Parallel Play

While considering a title for their three person show, Jason, Evelyn and Ellie sifted through many words in an effort to evoke their creative commonalities. Many came from geometry: intersection, structure, converge, planes, parallels, and perspective. Words related to play such as natural, spontaneous, and essential were another common thread. In the end “Parallel Play” seemed a perfect combination of both themes.

Ellie Reinhold states, “Several years ago I inadvertently fell in love with using geometric grids in my paintings. I’d paint a spray of circles or rectangles, to both break up and hold together my landscapes. I fell in love with the balance these paintings struck between landscape and abstraction. In lucky moments, the representation that remained was stronger once it had been pulled away from convention. While my work is informed by elements from the natural world, (tree forms in particular), my process pulls it away from simple landscape into a different arena altogether. This process demands a playful, risk-taking approach. A constant willingness to let go of things I love– to destroy what’s on the canvas– in order to find the path to a better painting.”

Sculptor, Jason Smith, states, “As an artist, sculpture has always been my primary focus. Though I have worked in many mediums, I always return to metal because of its strength, malleability and inherent beauty. My sculpture is abstract. I manipulate form in space to create visual balance, combining rhythm, movement, and action to create compositions that convey the energy found in my work.

Potter Evelyn Ward creates pots that reflect the strength of a salt fire with the delicacy of a sepia photograph. Ward writes, “I like to make good, useful pots that someone will enjoy using every day.” Her process for creating them is far from simple. First, each piece passes through a labor-intensive salt firing. Then the pots are placed in a second electric kiln firing, which fastens ceramic decals of delicate plant drawings, or photographs to the rich, salt-glazed background. Evelyn designs and creates all of the images for the decals, which are derived from her photographs and drawings of botanical subjects.

Opening Reception

6-9

April 28

Let the River Answer

march-postcard-rgbArianna Bara describes the inspiration for each of her new one-of-kind creations in sterling silver: “My pieces for this show are about questions. The ones we all have about why we are here and what we are here to do. Believing as I do that we are spiritual beings having a human experience and that nature is our partner and guide in that experience, the search for answers leads me to look to what is right beneath my feet, to what is right beside me as I walk in the woods or along the river. I believe the answers surround us and are there for us to discover.”

Wood turner, Michael Salemi writes, “Normally, rivers contain the flow of water within their banks. But when water is too powerful to be contained, the river answers by changing. My work for this show displays the same tension. Some pieces are controlled shapings of wood to classic and expected forms, but others reflect the power of the wood itself—the work becomes what the wood would have it be.”

Of his new work for the show, Eduardo Lapetina states, “My paintings are a way for me to enter the world, not an escape from it. A painting opens a door into a space in which a play may be staged– where conflict, climax, and resolution all come together. In the process of creation, a painting becomes a battlefield for my struggles about what is, what is not, what ought to be, what I like, what I love, what I hate, frustrations, disenchantment, embarrassments. My art exposes to the world my most private thoughts and feelings, forming a spatial connection between what lives within me and what is alive in everyone else. I want my spaces to be painted without intention, without conscious technique, without anything that might interfere with the connections I seek to create. I do not want to keep a tradition. I am not looking for beauty, but the viewer might find it in my art. My paintings are not about any particular theme or motif, they are attempts to convey the immaterial through materiality. My aim is to project energy, visual vibrations, light, voices, excitement, and enthusiasm, and to capture them in a physical form that you can take home with you.”

Opening Reception

Friday March 31st

6-9

 

 

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Now and Again

 

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The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts is celebrating 10 years as a gallery with a group show including 42 members, past and present. The gallery opened in September of 2006, and the founding 15 members started the gallery as a leap of faith. The artists did not know each other, and they had little experience in running a business. The gallery is now run by 21 members who are equal partners and make decisions by consensus. Featured artist shows, group shows, and juried shows create a strong relationship between the artists and their surrounding community. Now and Again, the latest group show, is the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts’ way of celebrating with all of the talented artists and friends who have made the gallery a success.

Opening Reception

Friday

January 27

6-9

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Go Figure

Marcy Lansman

Many of these paintings express my nostalgia for a kind of childhood play that seems rare today, nostalgia for a time when children ran around outdoors uncoached and unscheduled. I’m intrigued by the excitement and collaboration that emerges from that kind of play. Below is a painting of one young boy pouring water on another. I love the combination of concentration and curiosity on the pourer’s face

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This and several other paintings are based on fifty-year old photos of my sons. I’ve solicited candid photos from friends and family, but often what I get back are smiling faces looking straight into the camera. So I’ve taken to lurking around public playgrounds with my camera, concerned that some parent will suspect I’m up to no good. My friends assure me that at my age I don’t need to worry, but I keep a “bio-card” in my pocket just to prove I’m a legitimate artist.

For the painting below, I photographed a group of girls cooking up a witches brew of moss and leaves at the bottom of a slide. (I’ve transformed the slide into a kettle.) No one was urging them on or encouraging them to be creative. I watched them for fifteen minutes charmed by their obliviousness and intensity.

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Many of my paintings are labeled “ mixed media” because of a technique I use to create the surface. I put down layers of various kinds of rice paper and gesso, producing a random pattern. Then I use layers of watery acrylic paint to create the image. Since paper and gesso take the paint differently, the surface varies in texture and color. This technique is one way of avoiding the “plasticky” look of acrylic paint, making acrylic paint look a little like watercolor.

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Colorful Language

Michele Yellin
Several of the paintings that I created for this year’s featured artist exhibit carry a secret inside of them.They are filled with colorful language. By that I don’t mean that I have painted curse words all over them, although at times I am tempted, but rather, I have first written a phrase in paint on the surface of the canvas.This is a good way for me to get a painting going. It provides a  structure for the painting, and an interesting or profound thought to keep in mind throughout the arduous process of creating.
 Michele writing
In the painting Giving Up On Being Perfect, this is what is written in the underpainting:
“The thing that is really hard and really amazing is giving up on being perfect and beginning the work of becoming yourself.” by Anna Quindlen.
After I paint the phrase, I fill in the rest of the surface with lots of color creating an abstract
painting that eventually obliterates the words. Hopefully I have taken the time to write the phrase on the stretcher boards on the back of the painting, because if I am lucky, the title of the painting will come from that phrase and be perfectly appropriate.
 Michele underpainting
The next step for me is to look at the abstracted painting, and discover what images are hidden in the paint and texture.Using line and color, I will start to define what I see in the paint. Bit by bit, I will add to the painting until the composition is complete.
MicheleYellinGivingupOnbeingPerfect
While I don’t create every piece this way, I use many of the same practices when I am creating art. Color says the things that I can not find the words to say. It is its own language.
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ART from shows

Earth Wind and Fire

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JUDE LOBE
 
When I was a child, one might have called me a tom-boy. I spent endless days exploring the woods and parks, climbing trees and building forts near our home in Maryland. I continued my exploration of  wild and natural environments as an adult. Luckily, I lived equal distance from the Shenandoah and the Blue Ridge Mountains to Assateague and Chincoteague Islands. In these places I felt at home, peaceful, serene and wistful. 
These natural habitats give me a connection to a past, a history of bygone times. Being in these beautiful endangered landscapes gives me solace from stress and hope for a future. In this exhibit I revisit some of these places in my mind and attempt to capture the emotion I felt there and being captivated by the play of light on a rock cliff, or swaying grass in the wind.
 
My medium of choice for these landscapes is Cold Wax & Oil. The cold wax is a consistency of a paste wax. It is made of beeswax and resins. I mix it 50:50 with oil paints or earth pigments. It has the advantage of giving me the opportunity to show a history of the painting by building up layers of colors, then scratching through to reveal some of the obscured colored layers. To me it is a metaphor of the history of the landscape and how it has evolved over time. 
 
My paintings, rather than being a photographic likeness of the landscape, are rather an emotional interpretation of it with an abstract quality. My hope is that the viewer either gains a feeling of peace and hope I feel when in nature, or reminds them of a similar special place in their memory. 
 

Luminous

What the Mystery of Us Knows

What the Mystery of Us Knows

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ART from shows