Now and Again

 

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The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts is celebrating 10 years as a gallery with a group show including 42 members, past and present. The gallery opened in September of 2006, and the founding 15 members started the gallery as a leap of faith. The artists did not know each other, and they had little experience in running a business. The gallery is now run by 21 members who are equal partners and make decisions by consensus. Featured artist shows, group shows, and juried shows create a strong relationship between the artists and their surrounding community. Now and Again, the latest group show, is the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts’ way of celebrating with all of the talented artists and friends who have made the gallery a success.

Opening Reception

Friday

January 27

6-9

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The Art of Giving

holiday-rgbEach holiday season the members of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts transform the gallery to showcase original ornaments and hand-made gifts. The gallery’s 21 members work in a variety of media, providing a wide array of art and fine craft for holiday shoppers.

The glass art includes hand-blown vessels, ornaments, solar lights, paperweights, and jewelry. Fiber art on display includes framed collage quilts and hand dyed stitched cloth, knitted scarves; and fabric handbags. The jewelry in the show covers a variety of styles and techniques, from copper and bronze to sterling and fine silver necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings, some with gold accents and stones.  Visitors will also find metal sculpture, pottery, turned wood, enamels, and carved ironwood with turquoise and silver inlay. Fine art photography, oil and acrylic painting, encaustics, scratchboard, and mixed media work festively surround the three dimensional pieces on pedestals.

Explore the wonderful art exhibited at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts to find a special gift for that special person.

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Dreaming in Color

 

 

pringle's vasePringle Teetor

The theme of “Dreaming in Color” is perfect for me with regards to an art show.  I have always loved colors, mixing them, keeping them pure and combining colors with gold and silver in their chemistry to create new and beautiful colors. In one of the groups of pieces I have used colors in a haphazard way, combining and applying colors in a painterly fashion or as lines of three.  I studied painting in college and loved the work of Morris Louis. He would layer veils and rivulets of color over and over each other until you couldn’t see where one started and another began. I wanted to translate this into glass by using colors as strokes applied over and over to create a bold statement on glass instead of canvas.

The Incalmo bowls are made using a long and complicated process. Usually they are made with two or more glass blowers assembling each section or bubble of color one at a time.  Since I mostly work alone I had to figure out a way to produce these pieces with pure sections of color stacked on top of each other. I’ve always been inspired by the work of Boyd Sugiki and after visiting his studio in Seattle 5 years ago I decided to give his technique a try.  Long tubes of each color are blown exactly the same and annealed. Then they are cut into sections on a diamond saw. These sections then have to be ground and polished one at a time on a flat lapidary wheel.

Pringle's stiped bowl

When I return to the studio, I set the sections up in order in small electric kiln that heats them up to about 1000 degrees. Since they change color once they are hot, I map out carefully the order of the sections.  Then I pick up one section at a time on a hot pipe and stack them on top of each other. The fit must be exact!  Once the pieces are stacked, all the lines and grooves melted out and the connections are tight, I gather more glass over the entire stack and form the pieces.  This is time consuming and very precise work, the complete opposite of the organic painterly pieces.

Many of the pieces in this show are sandblasted. When glass is shiny it will reflect light but when the surface is sandblasted to a delicate matt, the colors will glow with the light.  There are some new clear pieces sandblasted using a medium to create a unique pattern. Words are combined with doodles, doodles that I have been doodling since I was a child.

As I gather my thoughts around what is now the 10th anniversary of opening our glassblowing studio and the 10th anniversary of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and my membership in this gallery, I am truly amazed at how lucky I have been to be able to do what I love everyday!

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ART from shows

It’s all about the story

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It’s All About The Story at The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts

In the three novellas that make up “Local Souls,” Allan Gurganus brings to life the complicated relationships of people who are as dark and colorful as the North Carolina town they inhabit. The artists of the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts depict these stories of survival, betrayal, love, longing, and liberation through visual imagery in paintings, photography, metal, fiber, glass, ceramics, and wood. It is a show for all those who appreciate Southern fiction and local art.

About the author:
Allan Gurganus is an American short story writer, essayist, and novelist best known for his ground breaking debut novel, “Oldest Confederate Widow Tells All,” which has sold over four million copies. Educated at Sarah Lawrence and The University of Iowa, he has taught at Sarah Lawrence, The Iowa Writer’s Workshop, and both Stanford and Duke Universities. Among his prizes are an Ingram Merrill Award and a 2006 Guggenheim fellowship. He lives in Hillsborough, NC.

Opening Reception

February 26

6-9

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Resolutions 2016

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The Hillsborough Gallery Of Arts Celebrates NC Artists With A Statewide Juried Show

RESOLUTIONS 2016, the title of The Hillsborough Gallery of Art’s second statewide juried show, is an exhibition of the work of artists from across North Carolina.

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned fine art and fine craft gallery located in historic Hillsborough, North Carolina, will celebrate the start of the New Year by hosting a juried fine art and fine craft exhibit from January 4 to January 24, 2016. Titled Resolutions 2016, the exhibition includes the work of two-dimensional and three-dimensional fine artists from throughout North Carolina.  All works are for sale.

Guest juror for the awards will be Dr. Peter Nisbet, Chief Curator and Interim Director of the Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC. Nisbet has extensive national and international experience in collection development and exhibitions. Formerly Curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum at the Harvard Art Museum, he was responsible for a collection of 39,000 works of art and played a leading role in the reconceptualization and revitalization of the museum. Nisbet holds a BA and MA from Cambridge University and a PhD in the History of Art from Yale Universiity

Opening Reception

January 8th

6-9

 

 

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ART from shows

In the Mind’s Eye

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ANCESTRAL GROUNDS, HOMEPLACE, REUNION

Susan Hope

Summer of 2014…I really, really needed a break…some call it a vacation but, just a break from the normal routine seemed it might be the respite needed. I decided to gift myself with time to just ‘play’ in the studio… no pressure, deadlines or expectations… just whatever happened would be ok.

There were piles of dusty old window sashes saved just because they were interesting and I knew I would do ‘something’ with them in that elusive ‘someday’. Bins of ‘scrap glass’ were stacked everywhere…the collection of all the chips of the rainbow kept for that same ‘someday’.

I began to ‘play’… Glass on glass mosaic is a technique that allows not just the surface beauty of the glass to be shown as in traditional mosaic work, but since the glass is glued to transparent glass and then grouted, each tiny piece of transparent color becomes a window allowing light to shine through. After cleaning away years of dust and refinishing the sashes, clear glass was cut and placed into each window pane, glued securely to the wood sash. Therapeutically, I began washing, cutting and snipping and chipping tiny pieces of glass and gradually, as if creating a puzzle, a design began to form. No expectations meant not having a preplanned design or drawing. A hoarded piece of antique glass was the perfect sun. ..a bright beginning. Once glued in place I had officially begun. As the days flowed into weeks and months the window sashes filled with tiny chips. Such a multitude of colors and types of glass were in these bins of treasure. Often a scrap would cause my mind to replay memories of past projects, people, places.

The center two sashes were finished first. They had become the rolling wild flower covered hills of Orange County, the Piedmont where we had lived for so long and had raised our family. The sun, the life giving force that still guides our rural farm lifestyle, burst with color and shone on the flowers swaying in the breeze under a swirling Carolina blue sky.

This was really fun…I wanted to do mountains next. We love the mountains of North Carolina and they have special meaning to our family. My mother’s grandmother and grandfather were Cherokee and walked these same places that we now enjoyed. On it went… chip, snip, glue, chip, snip, glue. Surprise jars of tiny fused glass pieces and became centers of flowers and stars. The moon slivered and hung in the sky over the Great Smoky Mountains…such peace.

The third set of windows began as the Piedmont slid down toward the Sandhills and the rivers flowed to the beaches of the Atlantic Ocean. Living near the Haw, Eno and Cape Fear river basins makes us so aware of the bond to our surroundings and how all things depend on one another for life. And so the chips of glass became rocks and grass and sand and sea. Annual reunions with family on the beaches off Emerald Ilse had provided a multitude of treasured shells and small rocks that made their way into the design until one day the last piece was glued… Not done yet. Each panel had to be grouted, cleaned, cleaned, cleaned… well you get the idea, but it really took weeks to finish this part of the process. One year later and they are here to visit

.Enjoy the journey, I surely did! Susan Jo Milne Hope- 2015

 

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In the Mind’s Eye

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Hillsborough Gallery Artists show us what they see in their “Mind’s Eye”

In its September Featured Artist Exhibit, “In The Mind’s Eye”, the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts showcases the work of fused glass artist Susan Hope, painter Jude Lobe and photographer Eric Saunders.

For fused glass artist, Susan Hope, her mind’s eye sees a wonderful comparison between listening to beautiful music and observing the beauty found in painting with glass. She writes, “In music, a single note does not make a symphony. For us to hear music, the composer must first arrange the notes one by one, placing and spacing and allowing them to interact with one another. So it is with the interaction of colors and their relationships to each other. This show, ‘In The Mind’s Eye’, is a review of past color work in glass as well as a venturing into a new realm of color mixing to produce glass ‘paintings’ that reflect in 3 dimensions the excitement of color in flux. Just as in musical harmony, color harmony brings joy and emotional response to the heart and sings a lovely song.”

In explaining the inspiration behind her work for “In The Mind’s Eye”, painter, Jude Lobe says, ” Recently I had an explosion of new sun-drenched images imprinted in my mind on a trip to the big sky country in and near Santa Fe, NM. In this show, a majority of the artworks represent a visual adventure in expressing the glory and exuberance of these images I now find in my mind’s eye.  Some are representational of the natural environment and some are more abstract, but both exude the emotion of the moment and reference our strong connections to the earth. ”

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Photographer Eric Saunders ponders what the phrase in the mind’s eye really means. He writes, “In thinking about the title of our show, ‘In The Mind’s Eye’, I found myself asking many questions: “Why do I make photographs? What do I see when I make photographs? What do I think I see when I make photographs? What do viewers of my photographs see? What do they think they see? What do I want them to see? I realized these very questions imply that, depending on the context, the term “mind’s eye” can mean many different things.

He goes on, “For me, each image I make is an attempt to create an abstract visual adventure for the viewer – an adventure like reading a story or listening to a piece of music. In order to do this effectively I look past the literal (i.e. a cloud, a sky, a house, a barn, a rock, a ripple in a stream, a placard, a beach, a section of rusty metal fence) and see abstract orderly patterns of light, color, line, texture, and form. Depending on the angle of view and the cropping and editing of the image, these patterns will move the viewer into the image and hold the viewer’s attention for a period of time, and perhaps stimulate the viewer’s imagination in a meaningful way. This is the eye in my mind.”

Opening Reception

Sept 25

6-9

 

 

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