serene and wistful. 
These natural habitats give me a connection to a past, a history of bygone times. Being in these beautiful endangered landscapes gives me solace from stress and hope for a future. In this exhibit I revisit some of these places in my mind and attempt to capture the emotion I felt there and being captivated by the play of light on a rock cliff, or swaying grass in the wind.
 
My medium of choice for these landscapes is Cold Wax & Oil. The cold wax is a consistency of a paste wax. It is made of beeswax and resins. I mix it 50:50 with oil paints or earth pigments. It has the advantage of giving me the opportunity to show a history of the painting by building up layers of colors, then scratching through to reveal some of the obscured colored layers. To me it is a metaphor of the history of the landscape and how it has evolved over time. 
 
My paintings, rather than being a photographic likeness of the landscape, are rather an emotional interpretation of it with an abstract quality. My hope is that the viewer either gains a feeling of peace and hope I feel when in nature, or reminds them of a similar special place in their memory. 
 

Luminous

What the Mystery of Us Knows

What the Mystery of Us Knows

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ART from shows

Luminous

March postcard RGBArianna Bara is a metalsmith who takes her inspiration from nature. Bara says, “To be luminous is to be full of light, to be brilliant and dazzling even in the dark. I have always loved this word, maybe because it is so rich in imagery. It makes me think of moonlight on a starry night, or the delicate glowing creatures found in the darkest depths of the oceans.”

Bara uses sterling silver as the backdrop for her one-of-a-kind designs. She further explains. “As one who feels that we are spiritual beings on a human journey, the word (luminous) evokes the brilliance of the eternal spark within us and is a perfect description of what I am trying to convey in my work. I think of my sterling silver figurative jewelry pieces as ‘Radiant Beings’. I want them to stir a memory, long-forgotten perhaps, of where we come from and serve as a reminder of who we truly are.”

Painter Eduardo Lapetina has this to say about his work for the show Luminous. “I strive to produce luminous paintings that exhibit the powerful emotions embodied in the process. That is much more important to me than making images that are necessarily pleasing or objectively beautiful. The steps leading to my abstract paintings are the art of hiding and disclosing. It is the discovery of mysteries of the subconscious mind that are part of my own personal legend. Personality counts. These abstractions hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, intangibles and will. It is a collaboration of mind and spirit. It is a form of magic that may speak both to you and for you with a private, secret, confidential language. They also require something from viewer; it demands contemplation, study, feeling, and flights of fancy.

Opening Reception

March 25
6-9
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