Earth Wind and Fire

unspecifiedgarry redGarry Childs
 
All of my work is formed on the potters wheel from terra-cotta clay. I apply glazes and pigments to my pots when they have reached a state potters call “leather-hard” which is when the clay has stiffened up enough to handle but is not completely dry. I usually do this by spraying but sometimes also with a brush. I then carve through the glaze into the still damp clay to achieve the various patterns seen on my work.
unspecifiedGarry, blue
I encourage people to touch and handle my work. Pots are made with hands and they should be “looked at” with hands. Texture, particularly the contrast between the smooth glazed areas and the rougher, hard edges of the carved surface is very important. Putting both hands on a piece and moving them up-and-down allows you to truly feel the shape and the ridges left by my fingers in the soft clay. I also think it’s great fun to put your head down inside one of the big pieces and holler, the echoes are wonderful.
 
unspecifiedgarry carving
My pots are made for people’s homes. My bowls and platters look best on tables with food being shared by families and friends, my planters and vases with someone’s favorite herb or fresh flowers. Some pieces are certainly more decorative in nature than others. Those are an expression of my joy in the process that hopefully becomes a part of someone’s day to day life.
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Earth Wind and Fire

unspecifiedJude's image
JUDE LOBE
 
When I was a child, one might have called me a tom-boy. I spent endless days exploring the woods and parks, climbing trees and building forts near our home in Maryland. I continued my exploration of  wild and natural environments as an adult. Luckily, I lived equal distance from the Shenandoah and the Blue Ridge Mountains to Assateague and Chincoteague Islands. In these places I felt at home, peaceful, serene and wistful. 
These natural habitats give me a connection to a past, a history of bygone times. Being in these beautiful endangered landscapes gives me solace from stress and hope for a future. In this exhibit I revisit some of these places in my mind and attempt to capture the emotion I felt there and being captivated by the play of light on a rock cliff, or swaying grass in the wind.
 
My medium of choice for these landscapes is Cold Wax & Oil. The cold wax is a consistency of a paste wax. It is made of beeswax and resins. I mix it 50:50 with oil paints or earth pigments. It has the advantage of giving me the opportunity to show a history of the painting by building up layers of colors, then scratching through to reveal some of the obscured colored layers. To me it is a metaphor of the history of the landscape and how it has evolved over time. 
 
My paintings, rather than being a photographic likeness of the landscape, are rather an emotional interpretation of it with an abstract quality. My hope is that the viewer either gains a feeling of peace and hope I feel when in nature, or reminds them of a similar special place in their memory. 
 

Luminous

What the Mystery of Us Knows

What the Mystery of Us Knows

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Resolutions 2016

_20160105_145744resolutions csard

The Hillsborough Gallery Of Arts Celebrates NC Artists With A Statewide Juried Show

RESOLUTIONS 2016, the title of The Hillsborough Gallery of Art’s second statewide juried show, is an exhibition of the work of artists from across North Carolina.

The Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, an artist-owned fine art and fine craft gallery located in historic Hillsborough, North Carolina, will celebrate the start of the New Year by hosting a juried fine art and fine craft exhibit from January 4 to January 24, 2016. Titled Resolutions 2016, the exhibition includes the work of two-dimensional and three-dimensional fine artists from throughout North Carolina.  All works are for sale.

Guest juror for the awards will be Dr. Peter Nisbet, Chief Curator and Interim Director of the Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC. Nisbet has extensive national and international experience in collection development and exhibitions. Formerly Curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum at the Harvard Art Museum, he was responsible for a collection of 39,000 works of art and played a leading role in the reconceptualization and revitalization of the museum. Nisbet holds a BA and MA from Cambridge University and a PhD in the History of Art from Yale Universiity

Opening Reception

January 8th

6-9

 

 

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Preview of the Orange County Studio Tour at Hillsborough Gallery of Arts

OCAG card RGB

 

Hillsborough Gallery of Arts Exhibit Previews Orange County Artists Guild Studio Tour

Hillsborough Gallery of Arts members Linda Carmel, Chris Graebner, Lolette Guthrie, Marcy Lansman, Eduardo Lapetina, Ellie Reinhold, and Pringle Teetor will be included in a preview show for the upcoming OCAG Open Studio Tour.

This marks the 21st year that the Orange County Artists Guild will host its Annual Open Studio Tour. Over eighty artists located throughout Orange County, including Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and surrounding areas are participating in this juried event, by opening their studios so visitors can discover where the creative magic happens!

Linda Carmel and Pringle Teetor will show together at Linda Carmel’s home studio, 101 Huntington Drive, Chapel Hill, #56 on the tour. Carmel will be giving demonstrations of her unique painting technique that uses acrylic modeling paste. Teetor, a full time glass blower, has her studio in Creedmoor but will show a video demonstration of her glass blowing. She will exhibit a variety of pieces – both indoor and outdoor: Vases, bowls, drinking glasses, decanters, garden sculpture, pumpkins, solar garden lights, and jewelry.
This is Chris Graebner’s fifth year on the tour. As a painter she most often paints landscapes in oils, but her background includes botanical art with watercolor and ink. Graebner enjoys mixing media to see what each brings to the other. Some of her recent work is a return to botanical silverpoint drawings that she colored with layers of highly diluted acrylics instead of more traditional watercolors. In addition to her landscape painting, this summer she has been exploring botanical subjects using scratchboard and colored inks. Graebner invites you to visit her in her studio, #7 on the Tour map, just a couple of blocks from the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts in downtown Hillsborough.

Lolette Guthrie’s studio is located in her home at 113 Rhododendron Drive, Chapel Hill, studio #62 on the tour map. This will be her seventh year on the tour. Painting largely from memory and painting both in oil and in pastel, Guthrie derives most of her inspiration from time spent on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. She will be showing both oil and pastel landscapes and abstracted landscapes that explore what it felt like to be at a particular place at a particular time.
Marcy Lansman will be welcoming visitors to her home studio, #53 on the tour map, on Mt. Bolus Road close to the center of Chapel Hill. This is Lansman’s eleventh year on the Studio Tour. Many neighbors drop by as well as repeat customers from previous years. It is a great time to reconnect with old friends and show them the new directions her work is taking.

Eduardo Lapetina’s studio, #72 on the tour map, is located at 318 North Estes Drive, Chapel Hill. This is his seventh year participating on the tour. Lapetina will show new abstract paintings with vibrant colors and various sizes including very large pieces. His paintings are worked in complete solitude. They represent the discoveries of the unconscious mind. In the artist’s words, “They hold the promise of dreams, visions, fears, … and the magic of a private, secret language.”

Ellie Reinhold is joining the Tour for the third year. She is studio #75 on the tour and will welcome you at her studio off Roosevelt Drive in Chapel Hill, in the neighborhood across from Cafe Driade. Reinhold’s figurative art has been described as “soulful,” “dreamscapes,” and “internal landscapes.”  She explores emotional experiences using color, brushwork, and iconic imagery that often draws from nature. Her small abstract works are done mostly with knives and allow her to explore elements such as texture, shadow, contrast, and color in their own right, unfettered by the demands of specific content.
OCAG’s Open Studio Tour is a rare opportunity for art lovers to meet artists in their places of work, to view and purchase art directly from the artist and in many instances to watch as they demonstrate how they create their pieces. The Studio Tour brochures and map of participants’ studios are available at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts and other area locations or on the Guild website: http://www.OrangeCountyArtistsGuild.com
Many of the eighty plus artists on this year’s tour will have work in the OCAG Preview Exhibit at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. Their work will be on display from October 26 through November 15, 2015. This preview show is a wonderful opportunity for a first look at the work to be offered on the tour to help you plan your tour route.

Opening Receptions

Friday, October 30

6-9

 

 

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Present Tense

Chris Grabener

Present Tense is an appropriate title for my current work. It seems to me that it is constantly moving, changing, evolving. I enjoy trying new things and learning how I can use them to achieve the effects I see in my mind.

moonlight

My paintings fall into three general categories: botanicals, landscapes (including buildings) and what fellow painter Jude Lobe refers to as “mischief.” Mostly I toggle back and forth between botanicals and landscapes. Most of the work in this show falls under the broad umbrella of landscapes and they explore different surfaces and different methods of applying paint. Some of the paintings are on canvas, or linen, some on wood panel, and some on clayboard. Each of these surfaces accepts paint differently and combining their properties with different types of brushes, painting knives and painting mediums can give very different results to the same image. So after selecting an image, I consider the size, painting surface, color palette and the types of brushes and mediums for that painting. I map out a direction for the painting and begin, but I find that as I work, the painting finds its own course and often flows in channels I had not fully anticipated.

under the moo

Three of the night paintings involve the use a large, dry, mop brush to move thin layers of paint from the central moon across the surface of the painting. Winter Moon is painted on panel, a hard non-absorbent surface on which the paint moves quite freely. Under the Moonlight is on clayboard, a hard but absorbent surface. On it, the paint begins to be absorbed as it moves out from the center of the moon, taking more layers and not moving as far or as readily. Moonlight Bay is on canvas, a soft, non-absorbent but textured surface which holds paint and makes the layers thicker and with a stippled appearance.

winter moon, ssteeple

Cathedral Door is a small oil and cold wax painting on canvas. The door itself is painted with a brush and without the addition of cold wax, while the stonework is painted with a pallet knife and many layers of oil paint mixed with wax. The wax is then scraped through to create joints in the stone blocks.

 

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What I came here for

Michele Yellin

girl

What I Came Here For was not the first name Arianna Bara, Chris Burniside and I decided on for our Featured Artist Exhibit. In fact, we were pretty committed to our first title, until we found out it was too long (and also, perhaps, slightly too boring). It wasn’t until we met for the third time over cups of coffee and Arianna shared the poem A Morning Offering by John O’Donohue that it was obvious what our exhibit should be called. It comes from the last stanza of the poem and is as follows:

May I have the courage today
To live the life that I would love,
To postpone my dream no longer
But do at last what I came here for
And waste my heart on fear no more.

There are so many beautiful phrases in this poem, but the line “To do at last, what I came here for” resonated profoundly with all of us. I think that it probably rings a bell with everyone. Why are we here? We have been given this great gift of life. Are we wasting it? Are we doing the things we are meant to do? For Arianna, Chris and me, this exhibit of our work is tangible evidence that we are doing the things we were born to do.

rabbit

When I am in the middle of working on  a painting, and struggling to solve the puzzle of it, I am often filled with angst and despair. It seems as if I will never get it figured out. I have to remind myself over and over to have faith in the process. No matter how many pieces of art I create, I never feel like it comes easily. It feels just as likely that I will fail in my effort to create something beautiful, something joy-filled, than succeed. And yet, and yet, and yet…as many times as I have considered quitting, I continue to plod on. And then, all at once it seems, I successfully complete a piece of art! And then another! And another! I am doing what I came here for!

And now, if I only I could waste my heart on fear no more….

sundhine

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